Brown Peninsula

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Brown Peninsula ( 78°6′S165°25′E / 78.100°S 165.417°E / -78.100; 165.417 Coordinates: 78°6′S165°25′E / 78.100°S 165.417°E / -78.100; 165.417 ) is a nearly ice-free peninsula, 10 nautical miles (19 km) long and 4 nautical miles (7 km) wide, which rises above the Ross Ice Shelf northward of Mount Discovery, to which it is connected by a low isthmus. It was discovered by the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04, which named it "Brown Island" because of its color and its island-like character. Since it is a peninsula, the name has been altered accordingly. [1]

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References

  1. "Brown Peninsula". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2011-09-20.

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Brown Peninsula".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )