Buddy Tate

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Buddy Tate
Buddy Tate.jpg
Jazz saxophonist Buddy Tate with pianist Bubba Kolb at the Village Jazz Lounge in Walt Disney World
Background information
Birth nameGeorge Holmes Tate
Born(1913-02-22)February 22, 1913
Sherman, Texas, U.S.
DiedFebruary 10, 2001(2001-02-10) (aged 87)
Chandler, Arizona
Genres Swing, big band
Occupation(s)Musician
Instruments Saxophone, clarinet

George Holmes "Buddy" Tate (February 22, 1913 – February 10, 2001) was a jazz saxophonist and clarinetist.

Contents

Biography

Tate was born in Sherman, Texas, and began performing on alto saxophone. As a teenager in 1925, he played with his brother and their band called McCloud's Night Owls." [1]

Sherman, Texas City in Texas, United States

Sherman is a U.S. city in and the county seat of Grayson County, Texas. The city's population in 2010 was 38,521. It is one of the two principal cities in the Sherman–Denison Metropolitan Statistical Area, and it is part of the Texoma region of North Texas and southern Oklahoma.

Alto saxophone Type of saxophone

The alto saxophone, also referred to as the alto sax, is a member of the saxophone family of woodwind instruments invented by Belgian instrument designer Adolphe Sax in the 1840s, and patented in 1846. It is pitched in E, and is smaller than the tenor, but larger than the soprano. The alto sax is the most common saxophone and is commonly used in concert bands, chamber music, solo repertoire, military bands, marching bands, and jazz. The fingerings of the different saxophones are all the same so a saxophone player can play any type of saxophone.

Tate quickly switched to tenor saxophone making a name for himself in bands such as the one led by Andy Kirk. He joined Count Basie in 1939 and stayed with him until 1948. He had been selected by Basie after the sudden death of Herschel Evans, which Tate stated he had predicted in a dream.

Tenor saxophone type of saxophone

The tenor saxophone is a medium-sized member of the saxophone family, a group of instruments invented by Adolphe Sax in the 1840s. The tenor and the alto are the two most commonly used saxophones. The tenor is pitched in the key of B (while the Alto is pitched in the key of E), and written as a transposing instrument in the treble clef, sounding an octave and a major second lower than the written pitch. Modern tenor saxophones which have a high F key have a range from A2 to E5 (concert) and are therefore pitched one octave below the soprano saxophone. People who play the tenor saxophone are known as "tenor saxophonists", "tenor sax players", or "saxophonists".

Andy Kirk (musician) American musician

Andrew Dewey Kirk was a jazz saxophonist and tubist who led the Twelve Clouds of Joy, a band popular during the swing era.

Count Basie American jazz musician, bandleader, and composer

William James "Count" Basie was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer.

After his period with Basie ended, he worked with several other bands before he found success on his own, starting in 1953 in Harlem. His group worked at the "Celebrity Club" from 1953 to 1974. [2] In the late 1970s, he co-led a band with Paul Quinichette and worked with Benny Goodman.

Harlem Neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City

Harlem is a neighborhood in the northern section of the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is bounded roughly by Frederick Douglass Boulevard, St. Nicholas Avenue, and Morningside Park on the west; the Harlem River and 155th Street on the north; Fifth Avenue on the east; and Central Park North on the south. It is part of greater Harlem, an area that encompasses several other neighborhoods and extends west to the Hudson River, north to 155th Street, east to the East River, and south to 96th Street.

Paul Quinichette was an American jazz musician who played the tenor saxophone. He was known as the "Vice President" or "Vice Prez" for his uncanny emulation of the breathy style of Lester Young, known as "Prez". Young, who affectionately called everyone "Lady ****", called him "Lady Q". He was also capable of a gruffer style on his own.

Benny Goodman American jazz musician

Benjamin David Goodman was an American jazz clarinetist and bandleader known as the "King of Swing".

In 1980, he was seriously injured by scalding water in a hotel shower, which kept him inactive for four months. [3] He later suffered from a serious illness. The 1990s saw him slow down, but he remained active playing with Lionel Hampton among others.

Lionel Hampton American jazz vibraphonist, pianist, percussionist, bandleader and actor

Lionel Leo Hampton was an American jazz vibraphonist, pianist, percussionist, and bandleader. Hampton worked with jazz musicians from Teddy Wilson, Benny Goodman, and Buddy Rich to Charlie Parker, Charles Mingus, and Quincy Jones. In 1992, he was inducted into the Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame, and was awarded the National Medal of Arts in 1996.

In 1992, Tate took part in the documentary, Texas Tenor: The Illinois Jacquet Story. In 1996, he recorded with woodwind artist James Carter on the younger man's second release for Atlantic Records, Conversin' with the Elders , along with trumpeters Harry "Sweets" Edison and Lester Bowie, and saxophonists Hamiet Bluiett and Larry Smith.

Illinois Jacquet musician from the United States

Jean-Baptiste "Illinois" Jacquet was an American jazz tenor saxophonist, best remembered for his solo on "Flying Home", critically recognized as the first R&B saxophone solo.

James Carter (musician) American musician

James Carter is an American jazz musician. He is the cousin of jazz violinist Regina Carter.

Atlantic Records American record label

Atlantic Recording Corporation is an American record label founded in October 1947 by Ahmet Ertegün and Herb Abramson. Over its first 20 years of operation, Atlantic earned a reputation as one of the most important American labels, specializing in jazz, R&B, and soul by Aretha Franklin, Ray Charles, Wilson Pickett, Sam and Dave, Ruth Brown and Otis Redding. Its position was greatly improved by its distribution deal with Stax. In 1967, Atlantic became a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Bros.-Seven Arts, now the Warner Music Group, and expanded into rock and pop music with releases by Led Zeppelin and Yes.

Tate lived in New York until 2001 when he moved to Arizona to be cared for by his daughter. He died in Chandler, Arizona, at the age of 87.

Chandler, Arizona City in Arizona, United States

Chandler is a city in Maricopa County, Arizona, United States, and a prominent suburb of the Phoenix, Arizona, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). It is bordered to the north and west by Tempe, to the north by Mesa, to the west by Phoenix, to the south by the Gila River Indian Community, and to the east by Gilbert. As of 2017, the population was estimated at 253,458 according to the United States Census Bureau.

Discography

As leader

As sideman

With Ray Bryant

With James Carter

With Milt Buckner

With Buck Clayton

With Arnett Cobb

With Wild Bill Davis

With Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis

With Roy Eldridge

With Claude Hopkins

With Jay McShann

With Al Sears

With Rex Stewart

With Dicky Wells

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References

  1. "Buddy Tate". All About Jazz. Retrieved August 10, 2012.
  2. "Most Valued Player: Buddy Tate". Jazz Institute of Chicago. Archived from the original on February 25, 2014. Retrieved August 10, 2012.
  3. Porter, Bob (1981). Helen (LP). Helen Humes. New York: Muse Records.