Berwyn Jones

Last updated

Berwyn Jones
Berwyn Jones - Wakefield Trinity.jpeg
Personal information
Full nameThomas Berwyn Jones
Born13 February 1940
Rhymney, Monmouthshire, Wales
Died11 January 2007 (aged 66)
Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire, England
Playing information
Rugby union
Position Wing
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1964–67 Rhymney
Rugby league
Position Wing
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1964–67 Wakefield Trinity 18947
1967–69 Bradford Northern
1969 St. Helens 42006
Total19349006
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
≤1965–≥65 Commonwealth XIII ≥1
1965 Other Nationalities 1
1964–66 Great Britain 33009
Source: [1]
Medal record
Men's athletics
Representing Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
European Championships
Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 1962 Belgrade 4 × 100 m relay
Representing Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales
British Empire and Commonwealth Games
Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 1962 Perth 4 × 110 yd relay

Thomas Berwyn Jones (13 February 1940 – 12 January 2007) was a Welsh sprint athlete, [2] and rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Rhymney RFC, as a wing, i.e. number 11 or 14, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain, Other Nationalities and Commonwealth XIII, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity (Heritage № 690), Bradford Northern and St Helens, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5. [3]

Contents

Background

Berwyn Jones was born in Rhymney, Monmouthshire, Wales, and he died aged 66 in Ross-on-Wye, Herefordshire, England.

Early career

Jones had a brief career in rugby union with hometown club Rhymney RFC in the South Wales Valleys, but it was in athletics that he looked set to excel until switching to rugby league.

Bronze medal at Belgrade 1962

He won the Bronze medal in the men's 4 x 100 metres relay at the 1962 European Championships in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, alongside Alf Meakin, Ron Jones and David Jones. He also won a bronze medal in the 4 x 100 metres relay while competing for Wales at the 1962 British Empire and Commonwealth Games.

British record holder

He had been touted as a potential Olympian for 1964 when he was invited to try out for Wakefield Trinity in 1964. He had been a member of the Great Britain 4 x 110 yards relay team and a British record-holder (10.3 seconds) and champion over 100 metres.

Rugby league career

Playing under the ironic alias 'A. Walker', he impressed for Wakefield Trinity in reserve team games against Huddersfield and Doncaster and soon took to the sport. Within nine months he was playing for Great Britain, and scored on his international début against France in Perpignan.

Berwyn Jones represented Other Nationalities (RL) while at Wakefield Trinity, he played right wing in the 2-19 defeat by St. Helens at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Wednesday 27 January 1965, to mark the switching-on of new floodlights, [4] represented Commonwealth XIII while at Wakefield Trinity in 1965 against New Zealand at Crystal Palace National Recreation Centre, London on Wednesday 18 August 1965, [5] and was selected for the 1966 tour of Australia and New Zealand but did not make the Test team due to the form of Barrow's William "Bill" Burgess and Geoffrey "Geoff" Wriglesworth of Leeds.

Berwyn Jones played right wing, i.e. number 2, and scored 2-tries in Wakefield Trinity's 18-2 victory over Leeds in the 1964–65 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1964–65 season at Fartown Ground, Huddersfield on Saturday 31 October 1964.

He transferred from Wakefield Trinity to Bradford Northern in 1967/68 for £3,000, where he was joined by Leeds' Geoff Wrigglesworth. The pair formed a potent right wing/centre partnership. Jones scored 26 tries that season, his best haul.

Retirement

He transferred from Bradford Northern to St. Helens during 1969 but scored just two tries before announcing a premature retirement.

He died in January 2007 after a battle with motor neurone disease.

Related Research Articles

Ernest Ward was an English rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s, and coached in the 1950s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, British Empire, Combined Nationalities and England, and at club level for Bradford Northern (captain), and Castleford, as a goal-kicking fullback, centre or second-row, i.e. number 1, 3 or 4, or, 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums, and coached at club level for Castleford. Ernest Ward was a Private in the British Army during World War II.

Montagu(e) Alan Smith is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Brookhouse ARLFC, and Leeds, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5.

Ken Traill English RL coach and former GB & England international rugby league footballer

Kenneth Traill was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s and 1950s, and coached in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Hunslet, Bradford Northern, Halifax and Wakefield Trinity, as a loose forward, and coached at club level for Wakefield Trinity.

Jack Wilkinson was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1960s. A Halifax and Wakefield Trinity Hall of Fame inductee, he was a Great Britain and England international forward. Wilkinson also represented Yorkshire, and ended his career as captain-coach of Bradford Northern.

Geoffrey Clarkson English rugby union & league footballer

Geoffrey "Geoff" Clarkson was an English rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for Yorkshire, and at club level for Wakefield RFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Yorkshire, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity, Bradford Northern, Leigh, Warrington, Leeds, York, Bramley, Hull Kingston Rovers, Oldham and Featherstone Rovers, as a second-row, i.e. number 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums.

Donald "Don" George Vines was a Welsh rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s, and a heel wrestler in professional wrestling of the 1960s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Newbridge RFC, as a centre, or later in the forwards, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain, Wales and Other Nationalities, and at club level for Oldham, Wakefield Trinity, and St. Helens, as a prop, second-row, or loose forward, i.e. number 8 or 10, 11 or 12, or 13, during the era of contested scrums.

Milan Kosanović Serbian Yugoslav rugby league footballer

Milan Kosanović, also known by the nickname of "Milo", was a Yugoslav Serb professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at representative level for English League XIII and Yorkshire, and at club level for Bradford Northern, Wakefield Trinity and Featherstone Rovers, as a hooker, i.e. number 9, during the era of contested scrums.

Ian Brooke is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s, and coached in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity (captain), and Bradford Northern, as a wing, or centre, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4, and coached at club level for Bradford Northern, Wakefield Trinity, Huddersfield and Doncaster.

Thomas "Tommy" Smales was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s, and coached in the 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Castleford, Huddersfield (captain), Bradford Northern, North Sydney Bears and Wakefield Trinity as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7, and coached at club level for Castleford and Featherstone Rovers.

Stan Brogden GB & England international rugby league footballer

Stanley "Stan" Brogden was an English rugby union, and professional sprinter and rugby league footballer who played in the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s. He played representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Bradford Northern, Huddersfield, Leeds, Hull FC, Rochdale Hornets, St Helens R.F.C. and Salford, as a wing, centre, or stand-off, i.e. number 2 or 5, 3 or 4, or 6, and representative level rugby union (RU) for British Empire Forces,

Eric Batten English RL coach and former GB & England international rugby league footballer

Frederick "Eric" E. Batten was an English rugby union and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, and coached rugby league in the 1950s. He played club level rugby league (RU) for Sandal RUFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity, Hunslet, Featherstone Rovers (captain), Leeds, Castleford and Bradford Northern, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5, and coached at club level for Featherstone Rovers, and Batley. Eric Batten appeared in eight Challenge Cup Finals; two for Leeds, five for Bradford Northern, and one for Featherstone Rovers, winning three, and losing five, he scored a total of 443 tries during his career, he his third on the all-time try scorers list behind Brian Bevan, and Billy Boston,

Peter E. Small is an English former rugby union and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. He played club level rugby union (RU) for Castleford RUFC, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Great Britain and Yorkshire, and at club level for Allerton Bywater ARLFC, Castleford, Hull Kingston Rovers and Bradford Northern, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5, and later as a second-row, i.e. number 11 or 12, during the era of contested scrums.

Barry Seabourne is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s, and coached in the 1980s and 1990s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and England, and at club level for Leeds (captain), and Bradford Northern, as a scrum-half, i.e. number 7, and coached at club level for Bradford Northern and Huddersfield.

Geoffrey "Geoff" W. Wriglesworth is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Heworth A.R.L.F.C., Leeds, Bradford Northern, Hull Kingston Rovers, Wakefield Trinity, and York, as a wing, or centre, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4.

David "Dave" Barends is a South African professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain and Other Nationalities, and at club level for Wakefield Trinity, Bradford Northern, York and Featherstone Rovers, as a wing, i.e. number 2 or 5.

David Smith is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for England and Yorkshire, and at club level for Shaw Cross Sharks ARLFC, Wakefield Trinity, Leeds, Bradford Northern, Workington Town and Carlisle as a wing, or centre, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4.

Terence "Terry" A. Clawson was an English World Cup winning professional rugby league footballer who played from the 1950s through to the 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain between 1962 and 1974, and was part of the 1972 Rugby League World Cup winning squad. He also played for Yorkshire, and at club level for Featherstone Rovers (captain), Bradford Northern, Leeds, Hull Kingston Rovers, Oldham, York, Wakefield Trinity, Hull FC and South Newcastle, as a goal-kicking prop or second-row, i.e. number 8 or 10, or, 11 or 12. He coached at club level for South Newcastle and Featherstone Rovers.

Ronald "Ron"/"Ronnie" C. Cowan is a Scottish former rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1960s and 1970s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for the British Lions, and Scotland, and at club level for Selkirk RFC, as a wing, i.e. number 11 or 14, and representative level rugby league (RL) for Other Nationalities, and at club level for Leeds and Hull F.C., as a wing, or centre, i.e. number 2 or 5, or, 3 or 4.

Jack Bartholomew English rugby league footballer

John Bartholomew was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1900s, 1910s and 1920s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, and at club level for Morecambe, Huddersfield and Bradford Northern as a fullback, wing, centre or stand-off, i.e. number 1, 2 or 5, 3 or 4, or 6. Jack Bartholomew was the uncle of the comedian Eric Morecambe.

Dale Fennell is an English former professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain (Under-24s), and at club level for Featherstone Rovers, Wakefield Trinity, Bradford Northern and Huddersfield (loan), as a stand-off or scrum-half, i.e. number 6, or 7.

References

  1. "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. "Hall of Fame Athletes " Berwyn Jones". uka.org.uk. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 12 October 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  3. Graham Williams, Peter Lush, David Farrar (November 2009). "The British Rugby League Records Book [Page-108…114]". London League Publications Ltd. ISBN   978-1-903659-49-6
  4. Cook, H.B. (1965). Programme - St. Helens versus Other Nationalities. St. Helens Rugby F.C. Ltd.
  5. "…and win at Crystal Palace". totalrl.com. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 19 January 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2012.