Bradley Barker

Last updated

Bradley Barker
Bradley Barker MPW 1915-11.jpg
Born(1883-01-18)January 18, 1883
DiedSeptember 29, 1951(1951-09-29) (aged 68)
New York City, U.S.
Occupation(s)Actor, film director
Years active1915-1930

Bradley Barker (January 18, 1883 September 29, 1951) was an American actor and film director of the silent era. [1] He also created sound effects for film and radio.

Contents

Born in Long Island, New York, Barker was a vaudeville performer and an actor in stock theater. [2] He appeared in 70 films between 1915 and 1928. He also directed seven films between 1929 and 1930.

After he worked as an actor, Barker began creating sound effects for radio programs and films. He provided the sound of the MGM lion on screen before the studio began using a recording of a real lion and provided sounds of a variety of animals on radio. [2] Radio programs on which he worked included Let's Pretend [3] and Little Orphan Annie . [3] :303

On September 29, 1951, Barker died at his home in New York City at age 68. [4]

Selected filmography

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Henry A. Barrows</span> American actor (1875–1945)

Henry Arthur Barrows was an American actor who appeared in films from 1913 to 1936.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Milton Sills</span> American actor

Milton George Gustavus Sills was an American stage and film actor of the early twentieth century.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Gibson Gowland</span> English film actor

Gibson Gowland was an English film actor.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Robert Z. Leonard</span> American film director (1889–1968)

Robert Zigler Leonard was an American film director, actor, producer, and screenwriter.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bert Lytell</span> American actor

Bertram Lytell was an American actor in theater and film during the silent film era and early talkies. He starred in romantic, melodrama, and adventure films.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Alfred Allen (actor)</span> American actor

Alfred Allen was an American silent film actor and author.

Arthur Nelson Millett, was an early American motion picture actor whose career was at its height in the silent film era.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Wallace MacDonald</span> Canadian actor

Wallace Archibald MacDonald was a Canadian silent film actor and film producer.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Martha Mattox</span> American actress

Martha Mattox was an American silent film actress most notable for her portrayal of Mammy Pleasant in the 1927 film The Cat and the Canary. She also played a role in Torrent (1926). She died from a heart ailment at age 53.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Otto Lederer</span> American actor

Otto Lederer was a Czech-American film actor. He appeared in 120 films between 1912 and 1933, most notably The Jazz Singer, the first full-length film to have sound sequences, and the Laurel and Hardy short You're Darn Tootin'.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Larry Steers</span> American actor

Lawrence Wells Steers was an American film actor. He appeared in more than 550 films between 1917 and 1951. He was born in Indiana, and died in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Herbert Prior</span> English actor

Herbert Prior was an English silent film actor. He appeared in more than 260 films between 1908 and 1934. He was born in Oxford, Oxfordshire, and died in Los Angeles, California.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jack Curtis (actor)</span> American actor (1880–1956)

Jack Curtis was an American actor of the silent era. He appeared in more than 150 films from 1915 to 1950. He was born in San Francisco, California and died in Hollywood, California. Curtis performed on stage and in vaudeville before he began working in films in 1915.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">J. Barney Sherry</span> American actor

J. Barney Sherry was an American actor of the silent film era. He appeared in more than 210 films between 1905 and 1929. He was born in Germantown, Pennsylvania and died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from cardiovascular disease.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Charles Clary</span> American actor

Charles Clary was an American actor of the silent film era. Clary appeared in more than 200 films between 1910 and 1930. He was born in Charleston, Illinois and died on his 58th birthday in Los Angeles, California. He worked for Selig and the Fine Arts Film Company. Before Clary joined Selig, he "played stock companies and road shows all over America".

<span class="mw-page-title-main">J. P. Lockney</span> American actor

John P. Lockney was an American actor of the silent film era. He appeared in more than 100 films between 1915 and 1937. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">George Fawcett</span> American actor

George Fawcett was an American stage and film actor of the silent era.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">William Welsh (actor)</span> American actor

William Welsh was an American actor of the silent era. He appeared in 153 films between 1912 and 1936. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and died in Los Angeles, California at age 76.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Shirley Mason (actress)</span> American actress

Shirley Mason was an American actress of the silent era.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jay Morley</span> American actor

Jay Morley, was an American actor, active in silent films.

References

  1. Soister, John T.; Nicolella, Henry; Joyce, Steve (January 10, 2014). American Silent Horror, Science Fiction and Fantasy Feature Films, 1913-1929. McFarland. ISBN   9780786487905 . Retrieved April 14, 2019 via Google Books.
  2. 1 2 Goldstein, Alvin H. (December 13, 1942). "Big Noise in Radio and Screen World". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. p. 66. Retrieved September 27, 2020 via Newspapers.com.
  3. 1 2 Terrace, Vincent (1999). Radio Programs, 1924-1984: A Catalog of More Than 1800 Shows. McFarland & Company, Inc. p. 195. ISBN   978-0-7864-4513-4.
  4. "Bradley Barker Dies; MGM's 1st Lion Mimic". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Associated Press. September 30, 1951. p. 13. Retrieved September 28, 2020 via Newspapers.com.