Bourke Award

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The Bourke Award of the Royal Society of Chemistry is an annual prize open to academics from outside the UK. Originally established by the Faraday Society and known as the Bourke Lectures, the award of £2000 enables experts in physical chemistry or chemical physics to present their work in the UK. The winner also receives a commemorative medal. [1]

Contents

Winners

Source: [2]

YearRecipient
2020 Sharon Hammes-Schiffer [3]
2019 David Beratan [4]
2018 Daniel M. Neumark
2017 Kieron Burke  [ Wikidata ] [5]
2016 Laura Gagliardi
2015 Lyndon Emsley
2014 Ann McDermott
2013 Bert Weckhuysen
2012 Gregory D. Scholes
2011 Mark Ratner
2010 Michael T. Bowers
2009 Gerard J. M. Meijer  [ de; nl ]
2008-09 Thomas R. Rizzo  [ Wikidata ]
2008 Ole G. Mouritsen  [ da ]
2007 George C. Schatz
2006 Christian Amatore
2005 Marsha I. Lester
2004 Paul D. Lett  [ Wikidata ]
2003 David A. Andelman
2002 David J. Nesbitt  [ Wikidata ]
2001 Ewine van Dishoeck
2000 Curt Wittig
1999 Daan Frenkel
1998 Terry A. Miller  [ Wikidata ]
1997 Rutger van Santen  [ de; nl ]
1996 Kenneth C. Showalter  [ Wikidata ]
1995 Stephen Leone
1994 Dieter M. Kolb  [ Wikidata ]
1993 Henk Lekkerkerker  [ Wikidata ]
1992 Richard J. Saykally
1991 Gerhard Ertl
1990 Keiji Morokuma  [ ja; zh; de ]
1989 Donald H. Levy
1988 Alexander Pines
1987 Martin Quack
1986 Lucien Monnerie  [ fr ]
1985 David Chandler
1984 Vladimir Ponec  [ Wikidata ]
1983 Eizi Hirota  [ Wikidata ]
1982 E. C. M. Clementi
1981 Robin M. Hochstrasser
1980 Adriano Zecchina  [ Wikidata ]
1979 Ora Kedem
1978 Antoni Dymanus  [ Wikidata ]
1977 Roy Gerald Gordon  [ Wikidata ]
1976 Pierre-Gilles de Gennes
1975 P Pimental [sic]
1974 Joshua Jortner
1973 Bogdan Baranowski  [ de; pl ]
1972 Ilya Prigogine
1971H Wolf
1970 E. Ulrich Franck  [ de ]
1968/69 William Klemperer
1967 Dudley R. Herschbach
G. Wilse Robinson  [ Wikidata ]
1966 S Sadron [sic], Harden M. McConnell
1965 Heinz Gerischer
1964 Stuart A. Rice
1963 Alfonso Maria Liquori  [ it ], Victor Talrose
1962 Manfred Eigen
Joan van der Waals
1961 Harold S. Johnston
1960 Harold J. Bernstein  [ Wikidata ]
A Perterlin [sic]
1959 Robert Gomer
V. V. Voevodsky  [ Wikidata ]
1958 Walter H. Stockmauer
Robert Harold Stokes
1957 Arend Joan Rutgers
Wilhelm Jost  [ de; pt ]
1956 Jan J. Hermans  [ Wikidata ]
1955 Donald Hornig

See also

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References

  1. "RSC Bourke Award". The Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  2. "RSC Bourke Award Previous Winners". The Royal Society of Chemistry. Retrieved 17 September 2018.
  3. "Bourke Award 2020" . Retrieved 16 February 2021.
  4. "Bourke Award 2019" . Retrieved 10 July 2019.
  5. "Kieron Burke wins 2017 Bourke Award from Britain's Royal Society of Chemistry". UCI News. 10 May 2017. Retrieved 5 October 2018.