Big Three (Portugal)

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The Big Three (Portuguese : Os Três Grandes) is the nickname of the three most successful football clubs in Portugal. [1] The teams of S.L. Benfica and Sporting CP, both from Lisbon, and of FC Porto, from Porto, have a great rivalry and are usually the main contenders for the Primeira Liga title. They share all but two of the Portuguese Football Championships ever played, and generally end up sharing the top three positions. None of them have been relegated from the Primeira Liga either, having been participants in all editions since its first season in 1934–35. Benfica's lowest position was 6th in 2000–01, while Porto's 9th place finish in 1969–70 makes the closest any side has come to relegation. Sporting's worst finish was a 7th place finish in 2012–13.

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Benfica and Porto are the only Portuguese teams to have won the European Cup/UEFA Champions League, which they have both won on two occasions. The closest Sporting came was in 1983, when they reached the quarter-finals.

The only two clubs outside the Big Three to have won the Portuguese league are Belenenses, in the 1945–46 season, and Boavista, in the 2000–01 campaign. Belenenses has been relegated four times to the second tier, while Boavista has been in the third tier twice.

Portugal location map.svg
Location of the three clubs in Portugal

The three-way rivalry

Benfica vs. Sporting:

Benfica vs. Porto:

Porto vs. Sporting:

Statistics

League placements

Club1st2nd3rd4th5th6th7th8th9thTotalTop 3
Benfica372917418782
Porto3028121231118769
Sporting19213013418769

Honours comparison

International competitionBenficaPortoSporting CP
European Cup / UEFA Champions League 220
UEFA Cup / UEFA Europa League 020
European / UEFA Super Cup 010
Intercontinental Cup 020
European Cup Winners' Cup 001
National competitionBenficaPortoSporting CP
Portuguese League 373019
Portuguese Cup 261817
Championship of Portugal 344
Portuguese League Cup 704
Portuguese Super Cup 8239
Total838254

Footballers who have played for the three clubs

Eight footballers have played for Benfica, Porto, and Sporting. Of those, only Eurico Gomes won the domestic league for all three (twice with each club). Additionally, Eurico is also the only player to enter the following list without having played for another club in-between his Big Three career. [2]

Managers who managed all three clubs

See also

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References

  1. ""Sou o único campeão pelos três grandes. Em Inglaterra seria um herói, aqui sou um desempregado"" (in Portuguese). Expresso. 29 April 2016. Retrieved 16 May 2017.
  2. "Futebol: Maniche faz o pleno dos três grandes em Portugal" (in Portuguese). Jornal Mundo Português. 12 September 2010. Retrieved 16 May 2017.