Bud Olsen

Last updated
Bud Olsen
Personal information
Born(1940-07-25)July 25, 1940
Hobart, Indiana
DiedMarch 12, 2018(2018-03-12) (aged 77)
Louisville, Kentucky
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Listed weight220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High school Belmont (Dayton, Ohio)
College Louisville (1959–1962)
NBA draft 1962 / Round: 2 / Pick: 13th overall
Selected by the Cincinnati Royals
Playing career1962–1970
Position Power forward / Center
Number16, 34, 13, 24, 29, 10
Career history
19621965 Cincinnati Royals
19651967 San Francisco Warriors
1967–1968 Seattle SuperSonics
1968 Boston Celtics
1968–1969 Detroit Pistons
1969–1970 Kentucky Colonels
Career NBA and ABA statistics
Points 1,935 (4.3 ppg)
Rebounds 1,485 (3.3 rpg)
Assists 542 (1.2 apg)
Stats   OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg at NBA.com
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Enoch Eli "Bud" Olsen III (July 25, 1940 March 12, 2018) was an American professional basketball player.

A 6'8" center from the University of Louisville, Olsen was selected by the Cincinnati Royals in the second round of the 1962 NBA draft. He played seven seasons in the NBA with the Royals, San Francisco Warriors, Seattle SuperSonics, Boston Celtics, and Detroit Pistons, averaging 4.3 points and 3.0 rebounds per game. He spent the 1969–70 season with the Kentucky Colonels of the American Basketball Association. [1]

Olsen died on March 12, 2018. [2]

Notes

  1. "Bud Olsen Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved August 31, 2007.
  2. Rutherford, Mike (March 12, 2018), "U of L legends Bud Olsen, Howard Stacey pass away", SB Nation


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