Bonne of Armagnac

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Bonne of Armagnac
Duchess of Orléans

Charles of Orleans & Bonne of Armagnac Marriage.jpg

Marriage of Charles and Bonne at the Chateau de Dourdan – from the Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry
Born 19 February 1399
Lavardens
Died 1430–35
Castelnau-de-Montmiral
Spouse Charles, Duke of Orléans
House Armagnac
Father Bernard VII, Count of Armagnac
Mother Bonne of Berry

Bonne of Armagnac (19 February 1399 – 1430/35) was the eldest daughter of Bernard VII, Count of Armagnac and Constable of France, and of Bonne of Berry.

Bernard VII, Count of Armagnac French general

Bernard VII, Count of Armagnac was Count of Armagnac and Constable of France. He was the son of John II and Jeanne de Périgord. He succeeded in Armagnac at the death of his brother, John III, in 1391. After prolonged fighting, he also became Count of Comminges in 1412.

Bonne of Berry Countess of Savoy

Bonne of Berry was the daughter of John, Duke of Berry, and Joanna of Armagnac. Through her father, she was a granddaughter of John II of France.

Contents

Marriage

On 15 August 1410 at the age of 11, she married Charles, Duke of Orléans (left an orphan by his father Louis's assassination in 1407). [1] This marriage made the constable not only Charles's father-in-law but also his natural defender. The Orléans party, left without a leader by Louis's death, thus became the Armagnac party, the name it held up to the treaty of Arras in 1435. [1]

Charles, Duke of Orléans French duke and poet

Charles of Orléans was Duke of Orléans from 1407, following the murder of his father, Louis I, Duke of Orléans, on the orders of John the Fearless, Duke of Burgundy. He was also Duke of Valois, Count of Beaumont-sur-Oise and of Blois, Lord of Coucy, and the inheritor of Asti in Italy via his mother Valentina Visconti, daughter of Gian Galeazzo Visconti, Duke of Milan.

The Armagnac Faction was prominent in French politics and warfare during the Hundred Years' War. It was allied with the supporters of Charles, Duke of Orléans against John the Fearless after Charles' father Louis of Orléans was killed on a Paris street on the orders of the Duke of Burgundy on 23 November 1407.

Following the French defeat at the Battle of Agincourt on 25 October 1415, Charles was taken prisoner by the English. Bonne had not borne any children prior to his imprisonment. She died sometime between 1430 and 1435 while her husband was still in captivity.

Battle of Agincourt English victory in the Hundred Years War

The Battle of Agincourt was one of the greatest English victories in the Hundred Years' War. It took place on 25 October 1415 near Azincourt in the County of Saint-Pol, in northern France. England's unexpected victory against a numerically superior French army boosted English morale and prestige, crippled France, and started a new period in the war during which the English began enjoying great military successes.

In literature and art

Bonne appears in the critically acclaimed historical novel Het woud der verwachting (1949) by Hella Haasse, (translated into English in 1989 under the title " In a Dark Wood Wandering "). The novel portrays the life of Bonne's husband Charles.

Hella Haasse Dutch writer

Hélène "Hella" Serafia Haasse was a Dutch writer, often referred to as "the Grand Old Lady" of Dutch literature, and whose novel Oeroeg (1948) was a staple for generations of Dutch schoolchildren. Her internationally acclaimed magnum opus is "Heren van de Thee", translated to "The Tea Lords". In 1988 Haasse was chosen to interview the Dutch Queen for her 50th birthday after which celebrated Dutch author Adriaan van Dis called Haasse "the Queen among authors".

<i>In a Dark Wood Wandering</i>

In a Dark Wood Wandering is a 1949 Dutch novel by Hella S. Haasse. It was translated into English in 1989 by Edith and Kalman Kaplan and Anita Miller.

Charles and Bonne's marriage at the Chateau de Dourdan is depicted in the elaborate illuminated manuscript entitled Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry (Very Rich Hours of the Duke of Berry). It was created between c.1412 to 1416, and is considered one of the very best surviving examples. Because it is contemporary with the events depicted, it is an important resource for more accurately understanding the clothing worn by various classes, and other historical aspects of the period, unlike many imagined versions in paintings created in Victorian period. In addition, the individual persons depicted, although not detailed, may be accurate.

Illuminated manuscript manuscript in which the text is supplemented by the addition of decoration

An illuminated manuscript is a manuscript in which the text is supplemented with such decoration as initials, borders (marginalia) and miniature illustrations. In the strictest definition, the term refers only to manuscripts decorated with either gold or silver; but in both common usage and modern scholarship, the term refers to any decorated or illustrated manuscript from Western traditions. Comparable Far Eastern and Mesoamerican works are described as painted. Islamic manuscripts may be referred to as illuminated, illustrated or painted, though using essentially the same techniques as Western works.

Ancestry

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References

  1. 1 2 Neillands, p. 196.

Sources

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