Borussia-Park

Last updated

Borussia-Park
Stadion Gladbach.jpg
LocationHennes-Weisweiler-Allee 1, Mönchengladbach, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
Owner Borussia Mönchengladbach
OperatorBorussia VfL 1900 Mönchengladbach GmbH
Capacity 54,057 (League Matches)
46,249 (International Matches)
Field size105 × 68 m
Surfacegrass
Construction
Opened30 July 2004
Construction cost 85 million
ArchitectMarc Laurens
Tenants
Borussia Mönchengladbach (2004–present)
Germany national football team (selected matches)

Borussia-Park (German pronunciation: [boˈʁʊsi̯aːˌpaʁk] ; stylised as BORUSSIA-PARK) is a football stadium in Mönchengladbach, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany which serves as the home stadium of Bundesliga club Borussia Mönchengladbach. It replaced the smaller Bökelbergstadion, which no longer satisfied modern safety standards and international requirements, in July 2004.

Association football Team field sport

Association football, more commonly known as football or soccer, is a team sport played with a spherical ball between two teams of eleven players. It is played by 250 million players in over 200 countries and dependencies, making it the world's most popular sport. The game is played on a rectangular field called a pitch with a goal at each end. The object of the game is to score by moving the ball beyond the goal line into the opposing goal.

Stadium place or venue for (mostly) outdoor sports, concerts, or other events

A stadium is a place or venue for (mostly) outdoor sports, concerts, or other events and consists of a field or stage either partly or completely surrounded by a tiered structure designed to allow spectators to stand or sit and view the event.

Mönchengladbach Place in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

Mönchengladbach is a city in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is located west of the Rhine, halfway between Düsseldorf and the Dutch border.

Contents

Borussia-Park has a capacity of 54,057, of which 16,145 are standing places in the terraces due to popular demand. For international games, the terraces are converted into temporary seating which reduces stadium's seating capacity to 46,249.[ citation needed ]

Terrace (stadium) traditional standing area of a sports stadium

A terrace or terracing in sporting terms refers to the traditional standing area of a sports stadium, particularly in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. A terrace is a series of concrete steps which are erected for spectators to stand on.

Seating capacity number of people who can be seated in a specific space, in terms of both the physical space available, and limitations set by law

Seating capacity is the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, in terms of both the physical space available, and limitations set by law. Seating capacity can be used in the description of anything ranging from an automobile that seats two to a stadium that seats hundreds of thousands of people. The largest sporting venue in the world, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, has a permanent seating capacity for more than 235,000 people and infield seating that raises capacity to an approximate 400,000.

The new stadium features amenities such as VIP lounges, fanshop and sports bar, and cost 85 million euro to construct.

Euro European currency

The euro is the official currency of 19 of the 28 member states of the European Union. This group of states is known as the eurozone or euro area, and counts about 343 million citizens as of 2019. The euro is the second largest and second most traded currency in the foreign exchange market after the United States dollar. The euro is subdivided into 100 cents.

Despite its large capacity and relative youth, the stadium missed out on holding matches during the 2006 World Cup, which Germany hosted. It was the largest capacity Bundesliga stadium not to host World Cup matches, although it did host matches in the 2011 Women's World Cup. It faced the same destiny when there was selected venues for Germany's first bid as united nation for the UEFA flagship event as EURO 2024.

2006 FIFA World Cup 18th FIFA World Cup, held in Germany in 2006

The 2006 FIFA World Cup was the 18th FIFA World Cup, the quadrennial international football world championship tournament. It was held from 9 June to 9 July 2006 in Germany, which won the right to host the event in July 2000. Teams representing 198 national football associations from all six populated continents participated in the qualification process which began in September 2003. Thirty-one teams qualified from this process, along with the host nation, Germany, for the finals tournament. It was the second time that Germany staged the competition, and the tenth time that it was held in Europe.

Bundesliga Association football league

The Bundesliga is a professional association football league in Germany and the football league with the highest average stadium attendance worldwide. At the top of the German football league system, the Bundesliga is Germany's primary football competition. The Bundesliga comprises 18 teams and operates on a system of promotion and relegation with the 2. Bundesliga. Seasons run from August to May. Most games are played on Saturdays and Sundays, with a few games played on weekdays. All of the Bundesliga clubs qualify for the DFB-Pokal. The winner of the Bundesliga qualifies for the DFL-Supercup.

2011 FIFA Womens World Cup 2011 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup was the sixth FIFA Women's World Cup competition, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It was held from 26 June to 17 July 2011 in Germany, which won the right to host the event in October 2007. Japan won the final against the United States on a penalty shoot-out following a 2–2 draw after extra time and became the first Asian team to win a senior FIFA World Cup.

Panoramic view of the stadium. Borussia-Park DEU-FRA 2011.jpg
Panoramic view of the stadium.

Related Research Articles

Borussia Mönchengladbach association football club in Mönchengladbach, Germany

Borussia VfL 1900 Mönchengladbach e.V., commonly known as Borussia Mönchengladbach, Mönchengladbach or Gladbach, is a professional football club based in Mönchengladbach, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, that plays in the Bundesliga, the top flight of German football. The club has won five League titles, three DFB-Pokals, and two UEFA Europa League titles.

Berti Vogts German footballer and manager

Hans-Hubert "Berti" Vogts is a former German footballer who played as a defender. He played for Borussia Mönchengladbach in the Bundesliga his whole professional club career and won the FIFA World Cup with West Germany in 1974. He later managed the national teams of Germany, Scotland, Nigeria and Azerbaijan.

Müngersdorfer Stadion German football stadium and home of 1. FC Köln

The Müngersdorfer Stadion, currently known as the RheinEnergieStadion for sponsorship purposes, is a German football stadium in Cologne. It was built on the site of the two previous Müngersdorfer stadiums. It is the home of the local Bundesliga team, 1. FC Köln. The stadium was one of 5 stadiums hosting both the 2005 FIFA Confederations Cup and 2006 FIFA World Cup. Local energy company RheinEnergie AG currently holds the naming rights to the stadium.

Mercedes-Benz Arena (Stuttgart) stadium in the city of Stuttgart, Germany

Mercedes-Benz Arena is a stadium located in Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany and home to German Bundesliga club VfB Stuttgart.

An all-seater stadium is a sports stadium in which every spectator has a seat. This is commonplace in professional association football stadiums in nations such as the United Kingdom, Spain, and the Netherlands. Most association football and American football stadiums in the United States and Canadian Football League stadiums in Canada are all-seaters, as are most baseball and track and field stadiums in those countries. A stadium that is not an all-seater has areas for attendees holding standing-room only tickets to stand and view the proceedings. Such standing areas were known as terraces in Britain. Stands with only terraces used to dominate the football attendance in the UK. For instance, the South Bank Stand behind the southern goal at Molineux Stadium, Wolverhampton, home of Wolverhampton Wanderers F.C., had a maximum of 32,000 standing attenders, while the rest of the stadium hosted a little bit less than that.

Bökelbergstadion football stadium

The Bökelbergstadion was a football stadium in Mönchengladbach, Germany.

Herbert Wimmer German footballer

Herbert "Hacki" Wimmer is a former footballer who played as a midfielder. Besides winning five national championships and two UEFA Cups with his club side Borussia Mönchengladbach he won the 1974 World Cup and the UEFA Euro 1972 with Germany.

Zdzisław Krzyszkowiak Stadium football stadium

Zdzisław Krzyszkowiak Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Bydgoszcz, Poland. It was completed in 1960 with a capacity of about 35,944 on wooden benches. The stadium was completely rebuilt in 2007–2008, and the current seating capacity is 20,247 people. It is currently used for football matches and track and field events. The stadium is named after Polish Olympic gold medal-winning runner Zdzisław Krzyszkowiak.

Horst-Dieter Höttges German footballer

Horst-Dieter Höttges is a German former footballer who played as a defender. Having started his career with hometown club Borussia Mönchengladbach, he spent most of his career with Werder Bremen. At international level, he represented West Germany from 1965 to 1974, amassing 66 caps and scoring 1 goal.

Stadion Rote Erde football stadium

Stadion Rote Erde is a 25,000 capacity football and athletics stadium in Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia. It serves as the home stadium to Borussia Dortmund II and several athletic clubs. The stadium was built in between 1924 and 1926 at a cost of 1.8 million German Mark. The stadium was inaugurated in 1926, with a match between the City of Dortmund and FC Wacker München (1-11).

Yann Sommer Swiss footballer

Yann Sommer is a Swiss footballer who plays as a goalkeeper for Borussia Mönchengladbach.

Wolfgang Stark German football referee

Wolfgang Stark is a German former football referee who is based in Ergolding. He refereed for DJK Altdorf of the Bavarian Football Association.

Marco Reus German footballer

Marco Reus is a German professional footballer who plays as a forward for the Germany national team and the Borussia Dortmund, where he is the captain.

The 2010–11 Bundesliga was the 48th season of the Bundesliga, Germany's premier football league. The season started on the weekend of 21 August 2010 with the traditional season opening match involving the defending champions and ended with the last games on 14 May 2011. The winter break was in effect between weekends around 18 December 2010 and 15 January 2011. The defending champions were Bayern Munich. The league had also updated its logo for the season. The official match ball is Adidas Torfabrik 2010.

The Telekom Cup is a German association football competition held since 2009.

The 2011–12 DFB-Pokal was the 69th season of the annual German football cup competition. It commenced on 29 July 2011 with the first of six rounds and concluded on 12 May 2012 with the final at the Olympiastadion in Berlin.

Westfalenstadion football stadium in the city of Dortmund, Germany

Westfalenstadion is a football stadium in Dortmund, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, which is the home of Borussia Dortmund. Officially called Signal Iduna Park[zɪɡˌnaːl ʔiˈduːnaː ˌpaʁk] for sponsorship reasons, the name derives from the former Prussian province of Westphalia.

The 2024 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Euro 2024 or simply Euro 2024, will be the 17th edition of the UEFA European Championship, the quadrennial international men's football championship of Europe organized by UEFA. Germany will host the tournament in June and July 2024.

The 2016–17 DFB-Pokal was the 74th season of the annual German football cup competition. Sixty-four teams participated in the competition, including all teams from the previous year's Bundesliga and the 2. Bundesliga. It began on 19 August 2016 with the first of six rounds and ended on 27 May 2017 with the final at the Olympiastadion in Berlin, a nominally neutral venue, which has hosted the final since 1985. The DFB-Pokal is considered the second-most important club title in German football after the Bundesliga championship. The DFB-Pokal is run by the German Football Association (DFB).

The 2017–18 DFB-Pokal was the 75th season of the annual German football cup competition. Sixty-four teams participated in the competition, including all teams from the previous year's Bundesliga and the 2. Bundesliga. The competition began on 11 August 2017 with the first of six rounds and ended on 19 May 2018 with the final at the Olympiastadion in Berlin, a nominally neutral venue, which has hosted the final since 1985. The DFB-Pokal is considered the second-most important club title in German football after the Bundesliga championship. The DFB-Pokal is run by the German Football Association (DFB).

References

Structurae online architecture database

Structurae is an online database containing pictures and information about structural and civil engineering works, and their associated engineers, architects, and builders. Its entries are contributed by volunteers and saved in a MySQL database.

Coordinates: 51°10′28.50″N6°23′7.67″E / 51.1745833°N 6.3854639°E / 51.1745833; 6.3854639