Boise City, Oklahoma

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Boise City, Oklahoma
Boise City Courthouse.JPG
Cimarron County Oklahoma incorporated and unincorporated areas Boise City highlighted.svg
Location within Cimarron County and Oklahoma
Coordinates: 36°43′48″N102°30′41″W / 36.73000°N 102.51139°W / 36.73000; -102.51139 Coordinates: 36°43′48″N102°30′41″W / 36.73000°N 102.51139°W / 36.73000; -102.51139
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Cimarron
Founded1908
Incorporated 1925
Area
[1]
  Total1.45 sq mi (3.75 km2)
  Land1.45 sq mi (3.75 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
4,167 ft (1,270 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total1,266
  Estimate 
(2019) [2]
1,085
  Density748.79/sq mi (289.03/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (CST)
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
73933
Area code(s) 580
FIPS code 40-07300 [3]
GNIS ID 1090365 [4]

Boise City /ˈbɔɪs/ is a city in and the county seat of Cimarron County, in the Panhandle of Oklahoma, United States. [5] The population was 1,266 at the 2010 census, a decline of 14.6 percent from 1,483 in 2000. [6]

Contents

History

Boise City was founded in 1908 by developers J. E. Stanley, A. J. Kline, and W. T. Douglas (all doing business as the Southwestern Immigration and Development Company of Guthrie, Oklahoma) who published and distributed brochures promoting the town as an elegant, tree-lined city with paved streets, numerous businesses, railroad service, and an artesian well. [lower-alpha 1] They sold 3,000 lots to buyers who discovered, on their arrival, that none of the information in the brochure was true. In addition to using false publicity, the three men did not have title to the lots they sold.

Stanley and Kline were convicted of mail fraud and sent to Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary. Stanley and Kline served two-year terms in the penitentiary. Douglas died of tuberculosis before beginning his sentence. The town nevertheless took shape and incorporated on July 20, 1925. [5]

The Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture says that the origin of the town name is unclear, but offers three possibilities: (1) a Captain Boice who was a hero in the Civil War, (2) the town of Boise, Idaho or (3) the Boise Cattle Company, which ran cattle in the area. [5] It was speculated in Ken Burns' documentary, The Dust Bowl (film), that the town name was chosen as part of the original land scam to infer a false image of the town, as "boisé" is French for "wooded".

Boise City's prosperity in the 1930s, like that of Cimarron County generally, was severely affected by its location at the heart of the Dust Bowl region. [7] [8]

Boise City was the location of an unusual event during World War II when it was mistakenly bombed by a friendly U.S. bomber crew during training. The bombing occurred on July 5, 1943, at approximately 12:30 a.m. by a B‑17 Flying Fortress Bomber. [9] This occurred because pilots performing target practice became disoriented and mistook the lights around the town square as their target. No one was killed in the attack (only practice bombs were used and the square was deserted at the time), but the pilots were embarrassed. For the 50th anniversary of the incident, the crew of the bomber was invited back to Boise City, but all members declined. The former radio operator did, however, send an audio tape that was played at the celebration. [10]

Geography

Boise City is located at 36°43′48″N102°30′41″W / 36.73000°N 102.51139°W / 36.73000; -102.51139 (36.730115, -102.511419). [11] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.3 square miles (3.4  km2 ), all land.

Climate

Boise City experiences a semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk) with mild, dry winters and long, hot, wetter summers. There is a large degree of diurnal temperature variation year-round.

According to weather data tallied between July 1, 1985 and June 30, 2015 for every location in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's official climate database, Boise City, Oklahoma, is the snowiest place in the state of Oklahoma with an average of 30.8 inches of snow per year. [12]

Climate data for Boise City, OK (Data for 19082012)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °F (°C)80
(27)
85
(29)
91
(33)
97
(36)
108
(42)
108
(42)
107
(42)
105
(41)
105
(41)
96
(36)
87
(31)
84
(29)
108
(42)
Average high °F (°C)48.9
(9.4)
52.9
(11.6)
60.6
(15.9)
70.0
(21.1)
78.3
(25.7)
88.3
(31.3)
92.8
(33.8)
90.5
(32.5)
83.1
(28.4)
72.3
(22.4)
59.4
(15.2)
49.5
(9.7)
70.5
(21.4)
Average low °F (°C)19.3
(−7.1)
22.5
(−5.3)
28.5
(−1.9)
38.0
(3.3)
47.4
(8.6)
57.4
(14.1)
62.5
(16.9)
61.0
(16.1)
52.9
(11.6)
40.7
(4.8)
28.6
(−1.9)
21.1
(−6.1)
40.0
(4.4)
Record low °F (°C)−24
(−31)
−16
(−27)
−12
(−24)
6
(−14)
20
(−7)
31
(−1)
39
(4)
36
(2)
25
(−4)
9
(−13)
−7
(−22)
−17
(−27)
−24
(−31)
Average precipitation inches (mm)0.43
(11)
0.45
(11)
0.96
(24)
1.29
(33)
2.39
(61)
2.44
(62)
2.50
(64)
2.67
(68)
1.61
(41)
1.32
(34)
0.71
(18)
0.56
(14)
17.33
(440)
Average snowfall inches (cm)4.8
(12)
3.8
(9.7)
5.4
(14)
1.6
(4.1)
0.3
(0.76)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.1
(0.25)
0.9
(2.3)
3.0
(7.6)
5.4
(14)
25.5
(65)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in)3.13.44.94.77.07.07.16.34.63.43.22.857.5
Source: The Western Regional Climate Center [13]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1930 1,256
1940 1,144−8.9%
1950 1,90266.3%
1960 1,9784.0%
1970 1,9930.8%
1980 1,761−11.6%
1990 1,509−14.3%
2000 1,483−1.7%
2010 1,266−14.6%
2019 (est.)1,085 [2] −14.3%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the census [3] of 2000, there were 1,483 people, 610 households, and 400 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,180.6 people per square mile (454.4/km2). There were 752 housing units at an average density of 598.7 per square mile (230.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 81.7% White, 0.2% African American, 1.7% Native American, 0.3% Asian, 13.4% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 21.0% of the population.

There were 610 households, out of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.1% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.3% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 18.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 26.2% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 21.7% from 25 to 44, 24.3% from 45 to 64, and 21.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $30,071, and the median income for a family was $35,761. Males had a median income of $23,088 versus $17,679 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,821. About 14.7% of families and 19.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.0% of those under age 18 and 12.3% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

The local economy is based on ranching, farming, and the production of oil and natural gas. [5]

The local paper, starting as the Cimarron News in 1898 in Kenton, Oklahoma, has been known as The Boise City News since 1930. [14] Calling itself The Official Newspaper of Cimarron County, it is available in both print and digital editions. [15]

Transportation

Highways include US Route 412, US Route 385, US Route 287 (which skirts just north of the town), and State Highway 325. [16]

The Boise City Airport, which serves all of the county, is located approximately six miles north of town center. [17]

Commercial air transport is available out of Liberal Mid-America Regional Airport in Kansas [18] about 99 miles east-northeast of town, [19] or the larger Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport in Texas [20] about 127 miles south-southeast of town. [21]

Attractions

The Cimarron Heritage Center Museum includes exhibits and artifacts on dinosaurs, the Santa Fe Trail and other local historic sites. [22] The museum grounds showcase a restored Santa Fe Depot, a blacksmith shop, a one-room schoolhouse, a windmill exhibit, buggies, and more. [22] The grounds are home to "Cimmy" the “Cimarronasaurus,” a metal sculpture 65 ft. long and 35 ft. tall, said to be a life-sized Aptosaurus dinosaur cut-out calculated from the bones of a dinosaur that was actually excavated in western Cimarron County in the 1930s. [23] [24]

The Cimarron County Chamber of Commerce is located in a red train caboose. [25] Out front of the caboose is featured the Boise City Bomb Memorial, commemorating the accidental 1943 aerial bombardment. [26]

Autograph Rock Historic District, containing rutted traces of the Cimarron Cutoff of the Santa Fe Trail, features Autograph Rock, inscribed with the names of travelers from the 1850-1865 era. [27] Access to the site can be granted at the Cimarron Heritage Center Museum. [22] The separate Cold Spring and Inscription Rock Historic District similarly features Inscription Rock with Santa Fe Trail travelers’ names inscribed, but also has a former camp site with a stone building that served as a stagecoach station, and a stone spring house. [28]

The Cimarron County Courthouse was designed by M.C. Parker in the Classical Revival and Neoclassical styles and constructed in red brick. It opened in 1926 after the previous wood frame courthouse burned down. [29]

Notable person

See also

Notes

  1. They had claimed that three railroads were coming through the town. In fact, only the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad ever came through Boise City, and that was not until 1925. [5]

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References

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  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  4. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 Young, Norma Gene. "Boise City," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. Accessed June 17, 2015.
  6. CensusViewer:Boise City, Oklahoma Population. Retrieved December 4, 2013.
  7. Seelye, Katharine Q. "Survivor of Dust Bowl Now Battles a Fiercer Drought." New York Times. May 3, 2011. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  8. Parker, Laura. "Parched: A New Dust Bowl Forms in the Heartland." National Geographic." May 17, 2014. Accessed July 23, 2017.
  9. "War: The Bombing of Boise City". Time. July 19, 1943.
  10. Dary, David (10 March 2015). "Bombed-Out Boise City". This Land Press . Retrieved 11 March 2015.
  11. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  12. "The Snowiest Place in Each State" . Retrieved 2015-01-24.
  13. "Seasonal Temperature and Precipitation Information". Western Regional Climate Center. Retrieved April 4, 2013.
  14. "About the Boise City news". Library of Congress. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  15. "The Boise City News". Facebook. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  16. "Boise City, OK". Google Maps. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  17. "Boise City Airport to Boise, OK". Google Maps. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  18. "Liberal Mid-America Regional Airport". City of Liberal. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  19. "Liberal Airport to Guymon, Oklahoma". Google Maps. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  20. "Welcome". Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  21. "Rick Husband Amarillo International Airport to Boise City, Oklahoma". Google Maps. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  22. 1 2 3 "Cimarron Heritage Center Museum". TravelOK.com. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  23. "Boise City, Oklahoma: Life-Size Metal Dinosaur". RoadsideAmerica.com. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  24. "Cimmy the Dinosaur". TravelOK.com. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  25. "Cimarron County Chamber of Commerce". Facebook. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  26. The Memorial may have been taken in, temporarily or permanently. "Boise City Bomb Memorial". Roadtrippers. Retrieved September 10, 2020.
  27. "Autograph Rock Historic District". Oklahoma. Archived from the original on 2010-06-22.
  28. "Cold Spring and Inscription Rock Historic District". Oklahoma. Archived from the original on 2010-06-20. Retrieved 2013-07-07.
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  30. Foley, Jr., Hugh W. "Vera Miles," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture, Oklahoma Historical Society; accessed May 5, 2015.

Further reading