Buckinghamshire

Last updated

Notable celebrities living in Buckinghamshire include:

See also

Notes

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  23. Office for National Statistics Archived 25 May 2006 at the Wayback Machine (pp.240–253)
  24. Components may not sum to totals due to rounding
  25. includes hunting and forestry
  26. includes energy and construction
  27. includes financial intermediation services indirectly measured
  28. UK average index base = 100
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  71. "James Corden sparks social media frenzy after tweeting about High Wycombe". Bucks Free Press.
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Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Amersham</span> Human settlement in England

Amersham is a market town and civil parish within the unitary authority of Buckinghamshire, England, in the Chiltern Hills, 27 miles (43 km) northwest of central London, 15 miles (24 km) from Aylesbury and 9 miles (14 km) from High Wycombe. Amersham is part of the London commuter belt.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Chesham</span> Human settlement in England

Chesham is a market town and civil parish in Buckinghamshire, England. It is 11 miles (18 km) south-east of the county town of Aylesbury and 25.8 miles (41.5 km) north-west of Charing Cross, central London, and is part of the London commuter belt. It is in the Chess Valley and surrounded by farmland. The earliest records of Chesham as a settlement are from the second half of the 10th century, although there is archaeological evidence of people in this area from around 8000 BC. Henry III granted the town a royal charter for a weekly market in 1257.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Chiltern District</span> Non-metropolitan district in England

Chiltern District was one of four local government districts of Buckinghamshire in south central England from 1974 to 2020. It was named after the Chiltern Hills on which the region sits.

Amersham Rural District

Amersham Rural District was a rural district in the administrative county of Buckinghamshire, England from 1894 to 1974, covering an area in the south-east of the county.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Aylesbury (UK Parliament constituency)</span> Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885 onwards

Aylesbury is a constituency created in 1553 — created as a single-member seat in 1885 — represented in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom since 2019 by Rob Butler of the Conservative Party.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Wycombe (UK Parliament constituency)</span> Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1868 onwards

Wycombe is a constituency in Buckinghamshire represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Steve Baker, a Conservative.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Chesham and Amersham (UK Parliament constituency)</span> Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1974 onwards

Chesham and Amersham is a parliamentary constituency located in the ceremonial county of Buckinghamshire in South East England. It is represented in the House of Commons by Sarah Green, a Liberal Democrat, who was elected in a by-election in June 2021.

Aylesbury railway station Railway station in Buckinghamshire, England

Aylesbury railway station is a railway station in Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire, England, on the London–Aylesbury line from London Marylebone via Amersham. It is 38 miles (61 km) from Aylesbury to Marylebone. A branch line from Princes Risborough on the Chiltern Main Line terminates at the station. It was the terminus for London Underground's Metropolitan line until the service was cut back to Amersham in 1961. The station was also known as Aylesbury Town under the management of British Railways from c. 1948 until the 1960s.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">London–Aylesbury line</span>

The London–Aylesbury line is a railway line between London Marylebone and Aylesbury, going via the Chiltern Hills; passenger trains are operated by Chiltern Railways. Nearly half of the line is owned by London Underground, approximately 16 miles (26 km) – the total length of the passenger line is about 39 miles (63 km) with a freight continuation.

<i>Bucks Free Press</i> Weekly newspaper covering High Wycombe

The Bucks Free Press is a weekly local newspaper, published every Friday and covering the area surrounding High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England. It was first published on 19 December 1856.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Transport in Buckinghamshire</span>

Transport in Buckinghamshire has been shaped by its position within the United Kingdom. Most routes between the UK's two largest cities, London and Birmingham, pass through this county. The county's growing industry first brought canals to the area, then railways and then motorways.

Counties 1 Southern North is a division at level 7 of the English rugby union system. When league rugby first began in 1987 it was a single league known as Southern Counties but since 1996 the division was split into two regional leagues - Southern Counties North and Southern Counties South. Counties 1 Southern North currently sits at the seventh tier of club rugby union in England and primarily featuring teams based in Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Carousel Buses</span> Buckinghamshire bus operator

Carousel Buses is a bus company based in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England. Originally an independent company, it is a subsidiary of the Go-Ahead Group. It is grouped together with Oxford Bus Company and Thames Travel, both of Oxfordshire, with the fleets of each operator regularly interchanged.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Fred Pooley</span> British architect

Fred Bernard Pooley CBE is best known as the county architect of Buckinghamshire, and his futuristic monorail proposals for a new town in north Bucks that eventually became Milton Keynes. Pooley was born in West Ham, east London and trained at the Northern Polytechnic in the evenings, while working in the West Ham engineer's department by day. He qualified as an architect, planner and surveyor before serving with the Royal Engineers during World War II. He also qualified as a structural engineer and arbitrator.

The Buckinghamshire Rugby Football Union is the governing body for the sport of rugby union in the county of Buckinghamshire in England. The union is the constituent body of the Rugby Football Union (RFU) for Buckinghamshire, and administers and organises rugby union clubs and competitions in the county. It also administers the Buckinghamshire county rugby representative teams. The union was founded at a meeting at High Wycombe on 16 July 1949 during a drinking session at one of the founders house.

2021 Buckinghamshire Council election 2021 election of councillors to Buckinghamshire Council

The 2021 Buckinghamshire Council election took place on 6 May 2021, alongside nationwide local elections. The election was originally due to take place in May 2020, but was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

References

Buckinghamshire
Motto(s): 
Vestigia nulla retrorsum
("No turning back / We do not retreat")
Buckinghamshire UK locator map 2010.svg
Coordinates: 51°50′N0°50′W / 51.833°N 0.833°W / 51.833; -0.833 Coordinates: 51°50′N0°50′W / 51.833°N 0.833°W / 51.833; -0.833
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country England
Region South East
Established Ancient
Time zone UTC±00:00 (Greenwich Mean Time)
  Summer (DST) UTC+01:00 (British Summer Time)
Members of Parliament 7 MPs
Police Thames Valley Police
Ceremonial county
Lord Lieutenant The Countess Howe DL
from 26 June 2020
High Sheriff George Rupert Anson [1] (2021–22)
Area1,874 km2 (724 sq mi)
  Ranked 32nd of 48
Population (mid-2019 est.)808,666
  Ranked 30th of 48
Density432/km2 (1,120/sq mi)
Ethnicity91.7% White
4.3% S. Asian
1.6% Black[ citation needed ]