Bob Nash (American football)

Last updated
Bob Nash
Position: End / Tackle
Personal information
Born:(1892-12-16)December 16, 1892
County Meath, Ireland
Died:February 1, 1977(1977-02-01) (aged 84)
Winchester, Connecticut
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:205 lb (93 kg)
Career information
High school: Bernardsville (NJ) Bernards
College: Rutgers
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
  • All-American (1914)
  • Head coaching record: 11–6–1
  • Part of the first NFL player trade (1920)
  • NFL champion (1920)
  • Third-Team All-Pro (1920)
  • 1st Captain - New York Giants (1925)
  • Rutgers Hall of Fame (1988)
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Robert Arthur “Nasty” Nash (December 16, 1892 February 1, 1977) was an Irish-American professional American football player who played in the American Professional Football Association (renamed the National Football League in 1922) for the Akron Pros, Buffalo All-Americans, Rochester Jeffersons and the New York Giants. Prior to joining the AFPA, Nash played professionally in the "Ohio League" for the Massillon Tigers. He was considered by sports historians as one of the greatest tackles of his era.

Contents

Nash was born in Ireland and raised in Bernardsville, New Jersey, [1] where he played high school football at Bernards High School. [2] Prior to playing professional football, Nash played college football at Cornell University and at Rutgers, where he received All-American honors in 1914. [1] He was inducted into the Rutgers Hall of Fame in 1988.

Professional career

On Sunday, October 10, 1920, Nash is credited with the first fumble recovery for a touchdown in a game featuring two league teams. [3]

On Sunday, October 24, 1920, Nash picked up a blocked punt in the first quarter and ran eight yards for the only score of the day as the Pros defeated the Cleveland Tigers, 7–0.

On Sunday, October 31, 1920, according to Ike Roy Martin; on a punt return Jim Thorpe had instructed Martin to let Nash get by him. Thorpe had wanted to run into Nash, which he did. The collision resulted in them both being knocked out and they were carried off the field. [4]

Nash was also a part of the first APFA player deal, in 1920, when Akron sold Nash to Buffalo for $300 and five percent of the gate receipts during a game between the two clubs. However, since Nash was a part of the Akron Pros during their championship season, he is credited as belonging on their championship team. Nash was also the very first captain of the New York Giants.

Related Research Articles

The Akron Pros were a professional football team that played in Akron, Ohio, from 1908 to 1926. The team originated in 1908 as a semi-pro team named the Akron Indians, but later became Akron Pros in 1920 as the team set out to become a charter member of the American Professional Football Association. Fritz Pollard, the first black head coach in the NFL, co-coached the Akron Pros in 1921. Paul Robeson played for the team in 1921 as well. He was among the earliest stars of professional football, before football became segregated from 1934 to 1946. In 1926, the name was changed back to the Akron Indians, after the earlier semi-pro team. Due to financial problems, the team suspended operations in 1927 and surrendered its franchise the following year.

Buffalo, New York had a turbulent, early-era National Football League team that operated under multiple names and several different owners between the 1910s and 1920s. The early NFL-era franchise was variously called the Buffalo All-Stars from 1915 to 1917, Buffalo Niagaras in 1918, the Buffalo Prospects in 1919, Buffalo All-Americans from 1920 to 1923, Buffalo Bisons from 1924 to 1925 and in 1927 and 1929, and the Buffalo Rangers in 1926. The franchise, which was experiencing financial problems in 1928, did not participate in league play that season.

The Cleveland Tigers were the first Cleveland team franchise in what became the National Football League (NFL). The Tigers played in the "Ohio League" before joining the American Professional Football Association during the 1920 and 1921 seasons.

The New York Giants were a professional American football team with the American Professional Football Association whose only season played was in 1921. The team has also been referred to as the Brooklyn Giants and Brickley's Brooklyn Giants. The Brickley's Giants were the first of 17 professional football teams to represent New York City at one time or another. The team was founded in 1919 by Charles Brickley, who received All-American honors while at Harvard. Brickley's Giants played two games in their only season, losing to the Buffalo All-Americans, 55–0, and the Cleveland Tigers, 17–0. It was the second-shortest-lived franchise in NFL history, behind only another former New York NFL team, the Tonawanda Kardex, who played only one game in the same 1921 season.

The 1920 APFA season was the inaugural season of the American Professional Football Association, renamed the National Football League in 1922. The league was formed on August 20, 1920, by independent professional American football teams from Ohio, all of whom had previously played in the Ohio League or New York Pro Football League (NYPFL). At the meeting, they first called their new league the American Professional Football Conference. A second organizational meeting was held in Canton on September 17, adding more teams to the league, and at the meeting, the name of the league became the American Professional Football Association. Four other teams also joined the Association during the year. Meanwhile, Jim Thorpe of the Canton Bulldogs was named the APFA's first president but continued to play for the team.

Philadelphia Quakers (AFL)

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James Richard Collier is a former American football tight end who played professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for the New York Giants and the Washington Redskins. He played college football at the University of Arkansas and was drafted in the seventh round of the 1961 NFL Draft. Collier was also selected in the 31st round of the 1962 AFL Draft by the Buffalo Bills. Collier scored the only touchdown for the New York Giants in the 1962 championship game when he recovered a blocked Packers' punt on the goal line.

1920 Akron Pros season

The 1920 Akron Pros season was the franchise's inaugural season with the American Professional Football Association (APFA) and twelfth total season as a team. The Pros entered the season coming off a 5–5 record in 1919 as the Akron Indians in the Ohio League. The Indians were sold to Art Ranney and Frank Nied, two businessmen, to help achieve a better record and crowd. Several representatives from the Ohio League wanted to form a new professional league; thus, the APFA was created.

The Massillon Tigers were an early professional football team from Massillon, Ohio. Playing in the "Ohio League", the team was a rival to the pre-National Football League version of the Canton Bulldogs. The Tigers won Ohio League championships in 1903, 1904, 1905, and 1906, then merged to become "All-Massillons" to win another title in 1907. The team returned as the Tigers in 1915 but, with the reemergence of the Bulldogs, only won one more Ohio League title. Pro football was popularized in Ohio when the amateur Massillon Tigers, hired four Pittsburgh pros to play in the season-ending game against Akron. At the same time, pro football declined in the Pittsburgh area, and the emphasis on the pro game moved west from Pennsylvania to Ohio.

The 1920 Buffalo All-Americans season was the franchise's inaugural season with the American Professional Football Association (APFA), an American football league, and fifth total as a team. The All-Americans entered 1920 coming off a 9–1–1 record in 1919 as the Buffalo Prospects in the New York Pro Football League (NYPFL). Several representatives from another professional football league, the Ohio League, wanted to form a new national league, and thus the APFA was created.

1920 Canton Bulldogs season

The 1920 Canton Bulldogs season was the franchise's sixteenth and its first in the American Professional Football Association (APFA), which became the National Football League two years later. Jim Thorpe, the APFA's president, was Canton's coach and a back who played on the team. The Bulldogs entered the season coming off a 9–0–1 performance as Ohio League champions in 1919. The team opened the season with a 48–0 victory over the Pitcairn Quakers, and finished with a 7–4–2 record, taking eighth place in the 14-team APFA. A then-record crowd of 17,000 fans watched Canton's week 12 game against Union AA of Phoenixville.

The 1920 Chicago Tigers season was their sole season in the National Football League. The team finished 2–5–1, tying them for eleventh in the league.

The 1920 Cleveland Tigers season was the franchise's inaugural season in the American Professional Football Association (APFA) and fifth total as an American football team. The Tigers entered the season coming off a 5-win, 2-loss, 2-tie (5–2–2) record in 1919. After the 1919 season, several representatives from the Ohio League, a loose organization of professional football teams, wanted to form a new professional league; thus, the APFA was created.

The 1920 Columbus Panhandles season was the franchise's inaugural season in the American Professional Football Association (APFA)—later named the National Football League. The season concluded with the team going 2–7–2 and finishing 13th place in the APFA standings. The Panhandles entered the season after a 3–6–1 record in 1919. The team opened the 1920 season with a loss to the Dayton Triangles, and the Panhandles lost five straight until a victory over the Zanesville Mark Greys. Not a single player was on the All-Pro list.

The 1920 Dayton Triangles season was the franchise's inaugural season in the American Professional Football Association (AFPA)—later named the National Football League. The Triangles entered the season coming off a 5–2–1 record in 1919 in the Ohio League. After the 1919 season, several representatives from the Ohio League wanted to form a new professional league; thus, the APFA was created. A majority of the team stayed from the 1919 team, including the coaching staff, while two players left the team.

The 1920 Muncie Flyers season was the franchise's inaugural season in the American Professional Football League (APFA)—later named the National Football League. The Flyers entered the season coming off a 4–1–1 record in 1919. Several representatives from the Ohio League wanted to form a new professional league; thus, the APFA was created. The 1920 team only played in one game that counted in the standings: a 45–0 loss against the Rock Island Independents. This game and the Columbus Panhandles–Dayton Triangles on the same date is considered to be the first league game featuring two APFA teams. The Flyers tried to schedule other games, but the opponents canceled to play better teams. As a result, the Flyers had to play the rest of the season's game versus local teams. In week 10, the Flyers won a game against the Muncie Offers More AC for the Muncie City Championship. No players from the 1920 Muncie Flyers were listed on the 1920 All-Pro Team, and no player has been enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The 1920 Rochester Jeffersons season was the franchise's inaugural season in the American Professional Football Association (APFA) and thirteenth as an American football team. The Jeffersons entered 1920 coming off a six-win, two-loss, two-tie (6–2–2) record in the New York Pro Football League (NYPFL) where it lost the championship game to the Buffalo Prospects. Several representatives from another professional football league, the Ohio League, wanted to form a new national league, and thus the APFA was created.

The Union Club of Phoenixville was a professional football team based in Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. The team was the result of a 1919 merger between the Phoenixville Union Club and the upstart Phoenix Athletic Club. From 1907 until 1919, the Union Club was considered one of the best football teams in eastern Pennsylvania. However, in 1919 the upstart Phoenix Athletic Club signed many of the top players of the area, leaving the Union Club no choice but to merge with the Phoenix A.C. The team is best known for defeating the Canton Bulldogs 14-7, in 1920. The team however would fold in 1921.

The Akron Champs was the dominant name of a minor league baseball team that represented Akron, Ohio between 1905 and 1920.

The Canton Bulldogs were a professional American football team, based in Canton, Ohio. They played in the Ohio League from 1903 to 1906 and 1911 to 1919, and the American Professional Football Association, from 1920 to 1923 and again from 1925 to 1926. The Bulldogs would go on to win the 1916, 1917 and 1919 Ohio League championships. They were the NFL champions in 1922 and 1923. In 1921–1923, the Bulldogs played 25 straight games without a defeat, which as of 2019 remains an NFL record. As a result of the Bulldogs' early success along with the league being founded in the city, the Pro Football Hall of Fame is located in Canton. Jim Thorpe, the Olympian and renowned all-around athlete, was Canton's most-recognized player in the pre-NFL era.

References

  1. 1 2 Staff. "Robert Nash Dies at 84", The New York Times , February 2, 1977. Accessed July 11, 2018. "Born in Ireland, Mr. Nash spent his early years in Bernardsville, N. J."
  2. Bob Nash Stats, Pro-Football-Reference.com. Accessed July 11, 2018. "High School: Bernards (NJ)"
  3. Braunwart, Bob; Carroll, Bob (1981). "The First NFL Game(s)" (PDF). The Coffin Corner . Professional Football Researchers Association. 3 (2). Archived from the original (PDF) on March 2, 2012. Retrieved June 9, 2011.
  4. Willis, Chris; Horrigan, Joe (2005). Old Leather (1st ed.). Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. p. 39. ISBN   978-0-8108-5660-8.