Bob Grim (baseball)

Last updated
Bob Grim
Bob Grim 1957.jpg
Pitcher
Born:(1930-03-08)March 8, 1930
New York, New York
Died: October 23, 1996(1996-10-23) (aged 66)
Shawnee, Kansas
Batted: RightThrew: Right
MLB debut
April 18, 1954, for the New York Yankees
Last MLB appearance
May 24, 1962, for the Kansas City Athletics
MLB statistics
Win–loss record 61–41
Earned run average 3.61
Strikeouts 443
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Robert Anton Grim (March 8, 1930 – October 23, 1996) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. [1]

Pitcher the player responsible for throwing ("pitching") the ball to the batters in a game of baseball or softball

In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the pitcher is assigned the number 1. The pitcher is often considered the most important player on the defensive side of the game, and as such is situated at the right end of the defensive spectrum. There are many different types of pitchers, such as the starting pitcher, relief pitcher, middle reliever, lefty specialist, setup man, and the closer.

Major League Baseball Professional baseball league

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball organization, the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League (AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball in 2000. The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises 256 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs. With the World Baseball Softball Confederation, MLB manages the international World Baseball Classic tournament.

Contents

Life

Born in New York City, he was signed as an amateur free agent by the New York Yankees in 1948. His Major League debut was on April 18, 1954 for the Yankees. He wore uniform number 55 for the Yankees during his entire period on the team. He won 20 games (the first Yankee rookie to win 20 since 1910) and lost only 6 that year, with a 3.26 earned run average, and was voted American League Rookie of the Year, with 15 votes out of 24. He played in two World Series for the Yankees, in 1955 (against the Brooklyn Dodgers) and in 1957 (against the Milwaukee Braves). By 1957, because of arm troubles, he became an exclusive relief pitcher. He has been retroactively listed as leading the American League in saves in 1957 with 19. (At the time, saves were not a regularly calculated statistic.)

New York Yankees Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in the Bronx, New York, United States

The New York Yankees are an American professional baseball team based in the New York City borough of the Bronx. The Yankees compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) East division. They are one of two major league clubs based in New York City, the other being the New York Mets of the National League. In the 1901 season, the club began play in the AL as the Baltimore Orioles. Frank Farrell and Bill Devery purchased the franchise and moved it to New York City, renaming the club the New York Highlanders. The Highlanders were officially renamed the Yankees in 1913.

Earned run average

In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. It is determined by dividing the number of earned runs allowed by the number of innings pitched and multiplying by nine. Runs resulting from defensive errors are recorded as unearned runs and omitted from ERA calculations.

American League Baseball league, part of Major League Baseball

The American League of Professional Baseball Clubs, or simply the American League (AL), is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States and Canada. It developed from the Western League, a minor league based in the Great Lakes states, which eventually aspired to major league status. It is sometimes called the Junior Circuit because it claimed Major League status for the 1901 season, 25 years after the formation of the National League.

Grim got the final out of the 1957 All-Star Game, being brought in from the bullpen with the American League leading 6–5 and getting pinch-hitter Gil Hodges on a game-ending fly out to left field. He also took the loss in Game 4 of the 1957 World Series when he allowed a walk-off home run to Milwaukee Braves third baseman Eddie Mathews.

1957 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1957 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 24th playing of the midseason exhibition baseball game between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 9, 1957, at Busch Stadium in St. Louis, Missouri, the home of the St. Louis Cardinals of the National League. The game was marked by controversy surrounding Cincinnati Redlegs fans stuffing the ballot box and electing all but one of their starting position players to the game. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 6–5.

Gil Hodges United States Marine; American baseball player

Gilbert Ray Hodges, neHodge was an American Major League Baseball (MLB) first baseman and manager who played most of his 18-year career for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers. He was inducted into the New York Mets Hall of Fame in 1982.

The 1957 World Series featured the defending champions, the New York Yankees, playing against the Milwaukee Braves. After finishing just one game behind the N.L. Champion Brooklyn Dodgers in 1956, the Braves came back in 1957 to win their first pennant since moving from Boston in 1953. The Braves won the Series in seven games, behind Lew Burdette's three complete game victories. The Braves would be the only team besides the Yankees, Dodgers, or Giants to win a World Series title in the 1950s.

On June 15, 1958, Grim was traded, along with Harry Simpson, by the New York Yankees to the Kansas City Athletics for Duke Maas and Virgil Trucks. He had records of 7–6 and 6–10 for the Athletics the next two seasons.

Harry Simpson American baseball player

Harry Leon "Suitcase" Simpson was an African American outfielder and first baseman in Major League Baseball who played for the Cleveland Indians, Kansas City Athletics, New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox, and Pittsburgh Pirates in his eight-year career. He played in the World Series with the New York Yankees in 1957, which they lost.

Duke Maas American baseball player

Duane Fredrick Maas was a professional baseball pitcher over parts of 7 seasons (1955–1961) with the Detroit Tigers, Kansas City Athletics and New York Yankees.

Virgil Trucks baseball player from the United States

Virgil Oliver "Fireball" Trucks was an American Major League Baseball pitcher with the Detroit Tigers, St. Louis Browns, Chicago White Sox, Kansas City Athletics and New York Yankees between 1941 and 1958. He batted and threw right-handed.

He played with three teams in 1960. On April 5, 1960, he was traded by Kansas City to the Cleveland Indians for Leo Kiely. On May 18, the Cincinnati Reds purchased his contract from Cleveland, and on July 29, the St. Louis Cardinals purchased his contract from Cincinnati. He spent all of 1961 at the Triple-A level in the Redbird organization.

Cleveland Indians Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Cleveland, Ohio, United States

The Cleveland Indians are an American professional baseball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. The Indians compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the American League (AL) Central division. Since 1994, they have played at Progressive Field. The team's spring training facility is at Goodyear Ballpark in Goodyear, Arizona. Since their establishment as a major league franchise in 1901, the Indians have won two World Series championships: in 1920 and 1948, along with 10 Central Division titles and six American League pennants. The Indians' current World Series championship drought is the longest active drought.

Leo Kiely American baseball player

Leo Patrick Kiely was an American pitcher in Major League Baseball who played between 1951 and 1960 for the Boston Red Sox and Kansas City Athletics (1960). Listed at 6 feet 2 inches (1.88 m), 180 pounds (82 kg), Kiely batted and threw left-handed. He was born in Hoboken, New Jersey.

Cincinnati Reds Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Cincinnati, Ohio, United States

The Cincinnati Reds are an American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Reds compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. They were a charter member of the American Association in 1882 and joined the NL in 1890.

Grim was released by the Cardinals before the 1962 season, but on April 9, 1962 he was signed as a free agent with the Kansas City Athletics. His final MLB game was played on May 24, and the A's released him on May 31.

He died in Shawnee, Kansas at age 66 after suffering a heart attack while throwing snowballs with neighborhood kids. [2]

See also

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References

  1. "Bob Grim Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference. Retrieved July 1, 2015.
  2. Bob Grim, Pitcher, 66