Bhogi

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Bhogi
Official nameBhogi
TypeSeasonal, traditional
SignificanceMidwinter festival
CelebrationsBonfire
Begins13 January
Date 13 January
Related to Makar Sankranti
Bihu (Bhogali / Magh / Bhogi in Tamil)
lohri
Bhogi fire at Sri Balakrishna Towers, Gorantla, Guntur Bhogi fire.jpg
Bhogi fire at Sri Balakrishna Towers, Gorantla, Guntur

Bhogi is the first day of the four-day Makara Sankranti festival. According to the Gregorian calendar it is usually celebrated on 13 January. It is a festival celebrated widely in Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana ,Karnataka and Maharashtra

On Bhogi, people discard old and derelict things and concentrate on new things causing change or transformation. At dawn, people light a bonfire with logs of wood, other solid-fuels and wooden furniture at home that are no longer useful to start the fresh accounts from next day which is the day one of the harvest. [1]

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References

  1. "About Bogi Festival | Bhogi Festival | Bhogi Celebrations". 1 January 2017.