Berezin B-20

Last updated
B-20
Tula State Museum of Weapons (79-30).jpg
Second from the top in the middle
Type Autocannon
Place of origin USSR
Service history
In service Soviet Air Forces, Soviet Air Defence Forces
Wars World War II, Korean War
Production history
Designer Mikhail Yevgenyevich Berezin
Designed1944
Specifications
Mass25 kg (55 lb)

Cartridge 20×99mm
Caliber 20 mm (0.8 in)
Barrels1
Action Gas
Rate of fire 800 rounds/min
Muzzle velocity 750–770 m/s (2,500–2,500 ft/s)

The Berezin B-20 (Березин Б-20) was a 20 mm caliber autocannon used by Soviet aircraft in World War II.

Contents

Development

The B-20 was created by Mikhail Yevgenyevich Berezin in 1944 by converting his 12.7 mm Berezin UB machine gun to use the 20 mm rounds used by the ShVAK cannon. No other changes were made to the weapon which was pneumatically or mechanically charged and was available in both synchronized and unsynchronized versions. In 1946, an electrically-fired version was created for the turrets of the Tupolev Tu-4 bomber until the Nudelman-Rikhter NR-23 cannon became available. The B-20 was a welcome replacement for the ShVAK because it was significantly lighter - 25 kg (55 lb) to the 40 kg (80 lb) ShVAK - without sacrificing rate of fire or muzzle velocity.

Specifications

Production

The Soviet archives register the following production numbers by year: [1]

See also

Related developments:

Similar weapons:

Notes

  1. Shirokograd, p 119

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References