Bill Dooley

Last updated
Bill Dooley
Biographical details
Born(1934-05-19)May 19, 1934
Mobile, Alabama
DiedAugust 9, 2016(2016-08-09) (aged 82)
Wilmington, North Carolina
Playing career
1953–1955 Mississippi State
Position(s) Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1957–1960 Mississippi State (freshmen, asst. OL)
1963 Mississippi State (OL)
1964–1966 Georgia (OC)
1967–1977 North Carolina
1978–1986 Virginia Tech
1987–1992 Wake Forest
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
1978–1986 Virginia Tech
Head coaching record
Overall162–126–5
Bowls3–7
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
3 ACC (1971–1972, 1977)
Awards
ACC Coach of the Year (1971, 1987, 1992)
North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame (1995)

William Gerald Dooley (May 19, 1934 – August 9, 2016) was an American football player, coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1967–1977), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (1978–1986), and Wake Forest University (1987–1992), compiling a career college football record of 162–126–5.

Contents

Early life and family

Dooley was born in 1934, in Mobile, Alabama. There, he attended the McGill Institute, administered by the Brothers of the Sacred Heart. Dooley then attended Perkinston Junior College in Perkinston, Mississippi from 1952 to 1953. In 1953, he moved on to Mississippi State University and graduated in 1956, where he was an all-SEC lineman for the Maroons/Bulldogs. Dooley's brother is former University of Georgia head football coach Vince Dooley, and the two went against each other's teams in the 1971 Gator Bowl. [1] His nephew, Derek Dooley is the former head football coach at the University of Tennessee. He resided in Wilmington, North Carolina. Dooley was married to Marie Dooley. He has four sons; Jim Dooley and Billy Dooley from his first marriage to Chris Dooley and Sean Dooley and Ashton Dooley, M.S. from his second marriage to Marie Dooley.

Coaching and administrative career

With the North Carolina Tar Heels, Dooley won three Atlantic Coast Conference titles, including the school's first outright conference championship in 1971. As a result, Dooley has the most Atlantic Coast Conference titles of any North Carolina Tar Heels football coach. He left North Carolina as the winningest coach in school history, since surpassed by Dick Crum and Mack Brown. Dooley is still the school's longest consecutively tenured head coach and second longest tenured coach overall. He also achieved the school's first 11-win season in 1972. Only three other Tar Heel teams have ever won 11 games.

After his tenure at North Carolina, Dooley served as the athletic director and head football coach at Virginia Tech. He led the Hokies to three bowl games—as many as they had attended in their entire history prior to his arrival. His best team was the 1986 unit, which went 9–2–1 and won the Peach Bowl. That team was later awarded a 10th win after Temple forfeited its entire 1986 schedule—including a 29-13 win over the Hokies—due to an ineligible player. [2] Thus Dooley "officially" owns Virginia Tech's first-ever 10-win season.

Dooley (middle) with his defensive coordinator Tom Harper (left) Bill Dooley and Tom Harper.jpg
Dooley (middle) with his defensive coordinator Tom Harper (left)

His tenure at Virginia Tech, however, ended shortly afterward amidst allegations of NCAA recruiting violations. After resigning from his positions at Virginia Tech, he sued the university for $3,500,000 alleging breach of contract. The lawsuit was settled out of court. At the time, he was the winningest coach in school history, though he has since been surpassed by his successor, Frank Beamer. [3]

Finally, Dooley served as the head coach at Wake Forest where, as of 2020, he is fourth in the football program's history for all-time wins. Furthermore, he is tied with Paul Amen for the most Atlantic Coast Conference Coach of the Year awards in school history (2).

Awards and honors

Dooley was inducted in the Mobile Sports Hall of Fame in 1993, North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame in 1995, and the Greater Wilmington Sports Hall of Fame in 2011. The NFFCHOF Bill Dooley Chapter, located in the Raleigh-Durham area, was established in 1995 and is named in Dooley's honor.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
North Carolina Tar Heels (Atlantic Coast Conference)(1967–1977)
1967 North Carolina 2–82–57th
1968 North Carolina 3–71–68th
1969 North Carolina 5–53–3T–3rd
1970 North Carolina 8–45–2T–2ndL Peach
1971 North Carolina 9–36–01stL Gator 18
1972 North Carolina 11–16–01stW Sun 1412
1973 North Carolina 4–71–56th
1974 North Carolina 7–54–2T–2ndL Sun
1975 North Carolina 3–7–11–4–16th
1976 North Carolina 9–34–12ndL Peach
1977 North Carolina 8–3–15–0–11stL Liberty 1417
North Carolina:69–53–238–28–2
Virginia Tech Gobblers / Hokies (NCAA Division I-A Independent)(1978–1986)
1978 Virginia Tech 4–7
1979 Virginia Tech 5–6
1980 Virginia Tech 8–4L Peach
1981 Virginia Tech 7–4
1982 Virginia Tech 7–4
1983 Virginia Tech 9–2
1984 Virginia Tech 8–4L Independence
1985 Virginia Tech 6–5
1986 Virginia Tech 10–2–1W Peach 20
Virginia Tech:64–38–1
Wake Forest Demon Deacons (Atlantic Coast Conference)(1987–1992)
1987 Wake Forest 7–44–3T–3rd
1988 Wake Forest 6–4–14–3T–4th
1989 Wake Forest 2–8–11–67th
1990 Wake Forest 3–80–78th
1991 Wake Forest 3–81–6T–7th
1992 Wake Forest 8–44–4T–4thW Independence 2525
Wake Forest:29–36–214–29
Total:163–126–5
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

Related Research Articles

Frank Beamer American football coach

Franklin Mitchell Beamer is a retired American college football coach, most notably for the Virginia Tech Hokies, and former college football player. Beamer was a cornerback for Virginia Tech from 1966 to 1968. His coaching experience began in 1972, and from 1981 to 1986 Beamer served as the head football coach at Murray State University. He then went on to become the head football coach at Virginia Tech from 1987 until his final game in 2015. He was one of the longest tenured active coaches in NCAA Division I FBS and, at the time of his retirement, was the winningest active coach at that level. Upon retiring, Beamer accepted a position as special assistant to the Virginia Tech athletic director, where he focuses on athletic development and advancement. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2018.

George Welsh was an American college football player and coach. He served as head football coach of the Navy Midshipmen football team of the United States Naval Academy from 1973 to 1981, and the Virginia Cavaliers football team of the University of Virginia from 1982 to 2000.

Butch Davis American football coach

Paul Hilton "Butch" Davis Jr. is an American football coach. He is the head football coach at Florida International University. After graduating from the University of Arkansas, he became an assistant college football coach at Oklahoma State University and the University of Miami before becoming the defensive coordinator for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League (NFL). He was head coach of the University of Miami's Hurricanes football team from 1995 to 2000 and the NFL's Cleveland Browns from 2001 to 2004. Davis served as the head coach of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) Tar Heels football team from 2007 until the summer of 2011, when a series of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) investigations resulted in his dismissal. He was hired by the NFL's Tampa Bay Buccaneers as an advisor in February 2012.

John Bunting (American football) American football player and coach

John Stephen Bunting is a former head American football coach at the University of North Carolina as well as a former National Football League (NFL) player. He was inducted to the Greater Wilmington Sports Hall of Fame in 2016.

Virginia Tech Hokies

The Virginia Tech Hokies are the athletic teams officially representing the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in intercollegiate athletics. The Hokies participate in the NCAA's Division I Atlantic Coast Conference in 22 varsity sports. Virginia Tech's men's sports are football, basketball, baseball, cross country, golf, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor and outdoor track and field, and wrestling. Virginia Tech's women's sports are basketball, cross country, lacrosse, soccer, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, indoor and outdoor track and field, golf, and volleyball.

Virginia Cavaliers football College football team representing the University of Virginia

The Virginia Cavaliers football team represents the University of Virginia in the sport of American football. Established in 1888, Virginia plays its home games at Scott Stadium, capacity 61,500, featured directly on its campus near the Academical Village. UVA played an outsized role in the shaping of the modern game's ethics and eligibility rules as well as its safety rules, after a Georgia fullback died fighting the tide of a lopsided Virginia victory in 1897.

North Carolina Tar Heels football College Football Bowl Subdivision team; member of Atlantic Coast Conference

The North Carolina Tar Heels football team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the sport of American football. The Tar Heels play in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC).

Charles Moir American basketball coach

Charles Robert Moir was an American college basketball coach. He was the head coach of the Virginia Tech Hokies men's basketball team from 1976 until his resignation in October 1987. During his 11 seasons at Virginia Tech, Moir's Hokies compiled a 213–119 record. He was forced to resign after the discovery of severe NCAA violations. Including his time at Tech and coaching stints in high school and at Roanoke College and Tulane University, Moir compiled a career record of 616–238 in his 31 seasons as a high school and college head coach.

Virginia Tech Hokies football

The Virginia Tech Hokies football team represents Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in the sport of American football. The Hokies compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They previously competed in the Big East. Their home games are played at Lane Stadium, located in Blacksburg, Virginia with a seating capacity of over 65,000 fans. Lane Stadium is considered to be one of the loudest stadiums in the country, being voted number one in ESPN's "Top 20 Scariest Places to Play". Also, it was recognized in 2005 by Rivals.com as having the best home-field advantage in the country.

2008 Virginia Tech Hokies football team American college football season

The 2008 Virginia Tech Hokies football team represented Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University during the 2008 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team's head coach was Frank Beamer. Prior to the season, the Hokies were expected to be in a rebuilding mode, recovering after the graduation of several key players. Despite that fact, Tech was picked to win the Atlantic Coast Conference's Coastal Division in the annual preseason poll of media covering the ACC. The Hokies were ranked the No. 15 team in the country at the start of the season, but suffered an upset loss to East Carolina in their first game. Tech recovered, however, and won five consecutive games following the loss, the ACC Championship, and the Orange Bowl.

The 1986 Peach Bowl was a post-season American college football bowl game at Fulton County Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia between the Virginia Tech Hokies and the North Carolina State Wolfpack from on December 31, 1986. The game was the final contest of the 1986 NCAA Division I-A football season for both teams, and ended in a 25–24 victory for Virginia Tech, the first bowl victory in school history.

The 1998 Gator Bowl was a post-season American college football bowl game between the Virginia Tech Hokies from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and the North Carolina Tar Heels from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The 53rd edition of the Gator Bowl, it was played at Alltel Stadium in Jacksonville, Florida, on January 1, 1998. The game was the final contest of the 1997 NCAA Division I-A football season for both teams, and ended in a 42–3 victory for North Carolina.

The 1997 North Carolina Tar Heels football team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill during the 1997 NCAA Division I-A football season. The Tar Heels played their home games at Kenan Memorial Stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and competed in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The team was coached by Mack Brown finished the season 11–1 overall, 7–1 in the conference.

Harlan Sanborn

Harlan P. Sanborn was best known for being the head coach of the Virginia Tech Hokies men's basketball team and the North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team.

The 2011 North Carolina Tar Heels football team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The team was led by interim head coach Everett Withers and played their home games at Kenan Memorial Stadium, and members of the Atlantic Coast Conference in the Coastal Division. The Tar Heels finished the season 7–6, 3–5 in ACC play to finish tied for fourth in the Coastal Division, and were invited to the Independence Bowl where they were defeated by Missouri, 24–41.

David (Dave) Braine held the position of athletics director at the Georgia Tech from 1997 to 2006 and Virginia Tech from 1988 to 1997. Braine significantly improved the athletic programs at both schools and increased support of student athletes with more focus on academics and life skills.

The history of Duke Blue Devils football began in 1888, when Duke University first fielded a football team.

References

  1. "SEC, ACC college football previews". September 2, 2016. Retrieved September 3, 2016.
  2. http://articles.sun-sentinel.com/1988-07-26/sports/8802130506_1_paul-palmer-western-michigan-temple
  3. Gast, Dorothy (November 5, 1986). "Committee urges higher standards at Virginia Tech". The Free Lance–Star . Retrieved December 26, 2010.