Bill McKeown

Last updated
Bill McKeown
Biographical details
Bornc. 1941
Playing career
Football
c. 1963 Northeastern
Baseball
1962–1964 Northeastern
Position(s) End (football)
Center fielder (baseball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1964 Brookline HS (MA) (assistant)
1965–1966 Boston University (OL)
1967 Western Illinois (DL)
1968 Brookline HS (MA) (assistant)
1969–1971 Curry
1972–1973 Northeastern (assistant)
1974–1975 Jersey City State
1976 Pequannock Township HS (NJ)
1980–1982 Holliston HS (MA)
1983–1989 Brookline HS (MA)
1990 Dean JC
1992 Dean JC
Wrestling
1968–1969 Brookline HS (MA)
Administrative career (AD unless noted)
2001–2003 Brookline HS (MA)
Head coaching record
Overall15–26–1 (college football)
11–7 (junior college football)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
2 NEFC (1970–1971)

Bill McKeown (born c. 1941) is a former American football coach. He served as the head football coach at Curry College in Milton, Massachusetts from 1969 to 1971 and Jersey City State College—now known as New Jersey City University (NJCU)—Jersey City, New Jersey from 1974 to 1975, compiling a career college football coaching record of 15–26–1. A native of Brookline, Massachusetts, McKeown attended Northeastern University in Boston, where played football as an end and baseball as a center fielder. [1] [2]

Contents

McKeown was hired in 1990 as the head football coach at Dean Junior College—now known as Dean College–in Franklin, Massachusetts. [3]

Head coaching record

College football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Curry Colonels (New England Football Conference)(1969–1971)
1969 Curry3–5
1970 Curry4–4–11st
1971 Curry6–21st
Curry:13–11–1
Jersey City State Gothic Knights (New Jersey State Athletic Conference)(1974–1975)
1974 Jersey City State0–95–56th
1975 Jersey City State2–61–46th
Jersey City State:2–151–9
Total:15–26–1
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

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References

  1. Concannon, Joe (January 16, 1972). "'Sticky' for Ivy; NCAA bans off-campus wooing of athletes". The Boston Globe . Boston, Massachusetts. p. 84. Retrieved June 14, 2020 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  2. "Jersey City tabs McKeown". The Record . Hackensack, New Jersey. July 31, 1974. p. D6. Retrieved June 14, 2020 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .
  3. Richards, Steve (September 9, 1990). "McKeown ready to settle at Dean". The Boston Globe . Boston, Massachusetts. p. 27. Retrieved June 14, 2020 via Newspapers.com Open Access logo PLoS transparent.svg .