Bill Hollenback

Last updated
Bill Hollenback
BillHollenback1910.JPG
Hollenback in 1910
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born(1886-02-22)February 22, 1886
Blue Bell, Pennsylvania
DiedMarch 12, 1968(1968-03-12) (aged 82)
Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania
Playing career
1904–1908 Penn
1921 Union Quakers of Philadelphia
Position(s) Fullback, end
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1909 Penn State
1910 Missouri
1911–1914 Penn State
1912 Pennsylvania Military
1915 Pennsylvania Military
1916 Syracuse
1919 Penn (assistant)
Head coaching record
Overall46–19–8
Accomplishments and honors
Awards
All-American, 1906
All-American, 1907
All-American, 1908
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1951 (profile)

William Marshall "Big Bill" Hollenback (February 22, 1886 – March 12, 1968) was an American football player and coach. He played football at the University of Pennsylvania, where he was selected as an All-American fullback three straight years, from 1906 to 1908. Hollenback served as the head football coach at Pennsylvania State University (1909, 1911–1914), the University of Missouri (1910), Pennsylvania Military College, now Widener University (1912, 1915), and Syracuse University (1916), compiling a career college football record of 46–19–8. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1951.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

University of Pennsylvania Private Ivy League research university in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

The University of Pennsylvania is a private Ivy League research university located in the University City neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Chartered in 1755, Penn is the sixth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States. It is one of the nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence. Benjamin Franklin, Penn's founder and first president, advocated an educational program that trained leaders in commerce, government, and public service, similar to a modern liberal arts curriculum. The university's coat of arms features a dolphin on its red chief, adopted from Benjamin Franklin's own coat of arms.

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original use of the term All-America seems to have been to the 1889 College Football All-America Team selected by Caspar Whitney and published in This Week's Sports in association with football pioneer Walter Camp. Camp took over the responsibility for picking the All-America team and was recognized as the official selector in the early years of the 20th century.

Contents

Early life and playing career

Born in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, Hollenback attended Phillipsburg High School. As an undergraduate at the University of Pennsylvania from 1904 to 1908, he became one of the school's most renowned football players. He played end in 1904. He was unable to play during the 1905 season due to a broken leg. After returning from the injury, Hollenback was moved to the fullback, a position he played from 1906 to 1908. He was selected as an All-American fullback in each of those years. As a senior in 1908, Holleback was the captain of the undefeated Penn team that was named national champion. Jim Thorpe, whose Carlisle Indians team played Penn to a 6–6 tie in 1908, called Hollenback his "greatest and toughest opponent." In 1921, Hollenback played professional football for the Union Quakers of Philadelphia alongside future Philadelphia Eagles founder, co-owner and coach, Bert Bell. In 1925, Hollenback served as the referee for the Pottsville Maroons' 9–7 victory over the Notre Dame All-Stars, featuring the legendary Four Horsemen, at Shibe Park. The game resulted in a controversy that stripped the Maroons of their 1925 NFL championship

Blue Bell, Pennsylvania Census-designated place in Pennsylvania, United States

Blue Bell is a census-designated place (CDP) in Whitpain Township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. As of the 2010 census, its population was 6,067.

End (gridiron football) in American and Canadian football, a player who lines up at either end of the line of scrimmage, usually beside the tackles

An end in American and Canadian football is a player who lines up at either end of the line of scrimmage, usually beside the tackles. Rules state that a legal offensive formation must always consist of seven players on the line of scrimmage and that the player on the end of the line constitutes an eligible receiver.

Jim Thorpe American track and field athlete and baseball player

James Francis Thorpe was an American athlete and Olympic gold medalist. A member of the Sac and Fox Nation, Thorpe became the first Native American to win a gold medal for the United States. Considered one of the most versatile athletes of modern sports, he won Olympic gold medals in the 1912 pentathlon and decathlon, and played American football, professional baseball, and basketball. He lost his Olympic titles after it was found he had been paid for playing two seasons of semi-professional baseball before competing in the Olympics, thus violating the amateurism rules that were then in place. In 1983, 30 years after his death, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) restored his Olympic medals.

Coaching career

Hollenback received a degree in dentistry, but opted to become a football coach after graduating from Penn. He served as the head football coach at Penn State (1909, 1911–1914), the University of Missouri (1910), Pennsylvania Military College (1915) and Syracuse University (1916). During his tenure, he compiled a 28–9–4 (.732) record.

University of Missouri American public state university

The University of Missouri is a public, land-grant research university in Columbia, Missouri. It was founded in 1839 as the first public institution of higher education west of the Mississippi River. The state's largest university, it enrolled 30,870 students in 2017 and offered over 300 degree programs in 21 academic divisions. It is the flagship campus of the University of Missouri System, which also has campuses in Kansas City, Rolla, and St. Louis. There are more than 300,000 MU alumni living worldwide with over one half residing in Missouri.

Syracuse University University located in Syracuse, New York, United States

Syracuse University is a private research university in Syracuse, New York, United States. The institution's roots can be traced to the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, founded in 1831 by the Methodist Episcopal Church in Lima, New York. After several years of debate over relocating the college to Syracuse, the university was established in 1870, independent of the college. Since 1920, the university has identified itself as nonsectarian, although it maintains a relationship with The United Methodist Church.

Business and politics

Hollenback served briefly as the president of the Bird Coal Company in 1914. He also owned the William M. Hollenback Coal Company. He was also active in politics, and served on the Philadelphia City Council from 1940 to 1944.

Philadelphia City Council

The Philadelphia City Council, the legislative body of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, consists of ten members elected by district and seven members elected at-large. The council president is elected by the members from among their number. Each member's term is four years, and there are no limits on the number of terms a member may serve.

Family and death

Hollenback married Marion Cressman in 1917. They had one child, William M. Hollenback, Jr. His older brother, Jack Hollenback, was also a head football coach at Penn State. Hollenback died in 1968 at age 82.

Jack Hollenback American football player and coach

John Coffey Hollenback was an American football player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Franklin & Marshall College from 1908 to 1909, Pennsylvania State University in 1910, and Pennsylvania Military College, now Widener University in 1911, compiling a career college football record of 21–11–3. He was the older brother of Bill Hollenback, who was also a head football coach at Penn State.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Penn State Nittany Lions (Independent)(1909)
1909 Penn State 5–0–2
Missouri Tigers (Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association)(1910)
1910 Missouri 4–2–22–1–13rd
Missouri:4–2–22–1–1
Penn State Nittany Lions (Independent)(1911–1914)
1911 Penn State 8–0–1
1912 Penn State 8–0
1913 Penn State 2–6
1914 Penn State 5–3–1
Penn State:28–9–4
Pennsylvania Military Cadets (Independent)(1912)
1912 Pennsylvania Military5–1–2
Pennsylvania Military Cadets (Independent)(1915)
1915 Pennsylvania Military4–3
Pennsylvania Military:9–4–2
Syracuse Orangemen (Independent)(1916)
1916 Syracuse 5–4
Syracuse:5–4
Total:46–19–8

See also

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