Budo at the 1964 Summer Olympics

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Budō was featured in the Summer Olympic Games demonstration programme in 1964. [1]

This included demonstration of kyūdō, kendo and sumo. Judo, which is a budo, was part of the regular program.

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References

  1. Mallon, Bill; Heijmans, Jeroen (2011). Historical Dictionary of the Olympic Movement. p. 69. ISBN   9780810875227.