Betty Nuthall

Last updated

Betty Nuthall
Betty Nuthall 1932.jpg
Full nameElizabeth May Nuthall Shoemaker
Country (sports)Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  United Kingdom
Born(1911-05-23)23 May 1911
Surbiton, England
Died8 November 1983(1983-11-08) (aged 72)
New York City, USA
PlaysRight-handed
Int. Tennis HoF 1977 (member page)
Singles
Highest rankingNo. 4 (1929)
Grand Slam Singles results
French Open F (1931)
Wimbledon 4R (1933, 1937, 1938, 1946)
US Open W (1930)
Doubles
Grand Slam Doubles results
French Open W (1931)
US Open W (1930, 1931, 1933)
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
French Open W (1931, 1932)
US Open W (1929, 1931)
Team competitions
Wightman Cup (1928)

Betty May Nuthall Shoemaker (née Nuthall; 23 May 1911 – 8 November 1983) was an English tennis player. Known for her powerful forehand, according to Wallis Myers of The Daily Telegraph and the Daily Mail , Nuthall was ranked in the world top ten in 1927, 1929 through 1931, and 1933, reaching a career high in those rankings of World No. 4 in 1929. [1] She won the mixed doubles championships at the French Open in 1931 with Pat Spence.

Tennis Ball sport with racket and net

Tennis is a racket sport that can be played individually against a single opponent (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles). Each player uses a tennis racket that is strung with cord to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over or around a net and into the opponent's court. The object of the game is to maneuver the ball in such a way that the opponent is not able to play a valid return. The player who is unable to return the ball will not gain a point, while the opposite player will.

<i>The Daily Telegraph</i> British daily broadsheet newspaper

The Daily Telegraph, known online as The Telegraph, is a national British daily broadsheet newspaper published in London by Telegraph Media Group and distributed across the United Kingdom and internationally. It was founded by Arthur B. Sleigh in 1855 as Daily Telegraph & Courier.

<i>Daily Mail</i> British daily middle-market tabloid newspaper published in London

The Daily Mail is a British daily middle-market newspaper published in London in a tabloid format. Founded in 1896, it is the United Kingdom's third-highest-circulation daily newspaper, after Metro and The Sun. Its sister paper The Mail on Sunday was launched in 1982, while Scottish and Irish editions of the daily paper were launched in 1947 and 2006 respectively. Content from the paper appears on the MailOnline website, although the website is managed separately and has its own editor.

Contents

Career

Betty Nuthall in 1932 Betty Nuthall.jpg
Betty Nuthall in 1932

Nuthall's father taught her tennis. She won the junior championships of Great Britain in 1924 (aged 13), 1925 and 1926.

In 1927 at the age of 16, Nuthall tied Elisabeth Moore as the then-youngest women's singles finalist ever at the U. S. National Championships. Nuthall lost the final to Helen Wills in straight sets while serving under-handed. [2] [3]

Elisabeth Moore American tennis player

Elisabeth 'Bessie' Holmes Moore was an American tennis champion who was active at the beginning of the 20th century. Moore won the singles title at the U.S. Championships on four occasions. She was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1971.

Helen Wills American tennis player

Helen Newington Wills, also known as Helen Wills Moody and Helen Wills Roark, was an American tennis player. She became famous around the world for holding the top position in women's tennis for a total of nine years: 1927–33, 1935 and 1938. She won 31 Grand Slam tournament titles during her career, including 19 singles titles.

Also in 1927, Nuthall played on the British Wightman Cup team and defeated Helen Jacobs in her debut. In her mixed doubles matches, the final of the Nottingham Championships, she won with her partner Pat Spence. [4] She also represented Great Britain in the 1929 and 1931–34 Wightman Cup competitions.

The Wightman Cup was an annual team tennis competition for women contested from 1923 through 1989 between teams from the United States and Great Britain.

Helen Jacobs American tennis player

Helen Hull Jacobs was an American tennis player who won nine Grand Slam titles. She was born in Globe, Arizona, United States.

Pat Spence South African tennis player

Patrick Spence was a South African tennis player. He was born in Queenstown, South Africa. He competed mainly in Great Britain and found his form in hard court tournaments. He notably won the mixed doubles championships at Wimbledon in 1928 with Elizabeth Ryan and at the French Open in 1931 with Betty Nuthall.

In 1930, Nuthall became the first non-American since 1892 to win a women's singles title at the U. S. National Championships, defeating Anna McCune Harper in straight sets. [5] She was the last British female player to win the title until Virginia Wade won in 1968. In 1931, she reached the singles final of the French International Championships but lost in two sets to first-seeded Cilly Aussem. Also in 1930, she won the mixed doubles with her recurring partner Spence. [6] Nuthall and he went for the British Hard Court Championships in April and were only eliminated in the final, [7] while in May they won the mixed title at the French International Championships. [8]

Anna McCune Harper was an American female tennis player. She won the mixed doubles title at Wimbledon in 1931 partnering George Lott. She was the runner-up in singles at the 1930 U.S. Championships, losing to Betty Nuthall. She also was the runner-up in women's doubles at the 1928, 1930, and 1932 U.S. Championships and in mixed doubles at the 1931 edition of those championships.

Sarah Virginia Wade, is a former professional tennis player from Great Britain. She won three Grand Slam singles championships and four Grand Slam doubles championships, and is the only British woman in history to have won titles at all four Grand Slam tournaments. She was ranked as high as No. 2 in the world in singles, and No. 1 in the world in doubles.

French Open French Open Tennis Championships

The French Open, officially Roland-Garros, is a major tennis tournament held over two weeks at the Stade Roland-Garros in Paris, France, beginning in late May. The venue is named after the French aviator Roland Garros. It is the premier clay court tennis championship event in the world and the second of four annual Grand Slam tournaments, the other three being the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open. The French Open is currently the only Grand Slam event held on clay, and it is the zenith of the spring clay court season. Because of the seven rounds needed for a championship, the slow-playing surface and the best-of-five-set men's singles matches, the event is widely considered to be the most physically demanding tennis tournament in the world.

At the U.S. Championships in 1933, Nuthall won a quarterfinal versus Alice Marble 6–8, 6–0, 7–5 after being down two breaks of serve at 1–5 in the final set. In the semifinal versus Moody, Nuthall won the first set 6–2 in just 12 minutes, which was the first set Wills had lost at this tournament since 1926. Moody, however, turned around the match and won the last two sets 6–3, 6–2 despite losing her serve twice in the second set. Nuthall never again reached the quarterfinals of a Grand Slam singles tournament.

Alice Marble American tennis player

Alice Marble was an American tennis player who won 18 Grand Slam championships (1936–40): five in singles, six in women's doubles, and seven in mixed doubles.

Nuthall won women's doubles titles at the 1930, 1931, and 1933 U.S. Championships and at the 1931 French Championships. She won mixed doubles championships at the 1929 and 1931 U.S. Championships and at the 1931 and 1932 French Championships.

Nuthall was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1977. [2]

International Tennis Hall of Fame Professional sports hall of fame; museum in Newport, Rhode Island

The International Tennis Hall of Fame is located in Newport, Rhode Island, United States. It honors both players and other contributors to the sport of tennis. The complex, the former Newport Casino, includes a museum, grass tennis courts, an indoor tennis facility, and a court tennis facility.

Personal life

She formed a real-life couple with her doubles partner Pat Spence, [9] [10] with whom she went on to win the French Open mixed doubles tournament in 1931. [8] In 1954 she married Franklin Shoemaker, who died in 1982. On 8 November 1983 Nuthall died in New York of a coronary arrest. [11]

Grand Slam finals

Singles: 3 (1 title, 2 runners-up)

ResultYearChampionshipSurfaceOpponentScore
Loss1927 U.S. Championships Grass Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Helen Wills 1–6, 4–6
Win1930 U.S. Championships Grass Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Anna McCune Harper 6–1, 6–4
Loss1931 French Championships Clay Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg Cilly Aussem 6–8, 1–6

Doubles (4 titles, 2 runners-up)

ResultYearChampionshipSurfacePartnerOpponentsScore
Loss 1927 U.S. National Championships Grass Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Joan Fry Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Kitty McKane
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Ermyntrude Harvey
1–6, 6–4, 4–6
Win 1930 U.S. National Championships Grass Flag of the United States.svg Sarah Palfrey Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Edith Cross
Flag of the United States.svg Anna McCune Harper
3–6, 6–3, 7–5
Win 1931 French Championships Clay Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Eileen Bennett Whittingstall Flag of Germany (3-2 aspect ratio).svg Cilly Aussem
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Elizabeth Ryan
9–7, 6–2
Win 1931 U.S. National Championships Grass Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Eileen Bennett Whittingstall Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Helen Jacobs
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Dorothy Round
6–2, 6–4
Loss 1932 French Championships Clay Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Eileen Bennett Whittingstall Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Elizabeth Ryan
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Helen Wills
1–6, 3–6
Win 1933 U.S. National Championships Grass Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Freda James Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Elizabeth Ryan
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Helen Wills
default

Mixed doubles (4 titles, 1 runner-up)

ResultYearChampionshipSurfacePartnerOpponentsScore
Win 1929 U.S. National Championships Grass Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg George Lott Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Phyllis Covell
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Bunny Austin
6–3, 6–3
Win 1931 French Championships Clay Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Patrick Spence Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Dorothy Shepherd
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Bunny Austin
6–3, 5–7, 6–3
Win 1931 U.S. National Championships Grass Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg George Lott Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Anna McCune Harper
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Wilmer Allison
6–3, 6–3
Win 1932 French Championships Clay Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Fred Perry Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Helen Wills
Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Sidney Wood
6–4, 6–2
Loss 1933 French Championships Grass Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Fred Perry Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Margaret Scriven
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Jack Crawford
2–6, 3–6

Grand Slam singles tournament timeline

Key
W F SFQF#RRRQ#ANH
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (NH) not held. SR=strike rate (events won/competed)
Tournament1926192719281929193019311932193319341935193619371938193919401941 – 1944194519461Career SR
Australian Championships AAAAAAAAAAAAAAANHNHA0 / 0
French Championships AA 2R AA F SF SF 3R AAAAANHRAA0 / 5
Wimbledon 2R QF 1R 3R QF QF QF 4R 1R A 2R 4R 4R 1R NHNHNH 4R 0 / 14
U.S. Championships A F A QF W SF A SF 2R AAAA 3R AAAA1 / 7
SR0 / 10 / 20 / 20 / 21 / 20 / 30 / 20 / 30 / 30 / 00 / 10 / 10 / 10 / 20 / 00 / 00 / 00 / 11 / 26

R = tournament restricted to French nationals and held under German occupation.

1In 1946, the French Championships were held after Wimbledon.

See also

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References

  1. Collins, Bud (2008). The Bud Collins History of Tennis: An Authoritative Encyclopedia and Record Book. New York: New Chapter Press. pp. 695, 701–2. ISBN   0-942257-41-3.
  2. 1 2 "Hall of Famers – Betty Nuthall Shoemaker". International Tennis Hall of Fame & Museum.
  3. Allison Danzig (31 August 1927). "Miss Wills Regains U.S. Tennis Crown". The New York Times.
  4. "Mrs. Beamish does well at Nottingham". Kingston Gleaner. Kingston, Jamaica: Gleaner Company. XCIV (200): 34. 31 August 1928. Retrieved 21 October 2012.
  5. "BETTY NUTHALL". The Advertiser . Adelaide, Australia. 26 August 1930. p. 9 via National Library of Australia.
  6. Béla Kehrling, ed. (22 March 1930). "Külföldi hírek" [International news](pdf). Tennisz és Golf (in Hungarian). Budapest, Hungary: Bethlen Gábor Irod. és Nyomdai RT. II (6): 97. Retrieved 22 October 2012.
  7. Béla Kehrling, ed. (15 May 1931). "Külföldi hírek" [International news](PDF). Tennisz és Golf (in Hungarian). Budapest, Hungary: Egyesült Kő-, Könyvnyomda. Könyv- és Lapkiadó Rt. III (10): 186. Retrieved 21 October 2012.
  8. 1 2 John Grasso (2011). Historical Dictionary of Tennis. Lanham, Maryland, United States: Scarecrow Press. pp. 333, 357. ISBN   9780810872370 . Retrieved 19 October 2012.
  9. "Miss Nuthall and Dr. Spence". The Singapore Free Press and Mercantile Advertiser . Singapore: Mohammed Eunos: 12. 27 January 1930. Retrieved 21 October 2012.
  10. "Betty Engaged? That's What England Hears" (pdf). Evening Leader . Corning, NY. Associated Press: 9. 25 January 1930.
  11. Thomas Rogers (10 November 1983). "Betty Nuthall, 72; British Tennis Star Captured U.S. Title". The New York Times .