Bishop Ryder Church, Birmingham

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Coordinates: 52°29′06″N1°53′21″W / 52.484954°N 1.889233°W / 52.484954; -1.889233

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Contents

Bishop Ryder Memorial Church, Birmingham
Location Birmingham
Country England
Denomination Church of England
Architecture
Architect(s) Thomas Rickman and Richard Charles Hussey
Completed1838
Construction cost£4,500 (£397,981 in 2018) [1]
Demolished1960

Bishop Ryder Memorial Church, Birmingham, was a parish church in the Church of England in Birmingham from 1838 to 1960.

Church of England Anglican state church of England

The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

Birmingham Major city in the English Midlands, 2nd highest population of UK cities

Birmingham is a major city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands, England. It is the second-most populous city in the United Kingdom, after London, and the most populous city in the English Midlands. It is also the most populous metropolitan district in the United Kingdom, with an estimated 1,137,123 inhabitants, and is considered the social, cultural, financial, and commercial centre of the Midlands. It is the main local government of the West Midlands conurbation, which is the third most populated urban area in the United Kingdom, with a population of 2,897,303 in 2017. The wider Birmingham metropolitan area is the second largest in the United Kingdom with a population of over 4.3 million. It is frequently referred to as both England and the United Kingdom's "second city".

History

Built on Gem Street in Gosta Green in Birmingham, it was a red brick and stone church designed by Thomas Rickman and Richard Charles Hussey in the Gothic style. It was built to commemorate Henry Ryder, Bishop of Lichfield [2] and was consecrated in 1838. A parish was created out of St Martin in the Bull Ring in 1841.

Gosta Green District in Birmingham, England

Gosta Green is an area in the city of Birmingham, England. It lies at the edge of the city centre, about three-quarters of a mile to the north-east of Birmingham New Street station via Corporation St or the High St.

Thomas Rickman, was an English architect and architectural antiquary who was a major figure in the Gothic Revival. He is particularly remembered for his Attempt to Discriminate the Styles of English Architecture (1817), which established the basic chronological classification and terminology that are still in widespread use for the different styles of English medieval ecclesiastical architecture.

Richard Charles Hussey, often referred to as R. C. Hussey, was a British architect. He was in partnership with Thomas Rickman from 1835, whose practice he assumed in 1838 with the latter's failing health; Rickman died on 4 January 1841.

The chancel was rebuilt in 1894 by J. A. Chatwin funded by J.C. Holder in memory of his father, Henry Holder. [3] In 1925 the parish of St Mary's Church, Whittall Street, Birmingham was united with Bishop Ryder, and in 1939 part of the parish and the benefice of St Bartholomew’s Church, Birmingham, were united.

J. A. Chatwin British architect

Julius Alfred Chatwin FRIBA, ARBS, FSAScot was a British architect. He was involved with the building and modification of many churches in Birmingham, and practised both Neo-Gothic and Neo-Classical styles. His designs always included all of the carvings and internal fittings.

St Marys Church, Whittall Street, Birmingham Church in Birmingham, England

St Mary’s, was a Church of England parish church in Whittall Street, Birmingham, England.

St Bartholomew’s Church, Birmingham Church in Birmingham, England

St Bartholomew’s Church, Masshouse Lane, Digbeth, Birmingham is a former Church of England parish church in Birmingham.

The church was demolished in 1960. Gem Street also no longer exists, but the church was located in the middle of the modern Aston University campus.

Aston University University in Birmingham, England

Aston University is a public research university situated in the city centre of Birmingham, England. Aston began as the Birmingham Municipal Technical School in 1895, evolving into the UK's first College of Advanced Technology in 1956. Aston University received its royal charter from Queen Elizabeth II on 22 April 1966.

Vicars

The Right Reverend Mesac Thomas was an Anglican bishop in Australia.

Bells

For the consecration in 1838, a single bell by William Taylor of Oxford was installed. In 1869 Blews and Son provided a ring of eight bells at a cost of £600. [6] These were later recast by Taylors of Loughborough. When the church was closed the bells were transferred to St Peter's Church, Harborne.

Organ

The first organ in the church was built by Theodore Charles Bates of London and opened on 7 December 1841. [7]

A later organ was built by J C Banfield which was renovated in 1939 by Walter James Bird. A specification of the organ can be found on the National Pipe Organ Register. [8]

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References

  1. UK Retail Price Index inflation figures are based on data from Clark, Gregory (2017). "The Annual RPI and Average Earnings for Britain, 1209 to Present (New Series)". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  2. Osbornes' Guide to the Grand Junction, Or Birmingham, Liverpool, and Manchester Railway: Edward Cornelius Osborne. 1840
  3. Birmingham Daily Post - Monday 3 July 1893
  4. Newcastle Journal, Saturday 7 March 1863
  5. Cornishman, Thursday 20 August 1931
  6. Birmingham Journal - Saturday 23 January 1869
  7. Birmingham Gazette - Monday 6 December 1841
  8. "The National Pipe Organ Register - NPOR". npor.org.uk. Retrieved 30 July 2016.