Billy Milton

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Billy Milton by Allan Warren Billy Milton Allan Warren.jpg
Billy Milton by Allan Warren

Billy Milton (8 December 1905 22 November 1989) was a British stage, film and television actor. Born in Paddington, Middlesex, (now in London), as William Thomas Milton, he was the son of Harry Harman Milton (1880-1942), a commission agent, and his wife Hilda Eugenie Milton, née Jackson, (1878-1935). [1]

Contents

Partial filmography

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References

  1. "Billy Milton". British Film Institute . Retrieved 10 September 2018.