British GAA

Last updated

Britain GAA
Irish:Breataine
Major grounds: Páirc na hÉireann [1]
Catherine De Barnes Lane
Bickenhill
West Midlands
United Kingdom
B92 0DB

Emerald GAA Grounds
West End Road
South Ruislip
HA4 6QX
Middlesex
Standard kit
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Regular kit

The British Council of the Gaelic Athletic Association (Irish : Cumann Lúthchleas Gael na Breataine) [2] or Britain GAA is the only provincial council of the Gaelic Athletic Association outside Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in Great Britain. The board is also responsible for the British Gaelic football, hurling, camogie and ladies' Gaelic football inter-county teams.

Contents

London compete in the National Hurling League in hurling, and in the All-Ireland Senior Football Championship (as part of Connacht) and National Football League in Gaelic football. Since the reorganisation of the hurling championships into 3 tiers, London now play in the tier 2 Christy Ring Cup while Warwickshire and Lancashire play in the tier 4 Lory Meagher Cup.

The British Council is responsible for the seven GAA counties of Britain: Gloucestershire, Hertfordshire, Lancashire, London, Scotland, Warwickshire and Yorkshire. The GAA counties cover wider areas than their names suggest; the Hertfordshire County Board, for example, oversees clubs in Hertfordshire, Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Oxfordshire; Gloucestershire GAA reaches into South Wales, Warwickshire GAA includes Staffordshire and Birmingham, and so on. The most popular sport is Gaelic football and some clubs are dedicated only to that sport.

History

The history of the London branch of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) dates back to the 19th century. Sam Maguire started his career here.

The old Wembley Stadium has played host to a number of Gaelic football and hurling games, the first taking place in 1958.

Facilities

Many British GAA games are played on council fields, there are some dedicated GAA grounds in Britain. The two main grounds are the Emerald GAA Grounds, in Ruislip, London, and Páirc na hÉireann, in Solihull, near Birmingham.

All Britain Junior Football Club Championship

YearWinnersScoreRunners-UpScoreVenue
2019Thomas McCurtains1-11Glasgow Gaels0-7Beeston Rd, Leeds
2018Dunedin Connollys3-12Neasden Gaels2-12
2017Dunedin Connollys1-17Sean McDermotts1-12
2016Dunedin Connollys1-19John Mitchels (Liverpool)2-14 (AET)
2015John Mitchels (Liverpool)2-08Sean McDermotts0-08
2014John Mitchels (Liverpool)4-12North London Shamrocks3-11
2013John Mitchels (Liverpool)2-15Dunedin Connollys1-11
2012Stx. Peters, Manchester2-17St. Colmcille's, Cardiff1-03
2011Cuchullains (York)1-6John Mitchel’s (Liverpool)0-6
2010St Peters (Lan)3-12Sean McDermotts2-4
2009Dunedin ConnollysJohn Mitchel’s (Liverpool)
2008John Mitchel’s (Liverpool)1-9Tara1-4
2007John Mitchel’s (Liverpool)2-10Thomas McCurtains (Lon)0-7
2006Fulham Irish (Lon)1-11Oisins (Lan)0-11
2005Harlesden Harps (Lon)1-11Dunedin Connollys (Scot0-11Old Bedians
2004
2003Sean McDermotts
2002Sean McDermotts
2001
2000Sean McDermotts
1999Hugh O'Neills1–11Sean McDermotts0–04
1998
1997Southern Gaels, Bournemouth
1996
1995Sean McDermotts
1994Oisins
1993
1992
1991
1990
1989Kingdom (London)1–12St. Vincent's, Luton0–04
1988John Mitchel's (Warks)
1987
1986
1985
1984
1983
1982Hugh O'Neills1–06Parnells, London0–08
1981
1980Tara1–08Hugh O'Neills2–02

Note: this championship does not include London's senior champions since 2002 [3]

All Britain Junior Football County Championship

YearWinnersScoreRunners-UpScoreVenue
2020
2019Scotland3–12Warwickshire3–11Pairc na h'Eireann
2018Kilkenny6–12Warwickshire0–09Pairc na h'Eireann
2017Kilkenny3–15Warwickshire1–06Pairc na h'Eireann
2016Lancashire1–10London2–06
2015Kilkenny2-7Scotland0-8Edinburgh
2014Scotland3–10Warwickshire2–07Pairc na h'Eireann
2013Lancashire2-12Hertfordshire1-11
2012Lancashire2–10London0–10
2011Lancashire1–11Warwickshire0–04
2010Lancashire0-16London1-6
2009London2-6Lancashire0-10
2008Gloucestershire1-12Warwickshire0-6
2007London0-11Lancashire0-9
2006WarwickshireScotlandPairc na h'Eireann
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000

Related Research Articles

Gaelic Athletic Association Irish amateur sporting and cultural organisation

The Gaelic Athletic Association is an Irish international amateur sporting and cultural organisation, focused primarily on promoting indigenous Gaelic games and pastimes, which include the traditional Irish sports of hurling, camogie, Gaelic football, Gaelic handball and rounders. The association also promotes Irish music and dance, as well as the Irish language.

All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship

The GAA Hurling All-Ireland Senior Championship, known simply as the All-Ireland Championship, is an annual inter-county hurling competition organised by the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA). It is the highest inter-county hurling competition in Ireland, and has been contested every year except one since 1887.

McGovern Park

McGovern Park is the current headquarters, and principal Gaelic games facility, of the London GAA. It is situated in South Ruislip, west London and the facilities are managed by Veritable Venue Management.

Warwickshire GAA

The Warwickshire County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) is one of the county boards outside Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in Warwickshire. The county board is also responsible for the Warwickshire county teams. Warwickshire have won the Lory Meagher Cup two times. The first victory was in 2013 beating Longford in the hurling final on 8 June 2013 at Croke Park, 2-16 to 0-10. The second in 2017 beating Leitrim on the 10 June 2017 at Croke Park, 0-17 to 0-11. Warwickshire again beat Longford to win the Allianz NHL Div 3B hurling final on 4 April 2015 in Ratoath, Meath. Final score: Warwickshire 1-15, Longford 2-10.

The Canadian GAA is responsible for Gaelic games across Canada, overseeing approximately 20 clubs. It has the same status as one of the county boards of Ireland and is one of over thirty regional GAA executive boards throughout the world. The board is responsible for Gaelic football, hurling, camogie and ladies' Gaelic football teams in Canada. The GAA sends a Canadian team to the GAA World Championships.

Fullen Gaels

Fullen Gaels Hurling and Camogie Club is a Gaelic Athletic Association club based in Manchester, England. Although affiliated to Lancashire GAA it mainly competes in Warwickshire GAA competitions.

Hertfordshire GAA

The Hertfordshire County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Hertfordshire GAA is one of the county boards outside Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in Hertfordshire. The county board is also responsible for the Hertfordshire county teams.

Scotland GAA

The Scotland Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Scotland GAA is one of the county boards of the GAA outside Ireland, and is responsible for Gaelic games in Scotland. The county board is also responsible for the Scottish county teams. The Board participates with London, Gloucestershire, Hertfordshire, Lancashire, Warwickshire, and Yorkshire under the British GAA.

A county is a geographic region within Gaelic games, controlled by a county board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) and originally based on the 32 counties of Ireland as they were in 1884. While the administrative geography of Ireland has since changed, with several new counties created and the six that make up Northern Ireland superseded by 11 local government districts, the counties in Gaelic games have remained largely unchanged.

A province is a geographic region within Gaelic games, consisting of several counties of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) and originally based on the historic four provinces of Ireland as they were set in 1610.

Lancashire GAA

The Lancashire County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA), or Lancashire GAA, is one of the county boards outside Ireland and is responsible for the running of Gaelic games in the North West of England and on the Isle of Man. With Scotland, Warwickshire, Gloucestershire, Hertfordshire, London and Yorkshire, the board makes up the British Provincial Board. The Lancashire board oversees the Lancashire Junior Championship, the Lancashire Junior League, and the first and second division of the Pennine League.

The following is an alphabetical list of terms and jargon used in relation to Gaelic games. See also list of Irish county nicknames

Páirc na hÉireann

Páirc na hÉireann, near Bickenhill, Solihull, England, is the principal Gaelic games sports facility in the West Midlands. It is administered by the Warwickshire GAA. Páirc na hÉireann is located east of Birmingham near Birmingham International Airport. It is currently the home grounds of Britain GAA.

Gloucestershire GAA

The Gloucestershire County Board of the Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) or Gloucester GAA, is one of the county boards outside Ireland and is responsible for the running of Gaelic Games in the South West of England and South Wales. With Scotland, Warwickshire, Lancashire, Hertfordshire, London and Yorkshire, the board makes up the British Provincial Board.

John Mitchel's Hurling and Camogie Club is a Gaelic Athletic Association club based in Birmingham, England, and is the oldest club in the Warwickshire GAA. It has been long one of the leading Warwickshire clubs in hurling, competing in the county Senior Championship, and in camogie, competing at Junior level. There is an associated Gaelic football club. The club is named after John Mitchel, the 19th-century Irish revolutionary.

All Saints Gaelic Athletic Club is the only Gaelic Athletic Association club in the town of Ballymena, County Antrim. The club is a member of the South-West Antrim division of Antrim GAA, and competes in Gaelic football, hurling, Ladies Gaelic football and camogie.

Castleknock GAA

Castleknock Hurling and Football Club is a Dublin GAA club centered on the townlands of Carpenterstown and Diswellstown in the civil parish of Castleknock in Fingal, Ireland. It serves large parts of the suburban areas of Castleknock, Hartstown, Coolmine, Blanchardstown, Laurel Lodge and Clonsilla. The club plays the following Gaelic games at all age levels from nursery to adult: Hurling, Gaelic football, Camogie and Ladies' Gaelic football.

Inter-county, or inter county is Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) terminology which refers to competitions or matches between counties, as used in Gaelic games. The term can also be used to describe the players on the teams.

St. Barnabas Gaelic Athletic Club are a Nottingham club. It is Nottingham's sole provider of Gaelic sports. It was founded in 1947, initially to provide a social outlet for Irish immigrants who had moved to Nottingham. It also attracts members from the surrounding region including Chesterfield, Lincoln, Newark and Loughborough. The club is affiliated to and enters into competitions organised by Warwickshire GAA. This region today covers both the West and East Midlands of England, with its headquarters at Páirc na hÉireann, Bickenhill, Solihull.

References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 14 September 2009. Retrieved 4 October 2009.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. "CLG na Breataine - súil siar agus ar aghaidh". Beo!. 2010. Retrieved 28 May 2012.
  3. "The All-Britain junior title race is on". 16 October 2019.