Bo-taoshi

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Two squads scrambling for possession of the pole. NDAJ Bo-taoshi 4.JPG
Two squads scrambling for possession of the pole.

Bo-taoshi (Japanese: 棒倒し, Hepburn: bōtaoshi, "pole toppling"), is a capture-the-flag-like game, played on sports days at schools in Japan. The game, traditionally played by cadets at the National Defense Academy (NDA) of Japan on its anniversary, is famous for its size, wherein two teams totalling 150 individuals each vie for control of a single large pole. [1] Each team is split into two groups of 75 attackers and 75 defenders. The defenders begin in a defensive orientation respective to their pole, while the attackers assume position some measure away from the other team's pole. A team concedes if its pole is brought lower than 30° to the horizontal (beginning perpendicular, or 90°, to the horizontal). Until a rule change in 1973, the pole had only to be brought lower than 45° to the horizontal.

Contents

Rules and player positions

The National Defense Academy of Japan explains the rules and positions as follows: [2] [3]

Rules

Defense positions


Offense positions

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References

  1. Furbush, James (2011-07-14). "Bo-Taoshi: Super Happy Pole Pulldown Sport Time". Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved 2011-07-18.
  2. "防衛大の棒倒しとは ("What is Bō-taoshi at the Academy?")". National Defense Academy of Japan. Retrieved 2020-07-19.
  3. "ルール説明 ("Rule description")". National Defense Academy of Japan. Retrieved 2020-07-19.

Further reading