Bowsprit

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Bowsprit held down by a bobstay Bowsprit (PSF).jpg
Bowsprit held down by a bobstay
Bowsprit with forestays and bobstays 952B4842-1 (28484335242).jpg
Bowsprit with forestays and bobstays

The bowsprit of a sailing vessel is a spar extending forward from the vessel's prow. The bowsprit is typically held down by a bobstay that counteracts the forces from the forestays. The word bowsprit is thought to originate from the Middle Low German word bōchsprētbōch meaning "bow" and sprēt meaning "pole". [1]

It is sometimes used to hold up the figurehead.

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Stays (nautical)

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Caïque

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In English, a chasse-marée is a specific, archaic type of decked commercial sailing vessel.

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Tongkang

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Lambo (boat)

The term lambo or lamba refer to two types of traditional boats from Indonesia.

Hickey Medical condition

A hickey, hickie or love bite in British English, is a bruise or bruise-like mark caused by kissing or sucking skin, usually on the neck or arm. While biting might be part of giving a hickey, sucking is sufficient to burst small superficial blood vessels under the skin.

Spritsail (square-rigged)

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Jibboom

A jibboom is a spar used to extend the length of a bowsprit on sailing ships. It can itself be extended further by a flying jib-boom. The heel end of the flying jib-boom is attached to the jib-boom, and the heel of the jib-boom to the bowsprit. The point of the flying jib-boom is generally the fore-most extent of a ship. The jib- and flying jib- booms carry the tacks of the jib and flying jib sails, respectively, and the stay for the fore topgallant mast and the royal stay.

Bajak

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References

  1. "Bowsprit". Dictionary.com. Retrieved 15 November 2012.

References