Brazilian Football Confederation

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Brazilian Football Confederation
CONMEBOL
Brazilian Football Confederation logo.svg
Founded1914;107 years ago (1914)
Headquarters Rio de Janeiro
FIFA affiliation1923 [1]
CONMEBOL affiliation1916
PresidentRogério Langanke Caboclo
Website cbf.com.br

The Brazilian Football Confederation (Portuguese : Confederação Brasileira de Futebol; CBF) is the governing body of football in Brazil. It was founded in 1914 as Federação Brasileira de Sports  [ pt ]), and renamed to Confederação Brasileira de Desportos in 1916. The football confederation, as known today, separated from other sports associations in September 1979. Between 1914 and 1979 it was the governing body, or at least the international reference,[ clarification needed ] for other olympic sports, such as tennis (until the foundation of CBT in 1955) , athletics (until 1977 when was founded CBAt), Swimming, Waterpolo, Handball (until 1979). It currently has the most wins on FIFA world cups, with a total of 5 wins.

Contents

The CBF has its headquarters in Rio de Janeiro. [2] The confederation owns a training center, named Granja Comary, located in Teresópolis. [3]

It was announced on 29 September 2007 that the CBF would launch a women's league and cup competition in October 2007 following pressure from FIFA president Sepp Blatter during the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup in China. [4] [5]

Association staff


NamePositionSource
Flag of Brazil.svg Rogério Langanke Caboclo President [6]
Flag of Brazil.svg Antônio Aquino Vice-president [7]
Flag of Brazil.svg Gustavo Feijo 2nd Vice-president [8]
Flag of Brazil.svg Fernando Sarney 3rd Vice-president [9]
Flag of Brazil.svg Castellar Guimaraes Neto 4th Vice-president [10]
Flag of Brazil.svg Francisco Novelletto Neto 5th Vice-president [11]
Flag of Brazil.svg Antônio Nunes 6th Vice-president [12]
Flag of Brazil.svg Ednaldo 7th Vice-president [13]
Flag of Brazil.svg Marcus Antônio Vincete 8th Vice-president [14]
Flag of Brazil.svg Walter Feldman General Secretary [15]
Flag of Brazil.svg Gilnei Botrel Tresurer [16]
Flag of Brazil.svg Andre Megale Technical Director [17]
Flag of Brazil.svg Tite Team Coach (Men's) [18]
Flag of Sweden.svg Pia Sundhage Team Coach (Women's) [19]
Flag of Brazil.svg Douglas Lunardi Media/Communications Manager [20]
Flag of Brazil.svg Marcos Madeira Futsal Coordinator [21]
Flag of Brazil.svg Sergio Correra Ds Silva Referee Coordinator [22]



See also

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References

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