Bill Fetzer

Last updated
Bill Fetzer
William M Fetzer.jpg
Pictured in Quips and Cranks 1917, Davidson yearbook
Biographical details
Born(1884-06-24)June 24, 1884
Concord, North Carolina
DiedMay 3, 1959(1959-05-03) (aged 74)
Franklin, North Carolina
Playing career
Baseball
1905–1906 Davidson
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1915–1918 Davidson
1919–1920 NC State
1921–1925 North Carolina
Basketball
1916–1918 Davidson
Baseball
1915–1919 Davidson
1920 NC State
1921–1925 North Carolina
Head coaching record
Overall61–28–7 (football)
18–11 (basketball)
128–75–5 (baseball)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Football
1 SoCon (1922)

William McKinnon Fetzer (June 24, 1884 – May 3, 1959), also commonly known as Bill and Willy, was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Davidson College (1915–1918), North Carolina State University (1919–1920), and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1921–1925), compiling a career college football record of 61–28–7. His brother, Bob Fetzer, served as co-head football coach at the University of North Carolina and later became the first and longest serving Athletics Director for the university. Fetzer also was the head basketball coach at Davidson for two seasons, from 1916 to 1918, tallying a mark of 18–11. In addition, he coached baseball at Davidson (1915–1919), NC State (1920), and North Carolina (1921–1925), amassing a career college baseball record of 128–75–5.

Contents

Baseball career

Fetzer was also a professional baseball player. He made his Major League Baseball (MLB) debut on September 4, 1906 as a pinch hitter for the Philadelphia Athletics. In his lone at bat Fetzer failed to record a hit. This would be his only major league game, although he continued to play in the minor leagues, primarily as an outfielder, until 1910. He threw with his left hand and hit with his right. Prior to this professional career, Fetzer played collegiately at Davidson College.

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Davidson (Independent)(1915)
1915 Davidson4–3–1
Davidson Wildcats (South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1916–1918)
1916 Davidson5–3–11–28th
1917 Davidson 6–41–27th
1918 Davidson2–1–12–02nd
Davidson:17–11–34–4
NC State Aggies (South Atlantic Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1919–1920)
1919 NC State 7–23–1T–3rd
1920 NC State 7–34–26th
NC State:14–57–3
North Carolina Tar Heels (Southern Conference)(1921–1925)
1921 North Carolina 5–2–22–15th
1922 North Carolina 9–15–0T–1st
1923 North Carolina 5–3–12–1–18th
1924 North Carolina 4–52–3T–14th
1925 North Carolina 7–1–14–0–13rd
North Carolina:30–12–422–8–2
Total:61–28–7

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