Bernhard Wise

Last updated

"Australia and its Critics"  . The Empire and the century. London: John Murray. 1905. pp. 424–445.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Ryan, J. A. (1990). "Wise, Bernhard Ringrose (1858-1916)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Vol. 12. Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 5 August 2020 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Serle, Percival (1949). "Wise, Bernhard Ringrose(1858-1916)". Dictionary of Australian Biography . Sydney: Angus and Robertson. Retrieved 29 March 2007.
  3. "Mr B. R. Wise, Q.C." The Daily Telegraph . 5 November 1898. p. 9. Retrieved 8 September 2020 via Trove.
  4. Green, Antony. "1887 South Sydney". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 20 April 2020.
  5. 1 2 3 4 "Mr Bernhard Ringrose Wise (1858-1916)". Former members of the Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 13 May 2019.
  6. Green, Antony. "1889 South Sydney". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 18 April 2020.
  7. Green, Antony. "1891 South Sydney". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 12 April 2020.
  8. Green, Antony. "1894 Sydney-Flinders". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 11 April 2020.
  9. Green, Antony. "1895 Sydney-Flinders". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 9 April 2020.
  10. Green, Antony. "1898 Ashfield". New South Wales Election Results 1856-2007. Parliament of New South Wales . Retrieved 5 April 2020.
  11. "1901 House of Representatives election: New South Wales". Psephos Adam Carr's Election Archive. Retrieved 30 August 2021.
  12. Industrial Arbitration Act 1901 (NSW).
  13. Early Closing Act 1899 (NSW).
  14. Old-age Pensions Act 1900 (NSW).
  15. Women's Franchise Act 1902 (NSW).
  16. "Bernhard Ringrose Wise QC appointed to the Legislative Council". New South Wales Government Gazette . No. 1023. 30 October 1900. p. 8539. Retrieved 28 August 2021 via Trove.
  17. Buck, A R. "Waddell, Thomas (1854?–1940)". Australian Dictionary of Biography . Melbourne University Press. ISSN   1833-7538 . Retrieved 15 August 2020 via National Centre of Biography, Australian National University.
  18. "Mr B R Wise: seat vacant" (pdf). Parliamentary Debates (Hansard) . New South Wales: Legislative Council. 10 March 1908. p. 2.
  19. "Literature and art". Coolgardie Pioneer . Western Australia. 4 February 1899. p. 32. Retrieved 8 September 2020 via Trove.
  20. William Coleman,Their Fiery Cross of Union. A Retelling of the Creation of the Australian Federation, 1889-1914, Connor Court, Queensland, 2021, p. 336.

 

Bernhard Ringrose Wise
QC
B R Wise.jpg
Wise in 1898 at the Australasian Federal Convention, Melbourne
Member of the New South Wales Legislative Assembly
for South Sydney
In office
5 February 1887 19 January 1889
Parliament of New South Wales
Political offices
Preceded by Attorney General
1887 1888
Succeeded by
Preceded by Attorney General
1899 1904
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Justice
1901 1904
Succeeded by
New South Wales Legislative Assembly
Preceded by Member for South Sydney
1887 – 1889
Served alongside: Riley, Toohey, Withers
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member for South Sydney
1891 – 1894
Served alongside: Martin, Traill, Toohey/Manning
Succeeded by
Abolished
Preceded by
New seat
Member for Sydney-Flinders
1894 – 1895
Succeeded by
Preceded by Member for Ashfield
1898 – 1900
Succeeded by
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by Agent-General for New South Wales
1915 1916
Succeeded by

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