Benno Möhlmann

Last updated

Benno Möhlmann
Benno Mohlmann 2012 2.jpg
Möhlmann in 2012
Personal information
Full nameBenno Hans Möhlmann
Date of birth (1954-08-01) 1 August 1954 (age 66)
Place of birth Lohne, West Germany
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Playing position(s) Midfielder
Youth career
0000–1972 Blau-Weiß Lohne
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1972–1978 Preußen Münster 199 (27)
1978–1987 Werder Bremen 230 (33)
1987–1989 Hamburger SV 25 (2)
Total454(62)
National team
1982 West Germany U-21 1 (0)
1982 West Germany Olympic 1 (0)
Teams managed
1989–1990 Hamburger SV (assistant)
1992–1995 Hamburger SV
1995–1997 Eintracht Braunschweig
1997–2000 Greuther Fürth
2000–2004 Arminia Bielefeld
2004–2007 Greuther Fürth
2007–2008 Eintracht Braunschweig
2008–2009 Greuther Fürth
2010–2011 FC Ingolstadt
2011–2015 FSV Frankfurt
2015–2016 1860 Munich
2016–2017 Preußen Münster
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Benno Hans Möhlmann (born 1 August 1954) is a retired German football player and manager who last managed Preußen Münster.

Contents

Career

Möhlmann began his senior career in 1972 as a midfielder with Preußen Münster in third tier Regionalliga. In 1978, he moved to Werder Bremen in the Bundesliga. He remained with Bremen until 1987 when he moved to Hamburger SV, finishing his playing career in 1989. In total, Möhlmann played in 255 Bundesliga matches, scoring 35 goals. [1] [2]

Managerial career

Möhlmann's managing career started at Hamburger SV in 1992. From 1995 until 1997 Möhlmann was manager of Eintracht Braunschweig, then Möhlmann moved to Greuther Fürth, staying at that club until 2000. From 2000 until 2004, Möhlmann was manager of Arminia Bielefeld, winning promotion to 1. Bundesliga in 2002, but the team was immediately relegated the year after. Möhlmann was left in February 2004 and returned to Greuther Fürth. [3] Möhlmann became manager of Eintracht Braunschweig in July 2007. [4] After a string of unsatisfying performances by the team, Möhlmann stepped down as manager in May 2008. [4] In July 2008, Möhlmann became for the third time the manager of Greuther Fürth, but he cancelled his contract on 20 December 2009. [5] On 7 November 2010, Möhlmann was appointed manager of FC Ingolstadt. [6] After almost exactly one year with Ingolstadt, Möhlmann was sacked as manager on 9 November 2011, after losing four of the five previous matches. [7] Möhlmann became manager of FSV Frankfurt on 21 December 2011. [8] He was sacked on 18 May 2015. [9] His final match was a 3–1 loss to Union Berlin. [10] On 6 October he was appointed as the head coach of 1860 Munich. [11] He was sacked on 19 April 2016. [12]

On 15 October 2016, he was appointed as the new head coach of Preußen Münster. [13] He was sacked on 10 December 2017. [14]

Managerial statistics

As of 20 May 2017
TeamFromToRecord
GWDLWin %Ref.
Hamburger SV 23 September 1992 [15] 5 October 1995 [15] 109343441031.19 [15]
Eintracht Braunschweig 1 July 1995 [16] 30 June 1997 [16] 5939911066.10
Greuther Fürth 15 October 1997 [4] 21 October 2000 [4] 108403929037.04 [17]
Arminia Bielefeld 23 October 2000 [4] 17 February 2004 [3] 119433343036.13
Greuther Fürth17 February 2004 [3] 30 June 2007 [4] 122572540046.72 [17]
Eintracht Braunschweig1 July 2007 [16] 12 May 2008 [16] 34111310032.35 [16]
Greuther Fürth27 May 2008 [18] 20 December 2009 [5] 5525921045.45 [17]
FC Ingolstadt 7 November 2010 [6] 9 November 2011 [7] 39131214033.33
FSV Frankfurt 21 December 2011 [8] 18 May 2015 [9] 122433049035.25
1860 Munich 6 October 2015 [11] 19 April 201611326027.27
Preußen Münster 15 October 201610 December 20173416513047.06
Total801321209271040.07

Honours

Related Research Articles

Thomas von Heesen German football player and manager

Thomas von Heesen is a former German football attacking midfielder, and a current coach.

Armin Veh German football player and manager

Armin Veh is a German former football midfielder and current manager. He last managed Eintracht Frankfurt. He won the German championship with Bundesliga team VfB Stuttgart in 2007. Veh and his team also had the chance to win "the double" by winning the DFB-Pokal on 26 May 2007 in Berlin, but lost 2–3 in overtime against 1. FC Nürnberg. Since 11 December 2017, Veh is the sports director of 1. FC Köln.

The 2009–10 2. Bundesliga was the 36th season of the 2. Bundesliga, the second tier of Germany's football league. The season began on 7 August 2009 and ended on 9 May 2010. A winter break was held between 21 December 2009 and 14 January 2010, though the period has been reduced from six to three weeks.

The 2009–10 DFB-Pokal was the 67th season of the annual German football cup competition. The competition began with the first round on 31 July 2009 and ended on 15 May 2010 with the final which is traditionally held at Olympiastadion in Berlin. Since the cup winner, Bayern Munich, also won the German championship and the runner-up, Werder Bremen, qualified for the Champions League, VfB Stuttgart, the sixth-placed team of the championship, qualified for the 2010–11 UEFA Europa League third qualifying round instead.

The 2010–11 DFB-Pokal was the 68th season of the annual German football cup competition. The competition began on 13 August 2010 with the first round and concluded on 21 May 2011 with the final at the Olympiastadion in Berlin. The competition was won by Schalke 04, who thus qualified for the play-off round of the 2011–12 UEFA Europa League.

The 2010–11 season is the 101st season of competitive football in Germany.

The 2011–12 2. Bundesliga was the 38th season of the 2. Bundesliga, Germany's second tier of its football league system. The season commenced on 15 July 2011, three weeks earlier than the 2011–12 Bundesliga season, and ended with the last games on 6 May 2012. The traditional winter break was to be held between the weekends around 18 December 2011 and 4 February 2012. The league comprises eighteen teams.

Tomas Oral footballer

Tomas Oral is a German football manager of FC Ingolstadt.

The 2011–12 season was MSV Duisburg's 112th season and their 4th season in the 2. Bundesliga after failing to be promoted. They reached the 2010–11 DFB-Pokal final last year.

The 2011–12 season of Eintracht Braunschweig began on 5 June with a first training session. It is the club's first season in the 2. Bundesliga after being promoted from the 3. Liga. Eintracht started the season successfully with wins over 1860 Munich and Alemannia Aachen, leading the league on the first and second matchday. In the end the club finished the season as 8th, never being in serious danger of relegation.

The 2011–12 season is the 102nd season of competitive football in Germany.

Peter Vollmann German footballer and manager

Peter Vollmann is a German former footballplayer and manager who last managed VfR Aalen. As a player, he spent one season in the 2. Bundesliga with Rot-Weiß Lüdenscheid.

2012–13 Bundesliga 50th season of the Bundesliga

The 2012–13 Bundesliga was the 50th season of the Bundesliga, Germany's premier football league. The season began on 24 August 2012 with the season opening match at Westfalenstadion involving defending champions Borussia Dortmund and SV Werder Bremen and ended with the last games on 18 May 2013, with a winter break between the weekends around 15 December 2012 and 19 January 2013. Bayern Munich managed to secure the championship of the 2012–13 season after only 28 match days, beating their previous record by two matches.

The 2012–13 2. Bundesliga was the 39th season of the 2. Bundesliga, Germany's second-level football league. The season began on 3 August 2012 and ended with the last games on 19 May 2013, with a winter break held between the weekends around 15 December 2012 and 2 February 2013.

The 2013–14 Bundesliga was the 51st season of the Bundesliga, Germany's premier football league. The season began on 9 August 2013 and the final matchday was on 10 May 2014. The winter break started on 23 December 2013 and ended on 24 January 2014. Bayern Munich were the defending champions.

The 2013–14 DFB-Pokal was the 71st season of the annual German football cup competition. It began on 2 August 2013 with the first of six rounds and ended on 17 May 2014 with the final at the Olympiastadion in Berlin. Bayern Munich went on to win the competition, defeating Borussia Dortmund 2–0 in the final.

The 2014–15 Bundesliga was the 52nd season of the Bundesliga, Germany's premier football competition. The season started on 22 August 2014 and the final matchday took place on 23 May 2015. Bayern Munich won their 25th German title on 26 April 2015.

The 2014–15 2. Bundesliga was the 41st season of the 2. Bundesliga, Germany's second-level football competition.

The 2014–15 Eintracht Braunschweig season is the 121st season in the club's football history. In 2014–15 the club plays in the 2. Bundesliga, the second tier of German football. It is the club's first season in this league since having been relegated from the Bundesliga in 2014.

The 2015–16 1. FC Union Berlin season was the 50th season in the football club's history. For the 6th consecutive season, Union Berlin played in the 2. Bundesliga, where they finished 6th. They also participated in this season's edition of the domestic cup, the DFB-Pokal, where they were eliminated in the first round by Viktoria Köln. The season covers a period from 1 July 2015 to 30 June 2016.

References

  1. "Germany - Player Data - SC Preußen Münster". rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 November 2015.
  2. "Benno Möhlmann ist neuer Cheftrainer des FSV Frankfurt" [Benno Möhlmann is New Head Coach of FSV Frankfurt] (in German). FSV Frankfurt. 4 January 2012.
  3. 1 2 3 "Möhlmann wechselt nach Fürth". kicker (in German). 17 February 2004. Retrieved 5 March 2013.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 "Benno Möhlmann" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 5 March 2013.
  5. 1 2 "Möhlmann nicht mehr Trainer in Ronhof". kicker (in German). 20 December 2009. Retrieved 5 March 2013.
  6. 1 2 "Möhlmann übernimmt in Ingolstadt". DFL (in German). 7 November 2010. Archived from the original on 28 September 2012. Retrieved 7 November 2010.
  7. 1 2 "FCI beurlaubt Möhlmann". DFL (in German). 9 November 2011. Archived from the original on 23 July 2012. Retrieved 9 November 2011.
  8. 1 2 ""Wunschkandidat" Möhlmann ist da". kicker (in German). 21 December 2011. Retrieved 5 March 2013.
  9. 1 2 "FSV Frankfurt entlässt Trainer Möhlmann" (in German). Süddeutsche Zeitung. 18 May 2015. Retrieved 18 May 2015.
  10. "FSV Frankfurt". kicker.de (in German). kicker. Retrieved 18 May 2015.
  11. 1 2 Beckenkamp, Jonas (6 October 2015). "Verbeulte Hose, geballte Erfahrung" (in German). Süddeutsche Zeitung. Retrieved 6 October 2015.
  12. "1860 entlässt Möhlmann - Bierofka übernimmt". dfb.de (in German). Deutscher Fußball-Bund e.V. Retrieved 19 April 2016.
  13. "Trainerentscheidung: Neuanfang mit Rückkehrer Benno Möhlmann". scpreussen-muenster.de. 15 October 2016. Archived from the original on 18 October 2016. Retrieved 15 October 2016.
  14. "Münster stellt Trainer Möhlmann frei". dfb.de. 10 December 2017. Retrieved 10 December 2017.
  15. 1 2 3 "Hamburger SV" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 20 January 2014.
  16. 1 2 3 4 5 "Eintracht Braunschweig" (in German). kicker. Retrieved 20 January 2014.
  17. 1 2 3 "SpVgg Greuther Fürth". kicker.de (in German). kicker. Retrieved 23 February 2015.
  18. "Hack: Möhlmann "einzige Option"". kicker (in German). 27 May 2008. Retrieved 5 March 2013.