Beondegi

Last updated
Beondegi
Beondegi.jpg
Course Street food
Place of origin Korea
Associated national cuisine Korean cuisine
Main ingredients Silkworm pupae
Similar dishes Nhộng tằm
Korean name
Hangul
번데기
Revised Romanization beondegi
McCune–Reischauer pŏndegi
IPA [pʌn.de.ɡi]

Beondegi (번데기), literally "pupa", is a Korean street food made with silkworm pupae. [1] It is usually sold from street vendors. The boiled or steamed snack food is served in paper cups with toothpick skewers. [2]

Pupa Life stage of some insects undergoing transformation

A pupa is the life stage of some insects undergoing transformation between immature and mature stages. The pupal stage is found only in holometabolous insects, those that undergo a complete metamorphosis, with four life stages: egg, larva, pupa, and imago. The processes of entering and completing the pupal stage are controlled by the insect's hormones, especially juvenile hormone, prothoracicotropic hormone, and ecdysone.

Street food ready-to-eat food or drink on a street

Street food is ready-to-eat food or drink sold by a hawker, or vendor, in a street or other public place, such as at a market or fair. It is often sold from a portable food booth, food cart, or food truck and meant for immediate consumption. Some street foods are regional, but many have spread beyond their region of origin. Most street foods are classed as both finger food and fast food, and are cheaper on average than restaurant meals. According to a 2007 study from the Food and Agriculture Organization, 2.5 billion people eat street food every day.

<i>Bombyx mori</i> species of insect

Bombyx mori, the domestic silkmoth, is an insect from the moth family Bombycidae. It is the closest relative of Bombyx mandarina, the wild silkmoth. The silkworm is the larva or caterpillar of a silkmoth. It is an economically important insect, being a primary producer of silk. A silkworm's preferred food is white mulberry leaves, though they may eat other mulberry species and even Osage orange. Domestic silkmoths are closely dependent on humans for reproduction, as a result of millennia of selective breeding. Wild silkmoths are different from their domestic cousins as they have not been selectively bred; they are thus not as commercially viable in the production of silk.

Canned beondegi can also be found in grocery stores and convenience stores.

Silkmoth pupae are also eaten in a number of other cultures.

Entomophagy feeding behaviour that uses insects as food

Entomophagy describes the practice of eating insects by humans.

Assam State in northeast India

Assam is a state in northeastern India, situated south of the eastern Himalayas along the Brahmaputra and Barak River valleys. Assam covers an area of 78,438 km2 (30,285 sq mi). The state is bordered by Bhutan and Arunachal Pradesh to the north; Nagaland and Manipur to the east; Meghalaya, Tripura, Mizoram and Bangladesh to the south; and West Bengal to the west via the Siliguri Corridor, a 22 kilometres (14 mi) strip of land that connects the state to the rest of India.

China Country in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion in 2017. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third or fourth largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

Japan Island country in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

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Porridge Food

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Offal internal organs and entrails of a butchered animal

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Boiled peanuts

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Fritter

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Stinky tofu Chinese fermented tofu with a strong odor; usually sold at night markets or roadside stands as a snack, or in lunch bars as a side dish, rather than in restaurants

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Rice cake food

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Croquette potato dish

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Regional street food Wikimedia list article

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Octopus as food food ingredient

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Congee type of rice porridge or gruel popular in many Asian countries

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Spring roll type of dim sum

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References

  1. Pettid, Michael J. (2008). Korean Cuisine: An Illustrated History. London: Reaktion Books. p. 173. ISBN   978-1-86189-348-2.
  2. Kraig, Bruce; Sen, Colleen Taylor, eds. (2013). Street Food around the World: An Encyclopedia of Food and Culture. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO. p. 320. ISBN   978-1-59884-954-7.
  3. "10 Weird Foods in India - Eri polu". February 2013.
  4. Choi, Charles Q. (13 January 2009). "Care for a Silkworm With Your Tang?". ScienceNOW Daily News. Archived from the original on 25 February 2011. Retrieved 14 January 2009.Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)