Billy Halop

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Billy Halop
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Billy Halop
Born
William Halop

(1920-02-11)February 11, 1920
Jamaica, New York, United States
DiedNovember 9, 1976(1976-11-09) (aged 56)
Brentwood, California, United States
Resting place Mount Sinai Memorial Park Cemetery
OccupationActor, registered nurse
Years active19311976
Spouse(s)Helen Tupper (m.19461947; divorced)
Barbara Hoon (m.19481958; divorced)
Suzanne Roe (m.19601967; divorced)

William Halop (February 11, 1920 – November 9, 1976) was an American actor.

Contents

Life and career

Halop came from a theatrical family; his mother was a dancer, and his sister, Florence Halop, was an actress who worked on radio and in television. Additionally, he had a brother named Joel. [1]

Florence Halop was an American actress. Best known for her roles as surly patient Mrs. Hufnagel on the drama St. Elsewhere and the raspy-voiced bailiff Florence Kleiner on the sitcom Night Court, Halop was the sister of Billy Halop, one of the original Dead End/East Side Kids.

In 1933, he was given the lead as Bobby Benson in the popular new radio show The H-Bar-O Rangers , an early credit of Don Knotts as well. [2] From 1934 to 1937, he starred in one of his first radio series, playing Dick Kent, the son of Fred and Lucy Kent, in "Home Sweet Home". [3]

<i>Bobby Benson and the B-Bar-B Riders</i>

Bobby Benson and the B-Bar-B Riders is an old-time radio juvenile Western adventure program in the United States, one of the first juvenile radio programs. It was broadcast on CBS October 17, 1932 - December 11, 1936, and on Mutual June 21, 1949 - June 17, 1955.

Don Knotts American actor and stand-up comedian

Jesse Donald Knotts was an American actor and comedian, best known for his role as Deputy Sheriff Barney Fife on The Andy Griffith Show, a 1960s sitcom for which he earned five Emmy Awards, and for his role as Ralph Furley on the highly rated sitcom Three's Company from 1979 to 1984. He also starred in multiple comedic films, including playing Luther Heggs in The Ghost and Mr. Chicken (1966) and Henry Limpet in The Incredible Mr. Limpet (1964). In 1979 TV Guide ranked him #27 on its 50 Greatest TV Stars of All Time list.

After several years as a radio juvenile, he was cast as Tommy Gordon in the 1935 Broadway production of Sidney Kingsley's Dead End [4] and traveled to Hollywood with the rest of the Dead End Kids when Samuel Goldwyn produced a film version of the play in 1937. Usually called Tommy in the films, he had the recurring role of a gang leader in a series of films that featured the Dead End Kids, later billed Little Tough Guys. In his later years, he claimed that he was paid more than the other Dead End actors, which had contributed to bad feelings in the group, and that he was tired of the name "Dead End Kids". He played with James Cagney in Angels with Dirty Faces (1938), and he also played the bully Flashman, speaking with an English accent, in the 1940 film Tom Brown's School Days opposite Cedric Hardwicke and Freddie Bartholomew.

Sidney Kingsley was an American dramatist. He received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for his play Men in White in 1934.

The Dead End Kids were a group of young actors from New York City who appeared in Sidney Kingsley's Broadway play Dead End in 1935. In 1937 producer Samuel Goldwyn brought all of them to Hollywood and turned the play into a film. They proved to be so popular that they continued to make movies under various monikers, including the Little Tough Guys, the East Side Kids, and the Bowery Boys, until 1958.

Samuel Goldwyn Polish-American film producer

Samuel Goldwyn, also known as Samuel Goldfish, was a Polish-American film producer. He was most well known for being the founding contributor and executive of several motion picture studios in Hollywood. His awards include the 1973 Golden Globe Cecil B. DeMille Award, the Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award in 1947, and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award in 1958.

After serving in World War II, he found that he had grown too old to be effective in the roles that had brought him fame. At one point, he was reduced to starring in a cheap East Side Kids imitation at PRC studios, Gas House Kids (1946). Diminishing film work, marital difficulties, and a drinking problem eventually ate away at his show business career.[ citation needed ]

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

Gas House Kids is a 1946 American comedy-drama film directed by Sam Newfield and starring Robert Lowery, Billy Halop and Teala Loring. It was followed by two sequels Gas House Kids Go West and Gas House Kids in Hollywood, both released in 1947. A group of unruly New York City children from the Gas House District battle a criminal gang. Along with several other series made at the time, it was inspired by the Dead End Kids.

In the 1970s, he played the character Bert Munson, cab driver and close friend to Archie Bunker on the television series "All in the Family", appearing in episodes from 1971 to 1975.

<i>All in the Family</i> American television series

All in the Family is an American sitcom TV-series that was originally broadcast on the CBS television network for nine seasons, from January 12, 1971 to April 8, 1979. The following September, it was continued with the spin-off series Archie Bunker's Place, which picked up where All in the Family had ended and ran for four more seasons through 1983.

Marriages

Halop was married at least four times, according to interviews given near the end of his life. Helen Tupper was his first wife from 1946 until their divorce in 1947. On Valentine's Day, 1948, he married Barbara Hoon. Their marriage lasted ten years until their divorce in 1958. His third marriage in 1960 to Suzanne Roe, who had multiple sclerosis, lasted until their divorce in 1967.

The nursing skills he learned while taking care of his third wife led him to steady work as a registered nurse at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica, California. His fourth marriage, to a nurse coworker, whose name has not been publicized, was quickly annulled after she allegedly attacked him. He later moved back in with his second wife Barbara, but they chose not to remarry. [ citation needed ]

Santa Monica, California City in California

Santa Monica is a beachfront city in western Los Angeles County, California, United States. Situated on Santa Monica Bay, it is bordered on three sides by the city of Los Angeles – Pacific Palisades to the north, Brentwood on the northeast, West Los Angeles on the east, Mar Vista on the southeast, and Venice on the south. The Census Bureau population for Santa Monica in 2010 was 89,736.

Later years

Later in life, Halop supplemented his nursing income with film and television roles, including the recurring role of Bert Munson on All in the Family .

Death

Halop died on November 9, 1976 at the age of 56 from a heart attack and is interred at Mount Sinai Memorial Park Cemetery in Los Angeles, California.

Partial filmography

Films

Television

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References

  1. https://www.nytimes.com/1976/11/11/archives/billy-halop-56-dies-led-dead-end-kids-actor-in-the-kingsley-drama.html
  2. "Bobby Benson". www.otrsite.com.
  3. Cox, Jim, The A to Z of American Radio Soap Operas, p. 103
  4. The Columbia Encyclopedia of Modern Drama, Volume 1, p. 334