Buckley-class destroyer escort

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USS Buckley (DE-51) underway in the Atlantic Ocean on 10 June 1944 (80-G-236608).jpg
USS Buckley (DE-51)
Class overview
Name:Buckley class
Operators:
Preceded by: Evartsclass
Succeeded by: Cannonclass
Planned: 154
Completed: 148
General characteristics
Type: Destroyer escort
Displacement: 1,740 tons (fully loaded)
Length: 306 ft (93.3 m)
Beam: 36 ft 6 in (11.1 m)
Draft: 11 ft (3.4 m) (fully loaded)
Propulsion: Two Foster-Wheeler Express "D"-type water-tube boilers, two GE steam turbines of 13,500 horsepower (10,100 kW) total, two generators (9,200 kilowatts (12,300 hp) total), 12,000 horsepower (8,900 kW) of electric motors drove the two propeller shafts
Speed: 24 knots (44 km/h; 28 mph) (most ships could attain 26/27 knots)
Range: 5,500 nautical miles (10,190 km) at 15 knots (28 km/h)
Capacity: 350 tons oil (fuel)
Sensors and
processing systems:
  • Radar: Type SL surface search fixed to mast above yard arm and type SA air search only fitted to certain ships
  • Sonar: Type 128D or Type 144 both in retractable dome.
  • Direction Finding: MF direction finding antenna fitted in front of the bridge and HF/DF Type FH 4 antenna fitted on top of mast
Armament:

The Buckley-class destroyer escorts were 102 destroyer escorts launched in the United States in 1943–44. They served in World War II as convoy escorts and anti-submarine warfare ships. The lead ship was USS Buckley which was launched on 9 January 1943. The ships had General Electric steam turbo-electric transmission. The ships were prefabricated at various factories in the United States, and the units brought together in the shipyards, where they were welded together on the slipways.

Contents

The Buckley class was the second class of destroyer escort, succeeding the Evarts-class destroyer escorts. One of the main design differences was that the hull was significantly lengthened on the Buckley class; this long-hull design proved so successful that it was used for all further destroyer escort classes. The class was also known as the TE type, from Turbo Electric drive. The TE was replaced with a diesel-electric plant to yield the design of the successor Cannonclass ("DET"). [1] [2]

A total of 154 were ordered with 6 being completed as high speed transport ("APD"). A further 37 were later converted after completion while 46 of the Buckleys were delivered to the Royal Navy under the Lend-Lease agreement. These 46 were classed as frigates and named after Royal Navy captains of the Napoleonic Wars, forming part of the Captain-class frigate along with 32 Lend-Lease ships of the Evarts class.

After World War II, most of the surviving units of this class were transferred to Taiwan, South Korea, Chile, Mexico and other countries. The rest were retained by the US Navy's reserve fleet until they were decommissioned.

Armament

The Buckley-class' main armament was three 3"/50 caliber guns in Mk 22 dual purpose open mounts. They fired fixed fire shot (anti-aircraft, armor-piercing, or star shell) and had a range of 14,600 yards (13,400 m) at 45 degrees, and an anti-aircraft ceiling of 28,000 feet (8,500 m)

With regard to anti-aircraft weaponry, the Buckley-class carried four 1.1 inch/75 (28mm) gun or two Bofors 40 mm guns fitted in the 'X' position. These were not included in the Captain-Class units. Eight Oerlikon 20 mm cannons were positioned two in front of the bridge behind and above B gun mount, one on each side of the B gun mount in sponsons, and two on each side of the ship in sponsons just abaft the funnel. Some of the ships had an extra one or two Oerlikons fitted on top of the superstructure amidships. The Captain-Class units had additional 20 mm guns fitted in 'X' position, and on the director stand for 'X' position.

For anti-submarine weapons, the Buckley-class carried a Hedgehog—a British designed ahead throwing mortar which fired 24 bombs ahead of the ship, situated on the main deck just aft of A gun mount. They also had up to 200 depth charges. Two sets of double rails were mounted on each side of the ship at the stern, each set held 24 charges; eight (two on Captain-class units) K-gun depth charge throwers each holding 5 charges were on each side of the ship just forward of the stern rails. On Captain-class ships, just forward of these double sets of ready racks were fitted along each side of the ship extending to midships, each set holding 60 depth charges (these ready rails were added after the ships first arrived in the UK).

They also carried three 21-inch (533 mm) torpedo tubes in a triple mount mounted just aft of the stack.

Film appearance

Most of the film The Enemy Below (1957) was filmed on USS Whitehurst, a Buckley-class DE. The rest of the film is set in the submarine that it is hunting.

Ships in Class

Ship NameHull No.BuilderLaid downLaunchedCommissionedDecommissionedFate
Buckley DE-51 Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Bethlehem Hingham Shipyard, Hingham, Massachusetts 21 July 19429 January 194330 April 19433 July 1946Reclassified DER-51 26 April 1949, reclassified DE-51 29 September 1954. Struck from Navy List 1 June 1968; sold for scrap July 1969
Charles Lawrence DE-531 August 194216 February 194331 May 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-37 23 October 1944
Daniel T. Griffin DE-547 September 194225 February 19439 June 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-38 23 October 1944
Donnell DE-5627 November 194213 March 194326 June 194323 October 1945Torpedoed by U-473 in North Atlantic 3 May 1944; reclassified IX-182 15 July 1944; served as a floating power plant at Cherbourg, France. Struck from the Navy List 10 November 1945; sold 29 April 1946
Fogg DE-574 December 194220 March 19437 July 194327 October 1947Reclassified DER-57 18 March 1949, reclassified DE-57 28 October 1954. Struck from Navy List 1 April 1965; sold for scrap 4 January 1966
Foss DE-5931 December 194210 April 194323 July 194330 October 1957Struck from Navy List 1 November 1965 and sold for scrap
Gantner DE-6031 December 194217 April 194329 July 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-42 23 February 1945
George W. Ingram DE-626 February 19438 May 194311 August 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-43 23 February 1945
Ira Jeffery (ex-Jeffery) DE-6313 February 194315 May 194315 August 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-44 23 February 1945
Lee Fox DE-651 March 194329 May 194330 August 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-45 31 July 1944
Amesbury DE-668 March 19436 June 194331 August 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-46 31 July 1944
Bates DE-6829 March 19436 June 194312 September 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-47 31 July 1944; sunk by kamikazes and bombs off Okinawa 25 May 1945
Blessman DE-6922 March 194319 June 194319 September 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-48 31 July 1944
Joseph E. Campbell (ex-Campbell) DE-7029 March 194326 June 194323 September 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-49 24 November 1944
Reuben James DE-153 Norfolk Navy Yard 7 September 19426 February 19431 April 194311 October 1947Struck from Navy List 30 June 1968, sunk as a target 1 March 1971
Sims DE-1547 September 19426 February 194324 April 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-50 25 September 1944
Hopping DE-15515 December 194210 March 194321 May 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-51 25 September 1944
Reeves DE-1567 February 194322 April 19439 May 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-52 25 September 1944
Fechteler DE-1577 February 194322 April 19431 July 1943N/ATorpedoed and sunk by U-967 northwest of Oran, Algeria 5 May 1944
Chase DE-15816 March 194324 April 194318 July 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-54 28 November 1944
Laning DE-15823 April 19434 July 19431 August 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-55 28 November 1944
Loy DE-16023 April 19434 July 194312 September 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-56 23 October 1944
Barber DE-16127 April 194320 May 194310 October 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-57 23 October 1944
Lovelace DE-19822 May 19434 July 19437 November 194322 May 1946Sunk as target off California, 25 April 1968
Manning DE-199 Charleston Navy Yard 15 February 19431 June 19431 October 194315 January 1947Struck from Navy List 31 July 1968; sold for scrap 27 October 1969
Neuendorf DE-20015 February 19431 June 194318 October 194314 May 1946Struck from Navy List 1 July 1967
James E. Craig DE-20115 April 194322 July 19431 November 19432 July 1946Struck from Navy List 30 July 1968; sunk as target off California February 1969
Eichenberger DE-20215 April 194322 July 194317 November 194314 May 1946Struck from Navy List 1 December 1972; sold for scrap 1 November 1973
Thomason DE-2035 June 194323 August 194310 December 194322 May 1946Struck from Navy List 30 June 1968; sold for scrap 30 June 1969
Jordan DE-2045 June 194323 August 194317 December 194319 December 1945Struck from Navy List 8 January 1946; sold for scrap 10 July 1947
Newman DE-2058 June 19439 August 194326 November 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-59 5 July 1944
Liddle DE-20612 June 19439 August 19436 December 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-60 5 July 1944
Kephart DE-20712 May 19436 September 19437 January 1944N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-61 5 July 1944
Cofer DE-20812 May 19436 September 194319 January 1944N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-62 5 July 1944
Lloyd DE-20926 July 194323 October 194311 February 1944N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-63 5 July 1944
Otter DE-21026 July 194323 October 194321 February 1944January 1947Sunk as target off Puerto Rico 10 July 1970
Hubbard DE-21111 August 194311 November 19436 March 1944N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-53 1 June 1945
Hayter DE-21211 August 194311 November 194316 March 1944N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-80 1 June 1945
William T. Powell DE-21326 August 194327 November 194328 March 19449 December 1949Reclassified DER-213 18 March 1949, reclassified DE-213 1 December 1954. Struck from Navy List 1 November 1965, sold for scrap 3 October 1966
28 November 195017 January 1958
Scott DE-214 Philadelphia Navy Yard 1 January 19433 April 194320 July 19433 March 1947Conversion to High Speed Transport and reclassification as APD-64 canceled 10 September 1945. Struck from Navy List 1 July 1965, sold for scrap 20 January 1967
Burke DE-2151 January 19433 April 194320 August 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-65 24 January 1945
Enright DE-21622 February 194329 May 194321 September 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-66 24 January 1945
Coolbaugh DE-21722 February 194329 May 194315 October 194321 February 1960Struck from Navy List 1 July 1972, sold for scrap 17 August 1973
Darby DE-21822 February 194329 May 194315 November 194328 April 1947Struck from Navy List 23 September 1968, sunk as a target 24 May 1970
24 October 195023 September 1968
J. Douglas Blackwood DE-21922 February 194329 May 194315 December 194320 April 1946Struck from Navy List 30 January 1970, sunk as a target 20 July 1970
5 February 195130 January 1970
Francis M. Robinson DE-22022 February 194329 May 194315 January 194420 June 1960Struck from Navy List 1 July 1972, sold for scrap 12 July 1973
Solar DE-22122 February 194329 May 194315 February 194421 May 1946Destroyed by ammunition explosion at Earle, New Jersey 30 April 1946. Hulk sunk at sea 9 June 1946
Fowler DE-2225 April 19433 July 194315 March 194428 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 July 1965, sold for scrap 29 December 1966
Spangenberg DE-2235 April 19433 July 194315 April 194318 July 1947Reclassified DER-223 in March 1949, reclassified DE-223 1 December 1954. Struck from Navy List 1 November 1965, sold for scrap 3 October 1966
Ahrens DE-575 Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Bethlehem Hingham Shipyard, Hingham, Massachusetts 5 November 194321 December 194312 February 194424 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 April 1965, sold for scrap 20 January 1967
Barr DE-5765 November 194328 December 194316 February 1944N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-39 31 July 1944
Alexander J. Luke DE-5775 November 194328 December 194319 February 194418 October 1947Reclassified DER-577 7 December 1945, reclassified DE-577 in August 1954. Struck from Navy List 1 May 1970, sunk as a target 22 October 1970
Robert I. Paine DE-5785 November 194330 December 194326 February 194421 November 1947Reclassified DER-578 18 March 1949, reclassified DE-578 1 December 1954. Struck from Navy List 1 June 1968, sold for scrap 18 July 1969
Foreman DE-633 Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, San Francisco 9 March 19431 August 194322 October 194328 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 April 1965, sold for scrap 1966
Whitehurst DE-63421 March 19435 September 194319 November 194327 November 1946Struck from Navy List 12 July 1969, sunk as target by Trigger (SS-564) 28 April 1971
1 September 19506 December 1958
2 October 19611 August 1962
England DE-6354 April 194326 September 194310 December 194315 October 1945Reclassified APD-41 in mid-1945 but conversion to High Speed Transport was canceled 10 September 1945. Struck from Navy List 1 November 1945, sold and broken up 26 November 1946
Witter DE-63628 April 194317 October 194329 December 194322 October 1945Reclassified APD-58 in mid-1945 but conversion to High Speed Transport was canceled 15 August 1945. Struck from Navy List 16 November 1945, sold and broken up 2 December 1946
Bowers DE-63728 May 194331 October 194327 January 1944N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-40 25 June 1945
Willmarth DE-63825 June 194321 November 194313 March 194426 April 1946Struck from Navy List 1 December 1966, sold for scrap 1 July 1968
Gendreau DE-6391 August 194312 December 194317 March 194413 March 1948Struck from Navy List 1 December 1972, sold for scrap 11 September 1973
Fieberling DE-64019 March 19442 April 194411 April 194413 March 1948Struck from Navy List 1 March 1972, sold for scrap 20 November 1972
William C. Cole DE-6415 September 194329 December 194312 May 194413 March 1948Struck from Navy List 1 March 1972, sold for scrap 20 November 1972
Paul G. Baker DE-64226 September 194312 March 194425 May 19443 February 1947Struck from Navy List 1 December 1969, sold for scrap October 1970
Damon M. Cummings DE-64317 October 194318 April 194429 June 19443 February 1947Struck from Navy List 1 March 1972, sold for scrap 18 May 1973
Vammen DE-6441 August 194321 May 194427 July 194412 July 1969Struck from Navy List 12 July 1969, sunk as target 18 February 1971
Jenks DE-665 Dravo Corporation, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 12 May 194311 September 194319 January 194426 June 1946Conversion to High Speed Transport and reclassification as APD-67 canceled 1944. Struck from Navy List 1 February 1966, sold for scrap 5 March 1968
Durik DE-66622 June 19439 October 194324 March 194415 June 1946Conversion to High Speed Transport and reclassification as APD-68 canceled 1944. Struck from Navy List 1 June 1965, sold for scrap 30 January 1967
Wiseman DE-66726 July 19436 November 19434 April 194431 May 1946Struck from Navy List 15 April 1973, sold for scrap 29 April 1974
11 September 195015 April 1973
Weber DE-675 Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts 22 February 19431 May 194330 June 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-75 15 December 1944
Schmitt DE-67622 February 194329 May 194324 July 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-76 24 January 1945
Frament DE-6771 May 194328 June 194315 August 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-77 15 December 1944
Harmon DE-67831 May 194325 July 194331 August 194325 March 1947Struck from Navy List 1 August 1965, sold for scrap 30 January 1967
Greenwood DE-67929 June 194321 August 194325 September 194320 February 1967Struck from Navy List 20 February 1967, sold for scrap 6 September 1967
Loeser DE-68027 July 194311 September 194310 October 194328 March 1947Struck from Navy List 23 August 1968, sunk as a target 1969
9 March 195123 August 1968
Gillette DE-68124 August 194325 September 194327 October 19433 February 1947Struck from Navy List 1 December 1972, sold for scrap 11 September 1973
Underhill DE-68216 September 194315 October 194315 November 1943N/ASunk by Japanese Kaiten human torpedo northeast of Luzon 24 July 1945
Henry R. Kenyon DE-68329 September 194330 October 194330 November 19433 February 1947Struck from Navy List 1 December 1969, sold for scrap 22 October 1970
Bull DE-693 Defoe Shipbuilding Company, Bay City, Michigan 15 December 194225 March 194312 August 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-78 31 July 1944
Bunch DE-69422 February 194329 May 194321 August 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-79 31 July 1944
Rich DE-69527 March 194322 June 19431 October 1943N/ASunk by three mines off Utah Beach, Normandy 8 June 1944
Spangler DE-69628 April 194315 July 194331 October 19438 October 1958Struck from Navy List 1 March 1972, sold for scrap 20 November 1972
George DE-69722 May 194314 August 194320 November 19438 October 1958Struck from Navy List 1 November 1969, sold for scrap 12 October 1970
Raby DE-6987 June 19434 September 19437 December 194322 December 1953Reclassified DEC-698 2 November 1949, reclassified DE-698 27 December 1957. Struck from Navy List 1 June 1968, sold for scrap
Marsh DE-69923 June 194325 September 194312 January 19441 August 1962Struck from Navy List 15 April 1973, sold for scrap 20 February 1974
Currier DE-70021 July 194314 October 19431 February 19444 April 1960Sunk as a target off California 11 July 1967
Osmus DE-70117 August 19434 November 194323 February 194415 March 1947Struck from Navy List 1 December 1972, sold for scrap 27 November 1973
Earl V. Johnson DE-7027 September 194324 November 194318 March 194418 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 May 1967, sold for scrap 3 September 1968
Holton DE-70328 September 194315 December 19431 May 194431 May 1946Scrapped
Cronin DE-70419 October 19435 January 19445 May 194431 May 1946Reclassified DEC-704 13 September 1950, reclassified DE-704 27 December 1957. Struck from Navy List 1 June 1970, sunk as target 16 December 1971
9 February 19514 December 1953
Frybarger DE-7058 November 194325 January 194418 May 194430 June 1947Reclassified DEC-705 13 September 1950, reclassified DE-705 27 December 1957. Struck from Navy List 1 December 1972, sold for scrap 27 November 1973
6 October 19509 December 1954
Tatum DE-789 Consolidated Steel Corporation, Orange, Texas 22 April 19437 August 194322 November 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-81 15 December 1944
Borum DE-79028 April 194314 August 194330 November 194315 June 1946Conversion to High Speed Transport and reclassification as APD-82 canceled September 1945. Struck from Navy List 1 August 1965, sold for scrap 1966
Maloy DE-79110 May 194318 August 194313 December 194328 May 1965Conversion to High Speed Transport and reclassification as APD-83 canceled September 1945. Reclassified EDE-791 14 August 1946. Struck from Navy List 1 June 1965, sold for scrap 11 March 1966
Haines DE-79217 May 194326 August 194327 December 1943N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-84 15 December 1944
Runels DE-7937 June 19434 September 19433 January 1944N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-85 24 January 1945
Hollis DE-7945 July 194311 September 194324 January 1944N/AConverted to High Speed Transport, reclassified APD-86 24 January 1945
Gunason DE-7959 August 194316 October 19431 February 194413 March 1948Sunk as target 28 July 1973, struck from Navy List 1 September 1973
Major DE-79616 August 194323 October 194312 February 194413 March 1948Struck from Navy List 1 December 1972, sold for scrap 27 November 1973
Weeden DE-79718 August 194327 October 194319 February 19449 May 1946Struck from Navy List 30 June 1968, sold for scrap 27 October 1969
20 November 194626 February 1958
Varian DE-79827 August 19436 November 194329 February 194415 March 1946Struck from Navy List 1 December 1972, sold for scrap 12 January 1974
Scroggins DE-7994 September 19436 November 194330 March 194415 June 1946Struck from Navy List 1 July 1965, sold for scrap 5 April 1967
Jack W. Wilke DE-80018 October 194318 December 19437 March 194424 May 1960Struck from Navy List 1 August 1972, sold for scrap 4 March 1974

See also

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References

  1. Classes of Destroyer Escorts
  2. Rivet, Eric; Stenzel, Michael (22 April 2011). "History of Destroyer Escorts". Destroyer Escort Historical Museum. Retrieved 8 July 2012. The CANNON class was very similar in design to the BUCKLEY class, the primary difference being a diesel-electric power plant instead of the BUCKLEY class's turbo-electric design. The fuel efficient diesel electric plant greatly improved the range of the CANNON class, but at the cost of speed.

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