Biscoe Islands

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Biscoe Islands
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Location of Biscoe Islands in the Antarctic Peninsula region
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Biscoe Islands
Location in Antarctica
Geography
Location Antarctica
Coordinates 65°26′S65°30′W / 65.433°S 65.500°W / -65.433; -65.500 Coordinates: 65°26′S65°30′W / 65.433°S 65.500°W / -65.433; -65.500
ArchipelagoBiscoe Islands
Total islandsOver 60
Major islands6
Area478.38 km2 (184.70 sq mi)
Length43.527 km (27.0464 mi)
Administration
Administered under the Antarctic Treaty System

Biscoe Islands is a series of islands, of which the principal ones are Renaud, Lavoisier (named Serrano by Chile and Mitre by Argentina), Watkins, Krogh, Pickwick and Rabot, lying parallel to the west coast of Graham Land and extending 150  km (81 nmi) between Southwind Passage on the northeast and Matha Strait on the southwest. [1] Another group of islands are the Adolph Islands. [2]

The islands are named for John Biscoe, the commander of a British expedition which explored the islands in February 1832. [3] [4]

See also

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Renaud Island

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Lavoisier Island

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Alepu Rocks

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Henkes Islands

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Toledo Island

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References

  1. "Biscoe Islands". Composite Gazeteer of Antarctica. Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Retrieved 2019-04-23.
  2. "Adolph Islands". Composite Gazeteer of Antarctica. Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Retrieved 2019-04-23.
  3. Stanton, William (1975). The Great United States Exploring Expedition . Berkeley: University of California Press. pp.  147. ISBN   0520025571.
  4. "Who was John Biscoe?". www.antarctica.gov.au. Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Retrieved 2019-04-23.