Bob Waters

Last updated
Bob Waters
BobWaters-WesternCarolina.jpg
Waters as head coach at Western Carolina
No. 11
Position: Quarterback
Personal information
Born:(1938-06-22)June 22, 1938
Millen, Georgia
Died:May 29, 1989(1989-05-29) (aged 50)
Cullowhee, North Carolina
Career information
College: Presbyterian
NFL Draft: 1960  / Round: 7 / Pick: 83
Career history
As player:
As coach:
As administrator:
Career NFL statistics
TDINT:3–8
Yards:707
Passer rating:46.7
Player stats at NFL.com

Robert Lee Waters (June 22, 1938 – May 29, 1989) was an American football player, coach, and administrator, best known for his contributions to athletics at Western Carolina University. Waters coached the Western Carolina Catamounts football team for 20 seasons (1969–1988), and performed the dual role of athletic director from 1971 through 1986. [1] According to the university, "the evolution and success of the school's athletic programs, especially its football program, during that period can be attributed largely to his talents and personality". [2]

Contents

Early life

Waters grew up in Sylvania, Georgia, and was a successful athlete at Screven County High, receiving 11 varsity letters for his participation in three different sports. He initially entered Stetson University in DeLand, Florida, as a freshman quarterback and defensive back, but when Stetson dropped the school's football program at the end of his first season. Waters transferred to Presbyterian College in Clinton, South Carolina, where he served as a quarterback and defensive back on the college's team. The team was invited to the January 1960 Tangerine Bowl, meeting Middle Tennessee State; despite losing by a score of 21–12, Waters was named the game's most outstanding player. [3] Waters was a member of the Mu chapter of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity at Presbyterian College.

Professional career

The National Football League's San Francisco 49ers and American Football League's Los Angeles Chargers both drafted Waters in 1960. After signing with the 49ers, Waters finished his four-year career with three touchdown passes and eight interceptions. Waters' four years with the 49ers included one as a defensive back and four as quarterback.

Coach and administrator

Waters changed career in 1965, going to Presbyterian College as an assistant coach in 1966. After two seasons with Presbyterian, Waters moved back to the West Coast as an assistant at Stanford University.

In 1969, Waters took a football coaching job at Western Carolina, bringing in a victorious season for the 1969 Catamounts in his first year, only losing to his alma mater Presbyterian College. Under his guidance, the team made national rankings in 1972 and 1974, and he took the Catamounts to the 1983 NCAA Division I-AA Football Championship Game. According to the university's website, his tenure at Western Carolina produced "116 victories, 13 winning seasons and top 10 national finishes at three different levels (NAIA, NCAA Division II, NCAA Division I-AA)". [1] He coached 13 All-Americans and 36 All-Southern Conference players. During the 1971–1986 seasons, Waters also served as athletic director. During his service to the university, he directed Western Carolina's moves from NAIA to NCAA Division II, then to NCAA Division I, and gained entrance into the Southern Conference. He helped raise interest in the construction of E. J. Whitmire Stadium in 1974 and Hennon Stadium in 1986.

Death

In March 1989, during the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease), Waters was reassigned from his head coaching position by university chancellor Myron Coulter. [4] Waters died on May 29, 1989, at his home in Cullowhee, North Carolina, at the age of 50 following a six-year battle with the disease. [5] [6]

Legacy

In 1988, Waters was honored by Western Carolina, who named their playing field Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium. [7] Waters has been inducted into the South Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame, the Florida Citrus Bowl Hall of Fame, [8] and the Western Carolina Athletic Hall of Fame.

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsNCAA#
Western Carolina Catamounts (NCAA College Division / NCAA Division II independent)(1969–1976)
1969 Western Carolina9–1
1970 Western Carolina6–3
1971 Western Carolina4–6
1972 Western Carolina7–2–1
1973 Western Carolina6–3–1
1974 Western Carolina9–2L NCAA Division II First Round
1975 Western Carolina3–7
1976 Western Carolina6–4
Western Carolina Catamounts (Southern Conference)(1977–1988)
1977 Western Carolina6–4–12–2–15th
1978 Western Carolina6–54–2T–3rd
1979 Western Carolina6–52–47th
1980 Western Carolina3–7–12–4–15th
1981 Western Carolina4–73–46th
1982 Western Carolina6–54–23rd
1983 Western Carolina11–3–15–0–12ndL NCAA Division I-AA Championship 9
1984 Western Carolina8–35–22nd14
1985 Western Carolina4–6–12–4–1T–5th
1986 Western Carolina6–55–22nd
1987 Western Carolina4–72–4T–5th
1988 Western Carolina2–91–6T–7th
Western Carolina:116–94–6
Total:116–94–6

Related Research Articles

Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium is a 13,742-seat football stadium in Cullowhee, North Carolina. It opened in 1974 and is home to the Western Carolina University Catamounts football team. The field itself is named Bob Waters Field. The football facility is located on the south end of the WCU campus and is bordered by Cullowhee Creek on the west side; Jordan-Phillips Field House and WCU Weight Room on its north end, and the Liston B. Ramsey Regional Activity Center on the south end.

Sports in North Carolina

Athletes and sports teams from North Carolina compete at every level of competition in the United States including NASCAR, the NBA, the NFL, the NHL, leagues operated by the United Soccer League organization, and MLL, and along with several colleges and universities in various conferences across an array of divisions. North Carolina is a state known for minor league sports. There are also a number of indoor football, indoor soccer, minor league basketball, and minor league ice hockey teams throughout the state. For sport amateurs, the state holds the State Games of North Carolina each year.

Western Carolina Catamounts athletic teams of Western Carolina University

The Western Carolina Catamounts are the athletic teams of Western Carolina University. The Catamounts compete in the NCAA Division I Southern Conference. Western fields sixteen varsity sports teams. The Catamount football team competes in Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS).

Western Carolina Catamounts football

The Western Carolina Catamounts football program is the intercollegiate American football team for the Western Carolina University located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. The team competes in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) and are members of the Southern Conference. The school's first football team was fielded in 1931. The team plays its home games at the 13,742 seat Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium. They are coached by Mark Speir.

Presbyterian Blue Hose football Football program representing Presbyterian College

The Presbyterian Blue Hose football program is the intercollegiate American football team for Presbyterian College located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. The team competes in the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) and are members of the Big South Conference. Presbyterian's first football team was fielded in 1913. The team plays its home games at the 6,500 seat Bailey Memorial Stadium in Clinton, South Carolina. The Blue Hose are coached by Tommy Spangler, who is in the first season of his second stint leading the team after being hired on November 22, 2016. Spangler was previously head coach from 2001–2006. The Blue Hose football program will be transitioning to the Pioneer Football League in 2021, at that point they will no longer be offering scholarships to their football student athletes.

2011 Western Carolina Catamounts football team American college football season

The 2011 Western Carolina Catamounts team represented Western Carolina University in the 2011 NCAA Division I FCS football season. The Catamounts were led by fourth year head coach Dennis Wagner and played their home games at Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium. They are a member of the Southern Conference. They finished the season 1–10, 0–8 in SoCon play to finish in last place

2012 Western Carolina Catamounts football team American college football season

The 2012 Western Carolina Catamounts football team represented Western Carolina University in the 2012 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Southern Conference. They were led by first year head coach Mark Speir and played their home games at Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium. They finished the season 1–10, 0–8 in SoCon play to finish in last place.

2013 Western Carolina Catamounts football team American college football season

The 2013 Western Carolina Catamounts football team represented Western Carolina University in the 2013 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Southern Conference. They were led by second year head coach Mark Speir and played their home games at Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium. The Catamounts entered this season with a new defensive coordinator, Shawn Quinn, who joined the team after serving two seasons in the same position at Charleston Southern University. They finished the season 2–10, 1–7 in SoCon play to finish in a tie for eighth place.

The 1975 NCAA Division II football season, part of college football in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the Division II level, began in September and concluded with the Division II Championship on December 13 at Hughes Stadium in Sacramento, California.

2014 Western Carolina Catamounts football team American college football season

The 2014 Western Carolina Catamounts football team represented Western Carolina University in the 2014 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Southern Conference. They were led by third year head coach Mark Speir and played their home games at Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium. They finished the season 7–5, 5–2 in SoCon play to finish in a tie for second place.

2015 Western Carolina Catamounts football team American college football season

The 2015 Western Carolina Catamounts football team represented Western Carolina University in the 2015 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Southern Conference. They were led by fourth year head coach Mark Speir and played their home games at Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium. They finished the season 7–4, 5–2 in SoCon play to finish in third place.

2016 Western Carolina Catamounts football team American college football season

The 2016 Western Carolina Catamounts football team represented Western Carolina University in the 2016 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Southern Conference. They were led by fifth year head coach Mark Speir and played their home games at Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium. They finished the season 2–9, 1–7 in SoCon play to finish in a tie for eighth place.

The 1967 Tangerine Bowl was an NCAA College Division game following the 1967 season, between West Chester and Tennessee–Martin. The most valuable players were defensive end Gordon Lambert and quarterback Errol Hook, both of Tennessee–Martin.

The 1963 Tangerine Bowl was an NCAA College Division game following the 1963 season, between the Western Kentucky Hilltoppers and the Coast Guard Bears. Western Kentucky quarterback Sharon Miller was named the game's most valuable player.

2017 Western Carolina Catamounts football team American college football season

The 2017 Western Carolina Catamounts football team represented Western Carolina University in the 2017 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Southern Conference. They were led by sixth-year head coach Mark Speir and played their home games at Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium. They finished the season 7–5, 5–3 in SoCon play to finish in fourth place.

2018 NCAA Division I FCS football season

The 2018 NCAA Division I FCS football season, part of college football in the United States, was organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) at the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (FCS) level. The FCS Championship Game was played on January 5, 2019, in Frisco, Texas. North Dakota State claimed its second consecutive FCS title, and seventh in eight years.

2018 Western Carolina Catamounts football team American college football season

The 2018 Western Carolina Catamounts football team represented Western Carolina University in the 2018 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). They were led by seventh-year head coach Mark Speir and played their home games at Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium. They finished the season 3–8, 1–7 in SoCon play to finish in eighth place.

2019 Western Carolina Catamounts football team American college football season

The 2019 Western Carolina Catamounts football team represents Western Carolina University in the 2019 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). They are led by eighth-year head coach Mark Speir and play their home games at Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium.

2020 Western Carolina Catamounts football team American college football season

The 2020 Western Carolina Catamounts football team will represent Western Carolina University in the 2020 NCAA Division I FCS football season as a member of the Southern Conference (SoCon). They will be led by ninth-year head coach Mark Speir and play their home games at Bob Waters Field at E. J. Whitmire Stadium.

References

  1. 1 2 "E.J. Whitmire Stadium/Bob Waters Field". Archived from the original on 2009-01-03. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
  2. "Tribute to a Champion - the Bob Waters' Legacy :: Western Carolina's legendary football coach and administrator from 1969-88". Archived from the original on 2008-05-11. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
  3. Bassine, Bob (January 3, 1960). "Tangerine Bowl Tilt Called Day's Finest". Orlando Sentinel . p. 1-D. Retrieved March 10, 2017 via newspapers.com.
  4. Jarrett, Keith (March 31, 1989). "Reaction To Waters Ouster Varied". The Asheville Citizen . Asheville, North Carolina. p. 5B. Retrieved March 11, 2017 via newspapers.com.
  5. Jarrett, Keith (May 30, 1989). "Waters Remembered As Great Coach, Person". The Asheville Citizen . Asheville, North Carolina. p. 8B. Retrieved March 11, 2017 via newspapers.com.
  6. "Obituary; Bob Waters, 50; Active as a Coach Despite Long Illness". The New York Times . Associated Press. May 30, 1989. Retrieved July 27, 2019.
  7. "Western Carolina - Facilities". Archived from the original on 2009-01-03. Retrieved 2008-05-21.
  8. "College beat". Orlando Sentinel . June 29, 1987. p. C-4. Retrieved March 11, 2017 via newspapers.com.