Bread roll

Last updated
Roll
Bread rolls at a bakery.jpg
Bread rolls (lower bin) at a bakery
Type Bread
Course Side dish
Assortment of different German style bread rolls Korb mit Brotchen.JPG
Assortment of different German style bread rolls
Typical Austrian bread roll, called "Kaisersemmel" Kaisersemmel-.jpg
Typical Austrian bread roll, called "Kaisersemmel"

A roll is a small, usually round or oblong individual loaf of bread served as a meal accompaniment (eaten plain or with butter). [1] A roll can be served and eaten whole or cut transversely and dressed with filling between the two halves. Rolls are also commonly used to make sandwiches similar to those produced using slices of bread. They are found in most cuisines all over the world. In the Deipnosophistae , the author Athenaeus (c. 170 – c. 230) describes some of the bread, cakes, and pastries available in the Classical world. [2] Among the breads mentioned are griddle cakes, honey-and-oil bread, mushroom-shaped loaves covered in poppy seeds, and the military specialty of rolls baked on a spit.

Contents

Europe

Even in the same languages rolls are known by a variety of names.

Rolls are common in Europe, especially in Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic, Switzerland, Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Norway, Italy, Poland, Hungary, Ukraine, the United Kingdom and other countries with a thriving bread culture.

Other European languages have many local and dialectal terms for bread rolls. These include German language diminutives of Brot (bread) in most of western and central Germany (where they are called Brötchen) and in Switzerland (where they are called Brötli). Other German language terms include Rundstück ("round piece") in Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein; [3] Semmel in Austria and southern Bavaria; Weck in much of Baden-Württemberg, Franconia and Saarland; Schrippe in Berlin and parts of Brandenburg. Some of these names reappear in other European languages as well, for example as zsemle in Hungarian, or rundstykker ("round pieces") in Danish and Norwegian.

"Small bread" is also found as Italian panino , but which commonly denotes a very specific kind of Tramezzino sandwich bread. The Kaisersemmel reappears in Italy as the Michetta or Rosetta. In Swedish, a bread roll is a (frukost) bullar ("(breakfast) buns"), franskbrödbullar ("french bread bun") or simply fralla ("bun"), comfort food eaten with butter and any kind of topping (marmalade, cheese, ham, salami) for special weekend breakfasts. The Doppelweck or Doppelbrötchen is a type of bread roll originating from the Saarland which consists of two rolls joined together side-by-side before baking.

There are several names for them in the United Kingdom including bap, barm, batch, breadcake, bun, cob and teacake.

A variety of rolls are found in Europe, from white rolls made with wheat flour, to dark rolls containing mostly rye flour. Many variants include spices, such as coriander and cumin, or nuts. Also common are bread rolls containing or garnished with whole seeds such as sesame, poppy, pumpkin or sunflower.

Preparation

Below are the steps in the preparation of a Czech bread roll called "houska".

See also

Related Research Articles

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Bagel Ring-shaped bread product

A bagel, also historically spelled beigel, is a bread product originating in the Jewish communities of Poland. It is traditionally shaped by hand into the form of a ring from yeasted wheat dough, roughly hand-sized, that is first boiled for a short time in water and then baked. The result is a dense, chewy, doughy interior with a browned and sometimes crisp exterior. Bagels are often topped with seeds baked on the outer crust, with the traditional ones being poppy and sesame seeds. Some may have salt sprinkled on their surface, and there are different dough types, such as whole-grain and rye. Bagels are eaten toasted or untoasted.

Austrian cuisine culinary traditions of Austria

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Cinnamon roll sweet food pastry

Cinnamon roll is a sweet roll served commonly in Northern Europe and North America. In Sweden it is called kanelbulle, in Denmark it is known as kanelsnegl, in Norway it is known as Skillingsboller, Kanelbolle and Kanelsnurr, and in Finland it is known as korvapuusti .

Rusk hard, dry biscuit or a twice-baked bread

A rusk is a hard, dry biscuit or a twice-baked bread. It is sometimes used as a teether for babies. In some cultures, rusk is made of cake, rather than bread: this is sometimes referred to as cake rusk. In the UK, the name also refers to a wheat-based food additive.

Challah Jewish bread eaten during holidays

Challah is a special bread in Jewish cuisine, usually braided and typically eaten on ceremonial occasions such as Shabbat and major Jewish holidays. Ritually-acceptable challah is made of dough from which a small portion has been set aside as an offering.

Kaiser roll Hard Austrian roll

The Kaiser roll, also called a Vienna roll or a hard roll, is a typically crusty round bread roll, originally from Austria. It is made from white flour, yeast, malt, water and salt, with the top side usually divided in a symmetric pattern of five segments, separated by curved superficial cuts radiating from the centre outwards or folded in a series of overlapping lobes resembling a crown. The crisp Kaisersemmel is a traditional Austrian food officially approved by the Federal Ministry of Agriculture.

Kifli crescent-shaped bread roll, originating in Central Europe

Kifli or kipfel is a traditional yeast bread roll that is rolled and formed into a crescent before baking. Crescent-shaped pastries are considered to be the oldest-surviving pastry shape and are believed to represent an ancient pagan tradition involving offerings to the moon goddess Selene. Pastries of similar shape have been baked since at least the 10th century in monasteries. In Vienna kipfel dates to at least the 13th century and was likely traditionally baked in monasteries for Easter.

Czech cuisine culinary traditions of the Czech Republic

Czech cuisine has both influenced and been influenced by the cuisines of surrounding countries and nations. Many of the cakes and pastries that are popular in Central Europe originated within the Czech lands. Contemporary Czech cuisine is more meat-based than in previous periods; the current abundance of farmable meat has enriched its presence in regional cuisine. Traditionally, meat has been reserved for once-weekly consumption, typically on weekends. The body of Czech meals typically consists of two or more courses; the first course is traditionally soup, the second course is the main dish, and the third course can include supplementary courses, such as dessert or compote. In the Czech cuisine, thick soups and many kinds of sauces, both based on stewed or cooked vegetables and meats, often with cream, as well as baked meats with natural sauces (gravies), are popular dishes usually accompanied with beer, especially Pilsner, that Czechs consume the most in the world. Czech cuisine is also very strong in sweet main courses and desserts, a unique feature in European cuisines.

Teacake food

A teacake in England is generally a light yeast-based sweet bun containing dried fruit, typically served toasted and buttered. In the U.S. teacakes can be cookies or small cakes. In Sweden they are soft round flat wheat breads made with milk and a little sugar, and used to make sandwiches, with butter, and for example ham and/or cheese. In India and Australia a teacake is more like a butter cake. Tea refers to the popular beverage to which these baked goods are an accompaniment.

Kue Indonesian bite-sized snack or dessert

Kue is an Indonesian bite-sized snack or dessert food. Kue is a fairly broad term in Indonesian to describe a wide variety of snacks; cakes, cookies, fritters, pies, scones, and patisserie. Kue are made from a variety of ingredients in various forms, some are steamed, fried or baked. Kue are popular snacks in Indonesia, which has the largest variety of kue. Because of the countries' historical colonial ties, Koeé (kue) is also popular in the Netherlands.

Cozonac Sweet leavened bread, traditional to Romania and Bulgaria

Cozonac or Kozunak is a special sweet leavened bread, traditional to Romania, Bulgaria and Serbia. Rich in eggs, milk and butter, it is usually prepared for Easter in Bulgaria, and mostly for every major holiday in Romania and Moldova. The name comes from Greek: ϰοσωνάϰι kosōnáki, a diminutive form of ϰοσώνα kosṓna.

Poppy seed roll pastry

The poppy seed roll is a pastry consisting of a roll of sweet yeast bread with a dense, rich, bittersweet filling of poppy seed. An alternative filling is a paste of minced walnuts, or minced chestnuts.

References

  1. Stein, Sadie (April 13, 2015). "Ode to the Buttered Roll, That New York Lifeline". The New York Times. Retrieved November 30, 2017.
  2. Chrysippus of Tyana gives a list of thirty kinds, without commentary (Toussaint-Samat 2009, p. 202).
  3. www.abendblatt.de: Hamburger Rundstück (in German)