Brian Talboys

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Sir Brian Talboys

Brian Talboys.jpg
7th Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand
In office
12 December 1975 4 March 1981
Prime Minister Robert Muldoon
Preceded by Bob Tizard
Succeeded by Duncan MacIntyre
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for Wallace
In office
1957   1981
Preceded by Tom Macdonald
Succeeded by Derek Angus
Personal details
Born(1921-06-07)7 June 1921
Wanganui, New Zealand
Died3 June 2012(2012-06-03) (aged 90)
Invercargill, New Zealand
Political party National

Sir Brian Edward Talboys CH KCB AC PC (7 June 1921 – 3 June 2012) was a New Zealand politician who served as Deputy Prime Minister for the first two terms of Robert Muldoon's premiership. [1] [2] [3] If the abortive "Colonels' Coup" against Muldoon had been successful, Talboys would have become Prime Minister himself.

Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand

The Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand is the second-most senior minister in the Government of New Zealand, although this seniority does not necessarily translate into power. The office was created as a ministerial portfolio in 1954. The officeholder usually deputises for the prime minister at official functions. The current Deputy Prime Minister is Winston Peters, the Leader of New Zealand First.

Robert Muldoon 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand

Sir Robert David Muldoon, also known as Rob Muldoon, was a New Zealand politician who served as the 31st Prime Minister of New Zealand, from 1975 to 1984, while Leader of the National Party.

Prime Minister of New Zealand head of the New Zealand government

The Prime Minister of New Zealand is the head of government of New Zealand. The incumbent Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, leader of the New Zealand Labour Party, took office on 26 October 2017.

Contents

Early life

Talboys was born in Wanganui on 7 June 1921. He attended primary school in Wanganui and Wanganui Collegiate School, but then travelled to Canada to study at the University of Manitoba. He later returned to New Zealand and studied at Victoria University of Wellington, gaining a BA. For the next few years, he worked for a stock and station agents' company, and then gained a position as assistant editor of a farming newspaper. In World War II, Talboys served in the Royal New Zealand Air Force. After the war, Talboys settled in Southland as a farmer. [4]

Whanganui Place in Manawatu-Wanganui, New Zealand

Whanganui, also spelled Wanganui, is a city on the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand. The Whanganui River, New Zealand's longest navigable waterway, runs from Mount Tongariro to the sea. Whanganui is part of the Manawatu-Wanganui region.

The University of Manitoba is a public research university in Manitoba, Canada. Its main campus is located in the Fort Garry neighbourhood of southern Winnipeg with other campuses throughout the city. Founded in 1877, it is Western Canada's first university. The university maintains a reputation as a top research-intensive post-secondary educational institution and conducts more research annually than any other university in the region.

Victoria University of Wellington public university in New Zealand

Victoria University of Wellington is a university in Wellington, New Zealand. It was established in 1897 by Act of Parliament, and was a constituent college of the University of New Zealand.

Early political career

New Zealand Parliament
YearsTermElectorateParty
1957 1960 32nd Wallace National
1960 1963 33rd Wallace National
1963 1966 34th Wallace National
1966 1969 35th Wallace National
1969 1972 36th Wallace National
1972 1975 37th Wallace National
1975 1978 38th Wallace National
1978 1981 39th Wallace National

In the 1957 election, Talboys contested the Wallace electorate as the National Party candidate. He was successful, [2] defeating a Labour Party challenger to succeed retiring National MP Tom Macdonald. He held the Wallace electorate for his entire parliamentary career, usually gaining an outright majority. [5]

1957 New Zealand general election

The 1957 New Zealand general election was a nationwide vote to determine the shape of the New Zealand Parliament's 32nd term. It saw the governing National Party narrowly defeated by the Labour Party. The 1957 elections marked the beginning of the second Labour government, although this administration was to last only a single term.

Wallace was a New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It was established in 1858, the first election held in 1859, and existed until 1996. For a time, it was represented by two members. In total, there were 18 Members of Parliament from the Wallace electorate.

New Zealand National Party Major New Zealand political party

The New Zealand National Party, shortened to National or the Nats, is a centre-right political party in New Zealand. It is one of two major parties that dominate contemporary New Zealand politics, alongside its traditional rival, the New Zealand Labour Party.

In 1961 he was one of ten National MPs to vote with the Opposition and remove capital punishment for murder from the Crimes Bill that the Second National Government had introduced. In 1962, Talboys was elevated to Cabinet, becoming Minister of Agriculture. [6] At the end of 1963, he gained the additional role of Minister of Science. [6] In 1969, he dropped the agriculture portfolio, and became Minister of Education instead. [6] For most of 1972, he was Minister of Industries and Commerce, and Minister of Overseas Trade. [7] He was also briefly Minister of Trade and Industry towards the end of 1972, but National's loss of the 1972 election ended all his ministerial roles and put him into Opposition. [7]

Capital punishment in New Zealand first appeared in a codified form when New Zealand became a British colony in 1840, and it was first employed in 1842. Capital punishment was last used in 1957, abolished for murder in 1961, and abolished for all crimes, including treason, in 1989. During the period that it was in effect, 85 people were executed.

Second National Government of New Zealand

The Second National Government of New Zealand was the government of New Zealand from 1960 to 1972. It was a conservative government which sought mainly to preserve the economic prosperity and general stability of the early 1960s. It was one of New Zealand's longest-serving governments.

The Minister of Industries and Commerce in New Zealand is a former cabinet position appointed by the Prime Minister to be in charge of matters of industrial and commercial growth and trade. In 1972 it was merged with the Trade portfolio.

In 1974, Talboys was elected deputy leader of the National Party, and so when National won the 1975 election, Talboys became Deputy Prime Minister. He also became Minister of Foreign Affairs, [8] Minister of Overseas Trade, and Minister of National Development.

1975 New Zealand general election

The 1975 New Zealand general election was held on 29 November to elect MPs to the 38th session of the New Zealand Parliament. It was the first general election in New Zealand where 18- to 20-year-olds and all permanent residents of New Zealand were eligible to vote, although only citizens were able to be elected.

Minister of Foreign Affairs (New Zealand) Minister of Foreign Affairs for New Zealand

The Minister of Foreign Affairs is a senior member of the Government of New Zealand heading the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and responsible for relations with foreign countries.

Colonels' Coup

Talboys addressing the UN General Assembly, August 1980. Brian Talboys addressing the UN General Assembly, August 1980.jpg
Talboys addressing the UN General Assembly, August 1980.

In 1980, unhappiness was growing in the National Party about the leadership style of Robert Muldoon, who was seen as increasingly confrontational and dictatorial. This dissatisfaction culminated in the so-called "Colonels' Coup", an attempt by certain members of the party to depose Muldoon and install Talboys as leader instead. The dissidents were led by the three most prominent of Muldoon's younger ministers: Jim McLay, Jim Bolger, and Derek Quigley. A number of people were considered as possible replacements, including George Gair and the three "colonels" themselves, but it was eventually decided that Talboys was the only credible challenger - each of the others was deemed to be unacceptable to at least one faction of the party. Talboys had been performing well as Acting Prime Minister during Muldoon's absence overseas, and was seen (unlike Muldoon) to be likable and diplomatic.

Jim McLay New Zealand politician

Sir James Kenneth McLay is a New Zealand diplomat and former politician. He served as the Deputy Prime Minister from 15 March to 26 July 1984. McLay was also Leader of the National Party and Leader of the Opposition from 29 November 1984 to 26 March 1986. Following his ousting as party leader, he retired from parliamentary politics in 1987. In June 2009, he became New Zealand's Permanent Representative to the United Nations. In May 2015, McLay became New Zealand's Representative to the Palestinian Authority. From May 2016 to January 2017, he was New Zealand's Consul General in Honolulu.

Jim Bolger Prime Minister of New Zealand, politician

James Brendan Bolger is a New Zealand politician of the National Party who was the 35th Prime Minister of New Zealand, serving from 1990 to 1997.

Derek Quigley New Zealand politician

Derek Francis Quigley is a former New Zealand politician. He was a prominent member of the National Party during the late 1970s and early 1980s, and was known for his support of free market economics and trade liberalisation. Quigley left the National Party after clashing with its leadership, and later co-founded the ACT party.

The largest problem for the plotters was the reluctance of Talboys himself. Talboys, while not particularly supportive of Muldoon's leadership style, refused to actively campaign against his party's leader, and would only make a move if it could be shown beforehand that a majority of the party supported it. While Talboys was willing to accept a leadership change if his colleagues deemed it necessary, he was not willing to actually seek Muldoon's removal himself. Despite Talboys' reluctance, his backers managed to gain a slim majority in caucus in favour of a leadership change. When Muldoon returned to New Zealand, however, he quickly launched a counter-attack, and managed to tip the balance of caucus opinion back towards himself. When the possibility for a leadership vote arrived, Talboys refused to challenge, believing that an open dispute would do huge damage to the party as a whole. No vote was taken, and Talboys remained deputy leader.

Later life

Talboys retired from Parliament at the 1981 election, a year after the abortive leadership challenge. He went on to hold a number of positions in the business world, and served as the first chairman of the Pacific Democratic Union.

He was appointed Companion of Honour in 1981, [1] an Honorary Companion of the Order of Australia on 26 January 1982 for service to Australia/New Zealand relations, [9] and Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath in June 1991 for public services. [10]

He died in 2012 at the age of 90 at his rest home in Invercargill, just a few days short of his 91st birthday. [11] [12] He was survived by his wife and their two children. [12] Patricia, Lady Talboys, died in 2019. [13]

Notes

  1. 1 2 "No. 48604". The London Gazette . 8 May 1981. p. 1.
  2. 1 2 James, Colin (11 September 2005). "New blood needed to hold on to power". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 29 January 2010.
  3. Alex Fensome. "Sir Brian Talboys | Former NZ Deputy PM Dies". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 2012-06-03.
  4. Gustafson 1986, p. 346.
  5. Wilson 1985, p. 238.
  6. 1 2 3 Wilson 1985, p. 90.
  7. 1 2 Wilson 1985, p. 91.
  8. Pepperell, Susan (5 April 2009). "Brotherly love: Rob Hamill wants justice for brother killed by Khmer Rouge". Sunday Star Times. Retrieved 29 January 2010.
  9. "TALBOYS, Brian Edward". It's an Honour. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Retrieved 29 January 2010.
  10. "No. 47109". The London Gazette . 14 June 1991. p. 1.
  11. "Former Deputy PM Sir Brian Talboys Dies". New Zealand Herald. 4 June 2012. Retrieved 4 June 2012.
  12. 1 2 "Ex-deputy PM Talboys dies". The Press . 4 June 2012. p. A2.
  13. "Lady Talboys death notice". New Zealand Herald. 10 April 2019. Retrieved 11 April 2019.

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References

New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by
Tom Macdonald
Member of Parliament for Wallace
19571981
Succeeded by
Derek Angus
Political offices
Preceded by
Arthur Kinsella
Minister of Education
1969–1972
Succeeded by
Herbert Pickering
Preceded by
Bob Tizard
Deputy Prime Minister of New Zealand
1975–1981
Succeeded by
Duncan MacIntyre