Bryan Langley

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Bryan Langley
Born29 December 1909
Fulham, London, England
Died21 January 2008 (2008-01-22) (aged 98)
United Kingdom
Occupation Cinematographer
Years active1929–1960

Bryan Langley (29 December 1909 – 21 January 2008) was a British cinematographer. Langley worked for a number of years with the British International Pictures organisation, but later worked at other studios including Gainsborough Pictures and Ealing. He was the son of opera singer and actor Herbert Langley. [1]

Contents

Selected filmography

Bibliography

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References

  1. "BFI Screenonline: Langley, Bryan (1909-2008) Biography". www.screenonline.org.uk.