Blue Balliett

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Blue Balliett in 2015. Blue Balliett.JPG
Blue Balliett in 2015.

Blue Balliett (born 1955 in New York) is an American author, best known for her award-winning novel for children, Chasing Vermeer . She was born Elizabeth Balliett, but her family started calling her Blue shortly after her birth.[ citation needed ]

<i>Chasing Vermeer</i> book

Chasing Vermeer is a 2004 children's art mystery novel written by Blue Balliett and illustrated by Brett Helquist. Set in Hyde Park, Chicago near the University of Chicago, the novel follows two children, Calder Pillay and Petra Andalee. After a famous Johannes Vermeer painting, A Lady In Writing, is stolen en route to the Art Institute of Chicago, Calder and Petra work together to try to recover it. The thief publishes many advertisements in the newspaper, explaining that he will give the painting back if the community can discover which paintings under Vermeer's name were really painted by him. This causes Petra, Calder, and the rest of Hyde Park to examine art more closely. Themes of art, chance, coincidence, deception, and problem-solving are apparent.

Chasing Vermeer, released by Scholastic Press in 2004, is her best-known and most highly praised book. Illustrated by Brett Helquist, it concerns the fictitious theft of a painting by 17th-century Dutch artist Jan Vermeer. The book was a bestseller and won a number of accolades and awards, including the 2005 Edgar Award in the Best Juvenile category. [1] In addition, she was awarded the Agatha Award in 2004 in the category Best Children's or Young Adult. [2]

Brett L. Helquist is an American illustrator best known for his work in the children's books A Series of Unfortunate Events. As such, his illustrations for that series have appeared in multiple media, including the books, the audio book covers, and the calendars.

Dutch people or the Dutch are a Germanic ethnic group native to the Netherlands. They share a common culture and speak the Dutch language. Dutch people and their descendants are found in migrant communities worldwide, notably in Aruba, Suriname, Guyana, Curaçao, Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, and the United States. The Low Countries were situated around the border of France and the Holy Roman Empire, forming a part of their respective peripheries, and the various territories of which they consisted had become virtually autonomous by the 13th century. Under the Habsburgs, the Netherlands were organised into a single administrative unit, and in the 16th and 17th centuries the Northern Netherlands gained independence from Spain as the Dutch Republic. The high degree of urbanization characteristic of Dutch society was attained at a relatively early date. During the Republic the first series of large-scale Dutch migrations outside of Europe took place.

The Edgar Allan Poe Awards, named after Edgar Allan Poe, are presented every year by the Mystery Writers of America, based in New York City. They honor the best in mystery fiction, non-fiction, television, film, and theater published or produced in the previous year.

A sequel, The Wright 3 , was released in April, 2006, and a third, The Calder Game , was published two years later, in April 2008. The Danger Box was published in August 2010. Her next book, "Hold Fast" was published in 2013. Soon after, in 2015, Balliett published Pieces and Players. Balliett has also published two oral histories involving Nantucket ghost stories in the 1980s, which have been consolidated into one book, "Nantucket Ghosts" released by Down East Books in 2006 .

<i>The Wright 3</i> book by Blue Balliett

The Wright 3 is a 2006 children's mystery novel written by Blue Balliett and illustrated by Brett Helquist. It was released in Spring 2006 and is the sequel to the children's novel Chasing Vermeer. It chronicles how Calder, Petra, and Tommy strive to save the Robie House in their neighborhood, Hyde Park, Chicago. The underlying plot elements include 3-D pentominoes, Frank Lloyd Wright, the Robie House Fibonacci numbers, The Invisible Man, and mysterious occurrences.

<i>The Calder Game</i> book by Blue Balliett

The Calder Game is a children's novel written by Blue Balliett and illustrated by Brett Helquist, published in 2008. It is the sequel to The Wright 3. Some underlying themes include the art of Alexander Calder, pentominoes, and the freedom of public art.

Before releasing Chasing Vermeer, she taught third grade at the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools. During her tenure, she coordinated with NASA astronaut and University of Chicago alumnus John M. Grunsfeld (S.M., '84, Ph.D., '88) to send her pupil's literature and creative artwork into space during a routine Hubble space telescope mission on the Columbia space shuttle. [3]

John M. Grunsfeld American astronaut and astronomer

John Mace Grunsfeld is an American physicist and a former NASA astronaut. He is a veteran of five Space Shuttle flights and has served as NASA Chief Scientist. His academic background includes research in high energy astrophysics, cosmic ray physics and the emerging field of exoplanet studies with specific interest in future astronomical instrumentation. After retiring from NASA in 2009, he served as the Deputy Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland. In January 2012, he returned to NASA and served as associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD). Grunsfeld announced his retirement from NASA in April 2016.

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References

  1. "Author Chat: Blue Balliett". Scholastic Teachers. 8 November 2005. Archived from the original on September 23, 2009. Retrieved 5 December 2010.
  2. "Agatha Award Winners". www.thebookescape.com. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  3. "Alumnus will travel with Lab Schools’ project to Hubble Space Telescope", University of Chicago Chronicle Vol. 21 No. 10, Feb. 21, 2002.