Broad Strokes

Last updated
Broad Strokes
Roswell Rudd Broad Strokes.jpg
Studio album by
Released2000
RecordedMarch 1999–January 2000
Genre Jazz
Length1:07:22
Label Knitting Factory Works
KFW-276
Producer Verna Gillis
Roswell Rudd chronology
Monk's Dream
(2000)
Broad Strokes
(2000)
Eventuality: The Charlie Kohlhase Quintet Plays the Music of Roswell Rudd
(2000)

Broad Strokes is an album by trombonist Roswell Rudd. It was recorded during March 1999–January 2000 at various locations, and was released by Knitting Factory Works in 2000. On the album, Rudd appears in a broad range of ensemble contexts, with varying personnel. [1] [2]

Contents

Reception

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [2]
The Penguin Guide to Jazz Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [3]

In a review for AllMusic, Steve Loewy wrote: "Rudd fans will not wish to pass this recording up, although it is much more an oddity than anything definitive or enduring." [2]

A reviewer for All About Jazz stated: "Overall, this record is for Roswell Rudd fanatics only. If you're new to Rudd, you should check out a record like New York Eye and Ear Control and dig for the roots—instead of listening to a disc that demands frequent use of the fast forward button." [4]

David Dupont of One Final Note called the album "the album that would serve as an official proclamation of [Rudd's] return," and commented: "This is certainly not a set of sedate renderings of sentimental tunes. Rather it is a sprawling, messy recital grounded in Rudd's life... for all its sense of clutter, Broad Strokes remains an enduring, engaging addition to Rudd's discography." [5]

Tom Hull called the album "a mishmash," and remarked: "Eclectic, it sez here. Big groups, small groups, too many vocals... some great trombone." [6]

Track listing

  1. "Change of Season" (Herbie Nichols) – 7:09
  2. "Sassy & Dolphy" (Roswell Rudd) – 6:19
  3. "Almost Blue" (Elvis Costello) – 6:19
  4. "Stokey" (Roswell Rudd) – 5:52
  5. "Coming on the Hudson" (Thelonious Monk) – 8:47
  6. "God Had a Girlfriend" (Roswell Rudd) – 6:35
  7. "All Too Soon / Way Low" (Duke Ellington) – 8:50
  8. "Theme from Babe" (Camille Saint-Saëns) – 5:20
  9. "The Light" (Roswell Rudd) – 10:43
  10. "Change of Season" (Herbie Nichols) – 1:28

Personnel

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References

  1. "Roswell Rudd: Broad Strokes". Jazz Music Archives. Retrieved September 19, 2022.
  2. 1 2 3 Loewy, Steve. "Roswell Rudd: Broad Strokes". AllMusic. Retrieved September 19, 2022.
  3. Cook, Richard; Morton, Brian (2008). The Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings. Penguin Books. p. 1247.
  4. Staff, AAJ (August 1, 2000). "Roswell Rudd: Broad Strokes". [All About Jazz. Retrieved September 2, 2022.
  5. Dupont, David (April 2004). "Roswell Rudd : Rudd Revival (Part 2)". One Final Note. Retrieved September 19, 2022.
  6. Hull, Tom. "The Incredible Honk". Tom Hull – on the Web. Retrieved September 19, 2022.