Bishop Ranch Regional Preserve

Last updated
Bishop Ranch Regional Preserve
LocationContra Costa County, California
Nearest citySan Ramon, California
Area806 acres (3.26 km2)
Operated byEast Bay Regional Park District

Bishop Ranch Regional Preserve (BRRP), also known as Bishop Ranch Regional Open Space Preserve is a 444-acre (1.80 km2) regional park on a ridge top at the edge of San Ramon, CA. It is near residential area, west of San Ramon Valley Road and South of Bollinger Canyon Road. Trails are steep and there are no facilities other than a trailhead. It is part of the East Bay Regional Parks system. [1]

A regional park is an area of land preserved on account of its natural beauty, historic interest, recreational use or other reason, and under the administration of a form of local government.

Trailhead The point at which a trail begins

A trailhead is the point at which a trail begins, where the trail is often intended for hiking, biking, horseback riding, or off-road vehicles. Modern trailheads often contain rest rooms, maps, sign posts and distribution centers for informational brochures about the trail and its features, and parking areas for vehicles and trailers.

East Bay Regional Park District

The East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD) is a special district operating in Alameda County and Contra Costa County, California, within the East Bay area of the San Francisco Bay Area. It maintains and operates a system of regional parks which is the largest urban regional park district in the United States. The administrative office is located in Oakland.

Contents

Bishop Ranch preserve is primarily a place for observing nature. There are three trails for hiking biking and horseback riding, but no facilities for picnicking or camping. The steep terrain makes the trails generally unsuitable for wheelchairs. [1]

In August, 2015, EBRPD announced that it had acquired a 362 acres (1.46 km2) tract along the Calaveras Ridge that will be added to BRRP, connecting Bishop Ranch with Dublin Hills Regional Park. [lower-alpha 1] . EBRPD board member, Beverly Lane, was cited as saying that this acquisition is part of an EBRPD plan to create a continuous trail that will reach from Sunol to Lafayette through six regional parks." The new acquisition cost $2 million, and was previously owned by the Wiedemann family, which had raised cattle here since the 1860s. The new addition includes the local landmark, Harlan Hill, which rises to an elevation of 1,719 feet (524 m). EBRPD must complete a land-use plan for the Bishop Ranch open space, before it can open this new acquisition for public use. [2]

Dublin Hills Regional Park covers 654 acres (2,650,000 m2) in Alameda County, California, west of the city of Dublin. It is part of the East Bay Regional Park District (EBRPD). The park is accessible from the Donlon Hill Staging Area, which is on Dublin Boulevard near Dublin, California.

Notes

  1. Acquisition of the Wiedemann parcel will bring the total area of BRRP to 806 acres (3.26 km2)


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References

Coordinates: 37°45′20″N121°58′15″W / 37.75563°N 121.97073°W / 37.75563; -121.97073

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.