Bob Fillion

Last updated
Bob Fillion
Bob Fillion MTL.jpg
Born(1920-07-12)July 12, 1920
Thetford Mines, Quebec, Canada
Died August 13, 2015(2015-08-13) (aged 95)
Longueuil, Quebec, Canada
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 170 lb (77 kg; 12 st 2 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Left
Played for Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 19431951

Joseph Louis Robert Edgar "Bob" Fillion (July 12, 1920 – August 13, 2015) was a Canadian professional ice hockey player who played seven seasons for the Montreal Canadiens of the National Hockey League (NHL). He was a member of two Stanley Cup-winning teams during his career with Montreal; in 1944 and 1946. He also spent time with the Buffalo Bisons of the AHL and the Sherbrooke Saints of the Quebec Senior Hockey League (QSHL). He died on August 13, 2015. [1] [2] At the time of his death, Fillion was the last surviving member of the Canadiens' 1944 Stanley Cup team.

Ice hockey team sport played on ice using sticks, skates, and a puck

Ice hockey is a contact team sport played on ice, usually in a rink, in which two teams of skaters use their sticks to shoot a vulcanized rubber puck into their opponent's net to score points. The sport is known to be fast-paced and physical, with teams usually consisting of six players each: one goaltender, and five players who skate up and down the ice trying to take the puck and score a goal against the opposing team.

Montreal Canadiens National Hockey League team in Montreal, Quebec, Canada

The Montreal Canadiens are a professional ice hockey team based in Montreal, Quebec. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL).

National Hockey League North American professional ice hockey league

The National Hockey League is a professional ice hockey league in North America, currently comprising 31 teams: 24 in the United States and 7 in Canada. The NHL is considered to be the premier professional ice hockey league in the world, and one of the major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. The Stanley Cup, the oldest professional sports trophy in North America, is awarded annually to the league playoff champion at the end of each season.

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Fillion hockey playing family

Born in Thetford Mines, Quebec, Fillion is a member of Thetford Mines' and one of Quebec's most famous hockey family, being one of seven hockey playing siblings. Right winger Marcel also reached the National Hockey League, playing one game for the Boston Bruins in 1944–1945 and playing in the Eastern Hockey League, the American Hockey League and the Quebec Senior Hockey League from 1944 to 1952. Right winger Dennis played in the United States Hockey League, the Pacific Coast Hockey League, the American Hockey League, the Maritime Major Hockey League, the Quebec Senior Hockey League and the Atlantic Coast Senior League from 1948 to 1956. Defenceman Georges was invited to the Montreal Canadiens training camp at the same time as Bob but decided to return home to Thetford Mines because he did not speak English very well. He played in the Quebec Senior Hockey League. Nelson, Fernand and Jean-Marie Fillion also played in the Quebec Senior Hockey League and various Senior Hockey leagues throughout the years. All seven Fillion brothers played on the same team, the Thetford Chappies of the Ligue Intermédiaire de Hockey du Québec during the 1940s. This was where Bob and Georges were spotted by a Canadiens scout.

Thetford Mines City in Quebec, Canada

Thetford Mines is a city in south-central Quebec, Canada. It is the seat of Les Appalaches Regional County Municipality.

Quebec Province of Canada

Quebec is one of the thirteen provinces and territories of Canada. It is bordered to the west by the province of Ontario and the bodies of water James Bay and Hudson Bay; to the north by Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay; to the east by the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador; and to the south by the province of New Brunswick and the U.S. states of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York. It also shares maritime borders with Nunavut, Prince Edward Island, and Nova Scotia. Quebec is Canada's largest province by area and its second-largest administrative division; only the territory of Nunavut is larger. It is historically and politically considered to be part of Central Canada.

Joseph George Leopold Marcel Fillion was a Canadian professional ice hockey left winger who played in one National Hockey League game for the Boston Bruins during the 1944–45 NHL season. Marcel is the brother of Bob Fillion.

Post Hockey

Fillion returned to Thetford Mines to work as a manager at the mines, later moving to Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and died in Longueuil, Quebec. [3]

Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu City in Quebec, Canada

Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu is a city in eastern Montérégie in the Canadian province of Quebec, about 40 kilometres (25 mi) southeast of Montreal. It is situated on the west bank of the Richelieu River at the northernmost navigable point of Lake Champlain. The results of the 2011 Census stated that the city's population was 92,394; the number of residents was estimated at 94,636 in 2014.

Longueuil City in Quebec, Canada

Longueuil is a city in the province of Quebec, Canada. It is the seat of the Montérégie administrative region and the central city of the urban agglomeration of Longueuil. It sits on the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River directly across from Montreal. The population as of the Canada 2016 Census totalled 239,700, making it Montreal's second largest suburb, the fifth most populous city in Quebec and twentieth largest in Canada.

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