Biafran pound

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Biafran pound
Biafran 2 1/2 shilling coin from 1969 of aluminium..JPG Biafran 2 1/2 shilling coin from 1969 of aluminium II..JPG
Biafran 2+12 shilling coin from 1969; aluminium, reverse.Biafran 2+12 shilling coin from 1969; aluminium, obverse.
Unit
Symbol £
Denominations
Subunit
120shilling
1240 penny
Plural
penny pence
Symbol
shillings or /–
penny d
Banknotes5/–, 10/–, £1, £5, £10
Coins3d, 6d, 1/–, 2/6
Demographics
User(s) Biafra
Issuance
Central bank Bank of Biafra
This infobox shows the latest status before this currency was rendered obsolete.

The pound (symbol £) was the currency of the breakaway Republic of Biafra between 1968 and 1970.

Contents

The first notes, in denominations of 5/– and £1, were introduced on January 29, 1968. [1] A series of coins was issued in 1969; 3d, 6d, 1/–, and 2/6 coins were minted, all struck in aluminium. In February 1969, a second family of notes was issued in denominations of 5/– and 10/–, £1, £5 and £10. Despite not being recognised currency by the rest of the world when issued, the banknotes were afterwards sold as curios (typically at an eighth of their face value: 2/6 (=£0.125 stg) for Biafran £1 notes when sold in British notaphily shops), and are now traded among banknote collectors at well above their original nominal value.

The most commonly found notes are the 1968 and 1969 £1 notes, with the £10 note and all coins being rare.

Banknotes of the Biafran pound (1968 "First" issue)
ImageValueObverseReverse
5/–Palm tree over a rising sunFour Biafran girls
£1Palm tree over a rising sunCoat of arms of Biafra
Banknotes of the Biafran pound (1969 "Second" issue)
ImageValueObverseReverse
5/–Palm tree over a rising sunFour Biafran girls
10/–Palm tree over a rising sunOil refinery
£1Palm tree over a rising sunCoat of arms of Biafra
£5Palm tree over a rising sunA female weaver
£10Palm tree over a rising sunA male carver

See also

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References

  1. Linzmayer, Owen (2011). "Biafra". The Banknote Book. San Francisco, CA: www.BanknoteNews.com. Retrieved 2011-08-21.