Bertha of Burgundy

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Bertha of Burgundy
Bertha of Burgundy.jpg
Queen consort of the Franks
Tenure 996–1000
Born 964
Died 16 January 1010
Spouse Odo I, Count of Blois
Robert II of France
House Elder House of Welf
Father Conrad of Burgundy
Mother Matilda of France

Bertha of Burgundy (964 – 16 January 1010) was the daughter of Conrad the Peaceful, King of Burgundy [1] and his wife Matilda, daughter of Louis IV, King of France and Gerberga of Saxony. She was named for her father's mother, Bertha of Swabia.

Matilda of France Queen of Burgundy

Matilda of France, a member of the Carolingian dynasty, was Queen of Burgundy from about 964 until her death, by her marriage with King Conrad I.

Louis IV of France King of Western Francia

Louis IV, called d'Outremer or Transmarinus, reigned as king of West Francia from 936 to 954. A member of the Carolingian dynasty, he was the only son of king Charles the Simple and his second wife Eadgifu of Wessex, daughter of King Edward the Elder of Wessex. His reign is mostly known thanks to the Annals of Flodoard and the later Historiae of Richerus.

Gerberga of Saxony oldest daughter of King Henry of Saxony, consort of Giselbert of Lorraine and Louis IV of France

Gerberga of Saxony was Regent of France during the minority of her son in 954–959. She was a member of the Ottonian dynasty and a descendant of Charlemagne. Her first husband was Gilbert, Duke of Lorraine. Her second husband was Louis IV of France. Contemporary sources describe her as a highly educated, intelligent and forceful political player.

She first married Odo I, Count of Blois in about 983. [2] They had several children, including Odo II. [1]

Odo I, Count of Blois, Chartres, Reims, Provins, Châteaudun, and Omois, was the son of Theobald I of Blois and Luitgard, daughter of Herbert II of Vermandois. He received the title of count palatine, which was traditional in his family, from King Lothair of West Francia.

Odo II, Count of Blois French nobleman; Count of Blois

Odo II was the Count of Blois, Chartres, Châteaudun, Beauvais and Tours from 1004 and Count of Troyes and Meaux from 1022. He twice tried to make himself a king: first in Italy after 1024 and then in Burgundy after 1032.

After the death of her husband in 996, Bertha's second cousin Robert, co-King of France wished to marry her, in place of his repudiated first wife Rozala, who was many years his senior. The union was opposed by Robert's father, Hugh Capet, due to the potential political problem that could be caused by religious authorities due to their consanguinity. However, the marriage went ahead after Hugh's death in October 996, which left Robert as sole king.

Robert II of France King of France

Robert II, called the Pious or the Wise, was King of the Franks from 996 to 1031, the second from the House of Capet. He was born in Orléans to Hugh Capet and Adelaide of Aquitaine. Robert distinguished himself with an extraordinarily long reign for the time. His 35-year-long reign was marked by his attempts to expand the royal domain by any means, especially by his long struggle to gain the Duchy of Burgundy. His policies earned him many enemies, including three of his sons. He was also known for his difficult marriages: he married three times, annulling two of these and attempting to annul the third, prevented only by the Pope's refusal to accept a third annulment.

Rozala of Italy Frankish queen

Rozala of Italy was a Countess of Flanders and Queen consort of the Franks. She was regent of Flanders in 987-988 during the minority of her son.

Hugh Capet King of the Franks

Hugh Capet was the King of the Franks from 987 to 996. He is the founder and first king from the House of Capet. He was elected as the successor of the last Carolingian king, Louis V. Hugh was a descendant in illegitimate descent of Charlemagne through his mother and paternal grandmother.

The closeness of Robert and Bertha by blood was such that Church authorities considered the marriage illegal since they had not received a dispensation, nor had they requested one. Accordingly, Pope Gregory V declared the pair excommunicated. This, and the lack of children (save one, who lived and died in 999), caused Robert to agree with Pope Silvester II to have the marriage annulled in 1000.

Pope Gregory V Pope from 996 to 999

Pope Gregory V, born Bruno of Carinthia was Pope from 3 May 996 to his death in 999.

Robert next married Constance of Arles while Bertha may have been the Bertha who married Arduin of Ivrea (Arduino d´Ivrea), King of Italy, Marquis of Ivrea.

Constance of Arles Frankish Queen

Constance of Arles, also known as Constance of Provence, was a queen consort of France as the third spouse of King Robert II of France.

Arduin of Ivrea king

Arduin was an Italian nobleman who was Margrave of Ivrea and King of Italy (1002–1014).

Ancestry

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References

  1. 1 2 Stefan Weinfurter, The Salian Century: Main Currents in an Age of Transition, transl. Barbara M. Bowlus, (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999), 46.
  2. Burgundy and Provence 879-1032, Constance Brittain Bourchard, The New Cambridge Medieval History, Vol. III, ed. Timothy Reuter, (Cambridge University Press, 1999), 342.


French royalty
Preceded by
Susanna of Italy
Queen consort of the Franks
996–1000
Succeeded by
Constance of Arles