Billy Miske

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Billy Miske
Billy Miske portrait.jpg
Statistics
Real nameWilliam Arthur Miske
Nickname(s)The St. Paul Thunderbolt
Weight(s) Light Heavyweight
Heavyweight
Height6 ft 0 12 in (1.84 m)
Reach76 in (193 cm)
Nationality American
Born(1894-04-12)April 12, 1894
St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S.
DiedJanuary 1, 1924(1924-01-01) (aged 29)
Boxing record
Total fights105
Wins74
Wins by KO34
Losses13
Draws16

Billy Miske, alias The Saint Paul Thunderbolt (April 12, 1894 – January 1, 1924), was a professional boxer from Saint Paul, Minnesota. [1] During his tenure as a pugilist he had multiple-bout series with a plethora of all-time greats including Harry Greb, Jack Dempsey, Jack Dillon, Tommy Gibbons, Bill Brennan and Battling Levinsky, among others. Despite a career shortened by illness and an early death, statistical website BoxRec still lists Miske as the No. 26 ranked heavyweight of all-time. [2]

Contents

Professional boxing career

Miske falling to the mat during his 1920 bout with Jack Dempsey Jack Dempsey vs. Billy Miske 1920.jpg
Miske falling to the mat during his 1920 bout with Jack Dempsey

An American of German descent, Miske stood at 6'0" and over the course of his career weighed between 158 and 190 lbs. He was managed by John Pearl "J.P" Smith (1913–18) and Jack Reddy (1918–23).

Miske was born in St. Paul, Minnesota. He began his career as a middleweight. During the course of his career, he competed successfully as a light-heavyweight and heavyweight, defeating many well known fighters. On September 6, 1920, Miske lost to Jack Dempsey in the third round of a fight to decide the World Heavyweight Boxing title. It was the first heavyweight title match to be broadcast on radio, and it was the only time Billy Miske was ever knocked out.

Illness and death

Miske fought his last bout against Bill Brennan, whom he met on November 7, 1923. At this point in his life, Miske knew he did not have much time left before his kidneys gave out (doctors had told him he had only months to live because of his Bright's Disease). Due to his family's economic situation, however, Miske decided he had to step into the ring one more time. [3] [4] His health prevented him from training for the fight. Amazingly, though, Miske knocked Brennan out in the fourth round. [5] Miske died in St. Paul, Minnesota of kidney failure less than 2 months later on January 1, 1924. [6] [7]

Legacy

Miske's enduring legacy is that of an underappreciated fighter. It is argued that Miske deserved, but never received, title matches against Jack Dillon, Battling Levinsky and Georges Carpentier. His three recorded losses are against Hall of Famers Jack Dempsey, Kid Norfolk and Tommy Gibbons, while his list of defeated opponents boasts some of the most storied names in boxing history. Miske's final professional record was 72-15-14 with 33 wins by knockout. [8] On December 8, 2009, it was announced that Miske would be inducted into the International Boxing Hall of Fame in 2010. On September 28, 2012 Miske was inducted into the Minnesota Boxing Hall of Fame.

Notable bouts

ResultOpponentTypeRd., TimeDateLocationNotes [9]
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Tommy Gibbons UD101922-12-15 Flag of the United States.svg Saint Paul Auditorium, Saint Paul, Minnesota
Win Flag of the United States.svg Tommy Gibbons DQ10 (15)1922-10-13 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York, New York
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Jack Dempsey KO3 (10)1920-09-06 Flag of the United States.svg Floyd Fitzsimmons Arena, Benton Harbor, Michigan For World Heavyweight Title.
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Battling Levinsky NWS121919-07-03 Flag of the United States.svg Rossford Arena, Rossford, Ohio Newspaper Decision
Draw Flag of the United States.svg Tommy Gibbons NWS101919-06-19 Flag of the United States.svg Nicollet Park, Minneapolis, Minnesota Newspaper Decision
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Kid Norfolk NWS101919-06-09 Flag of the United States.svg Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Newspaper Decision
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Harry Greb NWS101919-03-31 Flag of the United States.svg Duquesne Gardens, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Newspaper Decision
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Jack Dempsey NWS61918-11-28 Flag of the United States.svg Olympia A.C., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Newspaper Decision
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Harry Greb NWS101918-09-21 Flag of the United States.svg Forbes Field, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Newspaper Decision
Win Flag of the United States.svg Gunboat Smith NWS81918-07-12 Flag of the United States.svg International League Ballpark, Jersey City, New Jersey Newspaper Decision
Draw Flag of the United States.svg Jack Dempsey NWS101918-05-03 Flag of the United States.svg Saint Paul Auditorium, Saint Paul, Minnesota Newspaper Decision
Win Flag of the United States.svg Gunboat Smith PTS101918-04-12 Flag of the United States.svg Atlanta Auditorium, Atlanta, Georgia
Win Flag of the United States.svg Jack Dillon NWS101917-11-13 Flag of the United States.svg Broadway Auditorium, Brooklyn, New York Newspaper Decision
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Kid Norfolk PTS121917-10-16 Flag of the United States.svg Arena (Armory A.A.), Boston, Massachusetts
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Battling Levinsky NWS101917-02-27 Flag of the United States.svg Saint Paul Auditorium, Saint Paul, Minnesota Newspaper Decision
Win Flag of the United States.svg Jack Dillon NWS101917-01-16 Flag of the United States.svg Broadway Auditorium, Brooklyn, New York Newspaper Decision
Win Flag of the United States.svg Jack Dillon NWS101916-12-19 Flag of the United States.svg Broadway Auditorium, Brooklyn, New York Newspaper Decision
Win Flag of the United States.svg Battling Levinsky NWS101916-10-30 Flag of the United States.svg Clermont Avenue Rink, Brooklyn, New York Newspaper Decision
Win Flag of the United States.svg Battling Levinsky NWS101916-10-12 Flag of the United States.svg Clermont Avenue Rink, Brooklyn, New York Newspaper Decision
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Jack Dillon NWS101916-04-14 Flag of the United States.svg Saint Paul Auditorium, Saint Paul, Minnesota Newspaper Decision
Win Flag of the United States.svg Jack Dillon NWS101916-01-28 Flag of the United States.svg Opera House, Superior, Wisconsin Newspaper Decision
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Tommy Gibbons NWS101915-07-12 Flag of the United States.svg Saint Paul Auditorium, Saint Paul, Minnesota Newspaper Decision
Win Flag of the United States.svg Mike O'Dowd NWS101915-04-06 Flag of the United States.svg Hudson Arena, Superior, Wisconsin Newspaper Decision
Draw Flag of the United States.svg Harry Greb NWS61915-01-12 Flag of the United States.svg Fairmont A.C., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Newspaper Decision
Loss Flag of the United States.svg Tommy Gibbons NWS101914-03-24 Flag of the United States.svg Hudson Arena, Superior, Wisconsin Newspaper Decision
NC Flag of the United States.svg Mike O'Dowd ND101913-07-06 Flag of the United States.svg Saint Paul, Minnesota

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References

  1. "Billy Miske - Boxrec Boxing Encyclopaedia". Boxrec.com. Retrieved 2014-05-04.
  2. All-Time Heavyweight Rankings. BoxRec.com. Retrieved on 2014-04-11.
  3. Ziglar, Zig (2010-10-19). Ziglar, Zig, (2000). See You At The Top, pp. 331-332, Pelican Publishing Company, ISBN 1-56554-706-3. ISBN   9781455611805 . Retrieved 2014-05-04.
  4. "What If Your Number Came Up? Les Goates, May 4, 1952, The Deseret News". 1952-05-04. Retrieved 2014-05-04.
  5. "Newspaper Article: Fighter gave his all for family's holiday, Spokane Chronicle, December 25, 1985". 1985-12-25. Retrieved 2014-05-04.
  6. "BoxRec Boxing Encyclopedia". Boxrec.com. Retrieved 2014-05-04.
  7. "The Evening Independent, 1924". 1924-01-04. Retrieved 2014-05-04.
  8. "Billy Miske". Boxrec.com. Retrieved 2014-05-04.
  9. Billy Miske's Professional Boxing Record. BoxRec.com. Retrieved on 2014-05-18.