Bertrade de Montfort

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Bertrade de Montfort
Bertrada Filip.jpg
Bertrade with Philip
Queen consort of the Franks
Tenure15 May 1092 – 29 July 1108
Bornc. 1070
Died14 February 1117 (aged 4647)
Spouse Fulk IV, Count of Anjou
Philip I, King of France
Issue Fulk, King of Jerusalem
Philip, Count of Mantes
Fleury, Seigneur of Nangis
Cecile, Princess of Galilee
House House of Montfort
Father Simon I de Montfort
MotherAgnes of Evreux
Religion Roman Catholicism

Bertrade de Montfort (c. 1070 – 14 February 1117) was a queen consort of France by her marriage to Philip I of France.

Contents

Life

She was the daughter of Simon I de Montfort [1] and Agnes of Evreux. Her brother was Amaury de Montfort.

In speaking of Fulk IV, Count of Anjou, the chronicler John of Marmoutier would recount:

The lecherous Fulk then fell passionately in love with the sister of Amaury de Montfort, whom no good man ever praised save for her beauty.

Bertrade and Fulk were married, [1] and they became the parents of a son, Fulk.

However, in 1092 Bertrade left her husband to live with King Philip I of France. Philip married her on 15 May 1092, despite the fact that they both had spouses living. He was so enamoured of Bertrade that he refused to leave her even when threatened with excommunication. Pope Urban II did excommunicate him in 1095, and Philip was prevented from taking part in the First Crusade.

According to Orderic Vitalis, Bertrade was anxious that one of her sons succeed Philip, and sent a letter to King Henry I of England asking him to arrest her stepson Louis. Orderic also claims she sought to kill Louis, first through the arts of sorcery and then by poison. Whatever the truth of these allegations, Louis succeeded Philip in 1108. William of Malmesbury says:

Bertrade, still young and beautiful, took the veil at Fontevraud Abbey, always charming to men, pleasing to God, and like an angel.

She lived on until 1117.

Her son from her first marriage, Fulk V of Anjou, later became King of Jerusalem iure uxoris . The dynasties founded by Fulk's sons ruled for centuries, one of them in England (Plantagenet), the other in Jerusalem.

Children

With Fulk IV, Count of Anjou:

With Philip I of France:

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References

Sources

French royalty
Preceded by
Bertha of Holland
Queen consort of the Franks
1092–1108
Succeeded by
Adelaide of Maurienne