Boys' Life

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Boys' Life
Boys Life Oct2007.jpg
The cover of Boys' Life, October 2007 issue
Editorial DirectorMichael Goldman
Staff writersAaron Derr, Paula Murphey, Clay Swartz
Categories Boy Scouts of America
FrequencyMonthly
Publisher Boy Scouts of America [1]
Total circulation
(2013)
1,097,968 [2]
First issueMarch 1911 (regular edition)
CountryUnited States
Based in Irving, Texas
LanguageEnglish
Website http://www.boyslife.org
ISSN 0006-8608

Boys' Life is the monthly magazine of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). Its target readers are between the ages of 6 and 18. The magazine headquarters are in Irving, Texas. [3] [4] [5]

A magazine is a publication, usually a periodical publication, which is printed or electronically published. Magazines are generally published on a regular schedule and contain a variety of content. They are generally financed by advertising, by a purchase price, by prepaid subscriptions, or a combination of the three.

Boy Scouts of America Scouting organization in the United States

The Boy Scouts of America is the largest scouting organization and one of the largest youth organizations in the United States, with about 2.3 million youth participants and about one million adult volunteers. The BSA was founded in 1910, and since then, about 110 million Americans participated in BSA programs at some time in their lives. BSA is part of the international Scout Movement and became a founding member organization of the World Organization of the Scout Movement in 1922.

Irving, Texas City in Texas, United States

Irving is a principal city in Dallas County in the U.S. state of Texas and it is also an inner ring suburb of the city of Dallas. According to a 2017 estimate from the United States Census Bureau, the city population was 240,373 making it the thirteenth-most populous city in Texas and 93rd most populous city in the U.S. The city of Irving is part of the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex.

Contents

Boys' Life is published in two demographic editions. Both editions often have the same cover, but are tuned to the target audience through the inclusion of 16–20 pages of unique content per edition.

A book cover is any protective covering used to bind together the pages of a book. Beyond the familiar distinction between hardcovers and paperbacks, there are further alternatives and additions, such as dust jackets, ring-binding, and older forms such as the nineteenth-century "paper-boards" and the traditional types of hand-binding. The term "Bookcover" is often used for a book cover image in library management software. This article is concerned with modern mechanically produced covers.

A target audience is the intended audience or readership of a publication, advertisement, or other message. In marketing and advertising, it is a particular group of consumers within the predetermined target market, identified as the targets or recipients for a particular advertisement or message. Businesses that have a wide target market will focus on a specific target audience for certain messages to send, such as The Body Shops Mother's Day advertisements, which were aimed at the children and spouses of women, rather than the whole market which would have included the women themselves.

The first edition is suitable for the youngest members of Cub Scouting, the 6-to-10-year-old Cub Scouts and first-year Webelos Scouts. The second edition is appropriate for 11-to-18-year-old boys, which includes second-year Webelos through 18-year-old Boy Scouts, Varsity Scouts and Venturers. [6] If the subscription is obtained through registration in the Boy Scouts of America program, the publisher selects the appropriate edition based on the boy's age.

Cub Scouting (Boy Scouts of America)

Cub Scouting is part of the Scouting program of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), available to boys and girls from kindergarten through fifth grade, or 5 to 10 years of age and their families. Its membership is the largest of the five main BSA divisions. Cub Scouting is part of the worldwide Scouting movement and aims to promote character development, citizenship training, personal fitness, and leadership.

In June 2007, Boys' Life garnered four Distinguished Achievement Awards conferred by the Association of Educational Publishers (AEP), including Periodical of the Year. [7]

The Association of Educational Publishers (AEP) is a U.S. non-profit organization for educational publishers. It is active in public awareness campaigns on effective educational resources, as well as aiding communication between educational organizations, such as policy makers, teachers, educational foundations and associations, and the education media. It was founded in 1895 as Educational Press Association of America and was primarily a university-based association for most of its history. More information about the history and development of Educational Periodicals, Publishing companies and Educational Press Associations was recorded at the meeting of Experts in the Educational Press in Geneva, 14-18 July 1958.

The magazine's mascot is Pedro the Mailburro, who answers readers' letters and is the subject of a comic strip.

Mascot person, animal, or object thought to bring luck, or for fictional, representative spokespeople for consumer products

A mascot is any person, animal, or object thought to bring luck, or anything used to represent a group with a common public identity, such as a school, professional sports team, society, military unit, or brand name. Mascots are also used as fictional, representative spokespeople for consumer products, such as the rabbit used in advertising and marketing for the General Mills brand of breakfast cereal, Trix.

History

Norman Rockwell's first Boys' Life cover, 1913 Norman Rockwell- Scout at Ships Wheel.jpg
Norman Rockwell's first Boys' Life cover, 1913

In 1911, George S. Barton, of Somerville, Massachusetts, founded and published the first edition of Boys' Life magazine. It was edited by 18-year old Joe Lane of Providence, Rhode Island. [8] [9] He called it Boys' and Boy Scouts' Magazine. At that time there were three major competing Scouting organizations: the American Boy Scouts, New England Boy Scouts, and Boy Scouts of America (BSA). [1]

Somerville, Massachusetts City in Massachusetts, United States

Somerville is a city located directly to the northwest of Boston, and east of Cambridge, in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. As of 2010, the United States Census lists the city with a total population of 75,754 people, making it the most densely populated municipality in New England. As of 2010, it was the 16th most densely populated incorporated municipality in the country. Somerville was established as a town in 1842, when it was separated from Charlestown. In 2006, the city was named the best-run city in Massachusetts by the Boston Globe. In 1972, in 2009, and again in 2015, the city received the All-America City Award. It is home to Tufts University, which has its campus along the Somerville and Medford border.

Providence, Rhode Island Capital of Rhode Island

Providence is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state of Rhode Island and is one of the oldest cities in the United States. It was founded in 1636 by Roger Williams, a Reformed Baptist theologian and religious exile from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He named the area in honor of "God's merciful Providence" which he believed was responsible for revealing such a haven for him and his followers. The city is situated at the mouth of the Providence River at the head of Narragansett Bay.

The American Boy Scouts (ABS), officially American Boy Scout then United States Boy Scouts, officially United States Boy Scout, was an early American Scouting organization formed by William Randolph Hearst in 1910, following on from the formation of the Scouting movement by Robert Baden-Powell between 1903 and 1907. Near the end of its existence, the organizations also used the names American Cadets and U.S. Junior Military Forces.

Five thousand copies were printed of the first issue of Barton's Boys' Life, published on January 1, 1911. The more widely accepted first edition is the version published on March 1, 1911. With this issue, the magazine was expanded from eight to 48 pages, the page size was reduced, and a two-color cover was added. In 1912, the Boy Scouts of America purchased the magazine, and made it an official BSA magazine. [1] BSA paid $6,000, $1 per subscriber, for the magazine. [8]

Content

Boys' Life, September 1919 Boys-Life-cover 1919-09.jpg
Boys' Life, September 1919

Often, the version of Boys' Life geared towards older boys features buying guides for products such as cars, MP3 players, digital cameras, sunglasses, and more.

Boys' Life had in 2005 a monthly feature called "BL's Get Fit Guide". Each month highlighted a different aspect of physical health, such as diet, exercise, and drugs. Each month the magazine also features an unusual Boy Scout trip that most Scouts do not normally do. These trips range from a Philmont Scout Ranch adventure to a white water rafting trip.

In both versions, Boys' Life features a video game section, which, in addition to new video game reviews, contains cheats for a video game monthly. They also contain technology updates, as well as book reviews.

Content includes Special Features, Adventure Stories, Bank Street Classics, Entertainment, Environmental Issues, History, Sports, and Codemaster.

Comics have included Bible Stories, Pedro, Pee Wee Harris, Scouts in Action, Rupert the Invincible, The Tracy Twins (created by Dik Browne), Dink & Duff, Tiger Cubs, Webelos Woody, Norby, and John Christopher's The Tripods trilogy. Boys' Life contracted with the Johnstone and Cushing art agency to produce much of its early cartooning content. [10]

Feature columns include Electronics, Entertainment, Fast Facts, History, Hitchin' Rack With Pedro the Mailburro, Think and Grin (jokes page), Science, Scouting Around, and Sports. Two columns, Hobby Hows and Collecting, featured Scouts' own personal hobby tips and collections, with them being offered $10 for being published in the issue.

Pedro

Pedro is a fictional burro created as a mascot for the magazine. Pedro first appeared in 1947 according to an account in the magazine for June 1961 in which he appeared on the cover. Pedro's official function is "mailburro," and for years, he appeared at the beginning of the letters to the editor column. A short paragraph detailing Pedro's latest "adventure" was decorated with a cartoon version of the beast by cartoonist Reamer Keller. In every issue since 1989, Boys' Life included a column "written" by Pedro that later evolved into a department known as "Hitchin' Rack". Scouts could write a letter addressed to Pedro, and mail it to Irving, Texas, where the Boy Scouts of America (BSA) and Boys' Life magazine were headquartered. Responses would be published in the following edition of the magazine. Through his column, Pedro has given advice on camping gear, camping skills, and how to solve problems within with camping, fishing, backpacking, cooking, etc. The second cartoon was called "The Pedro Patrol". [11] In this comic, Pedro and a group of Boy Scouts taught the readers scouting skills. The comic was discontinued and replaced with "The Wacky Adventures of Pedro." This is a comics section in the magazine, drawn lately by Tom Eagan, then drawn by Tom Eaton, and starting in January 2016, Stephen Gilpin. He also regularly appears in videos and games on the magazine's website.

In 1970, Boys' Life Merchandise created a scarf using the Pedro logo. In the 1990s, Pedro started to appear on T-shirts, sweaters, hats, insignias, etc. Pedro became involved with the Merit Badge Series (the Boy Scouts' award system), showing techniques and tips on how to earn particular badges. This led to "Merit Badge Minute", a new column established in 2010, giving tips for three badges each month.

Contributors

Writers contributing over the years are Isaac Asimov, Bertrand R. Brinley, Catherine Drinker Bowen, Ray Bradbury, Van Wyck Brooks, Arthur C. Clarke, J. Allan Dunn, Bobby Fischer, Alex Haley, Robert A. Heinlein, William Hillcourt, John Knowles, Arthur B. Reeve, Ernest Thompson Seton, Zane Grey, and Isaac Bashevis Singer.

Noteworthy artists and photographers who have contributed over the years include Ansel Adams, Harrison Cady, [12] Joseph Csatari, Salvador Dalí, Philippe Halsman, Mike MacDonald, Norman Rockwell, and Jerome Rozen.

Donald Keith's "Time Machine" series of stories appeared between 1959 and 1989. Bobby Fischer wrote the chess column "Checkmate" from 1966 until 1969.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "History of Boys' Life Magazine". Archived from the original on April 28, 2003. Retrieved July 8, 2012.
  2. "Alliance for Audited Media Snapshot Report - 6/30/2013". Alliance for Audited Media. Archived from the original on January 23, 2017. Retrieved February 2, 2014.
  3. "Who We Are". Boys' Life. Retrieved December 5, 2015.
  4. Laura Robb (2000). Teaching Reading in Middle School. Scholastic Inc. p. 73. ISBN   978-0-590-68560-3 . Retrieved December 15, 2015.
  5. "Children's Magazines". Book Market. Retrieved February 1, 2016.
  6. "BSA at a Glance". Fact Sheet. Boy Scouts of America. Archived from the original on July 6, 2012. Retrieved July 8, 2012.
  7. "Boys' Life Wins No. 1 Periodical Of 2007". Scouting . Boy Scouts of America: 10. November – December 2007. Retrieved November 1, 2007.
  8. 1 2 Petterchak, Janice A. (2003). Lone Scout: W. D. Boyce and American Boy Scouting. Legacy Press. p. 76. ISBN   0-9653198-7-3.
  9. "Boys' Life, April 1911". Trussell.com. Retrieved November 27, 2008.
  10. "Funny Business: The Rise and Fall of Johnstone and Cushing," Hogan's Alley #12, 2005
  11. "Wayback Machine". Boys' Life magazine. December 20, 2010. Retrieved November 19, 2016.
  12. "Harrison Cady's Boys Life Birds Eye Views". ASIFA-Hollywood Animation Archive. Archived from the original on March 6, 2008. Retrieved March 23, 2008.