Bulgarian Cup

Last updated

Bulgarian Cup
Bulgarian football cup.jpg
Organising body Bulgarian Football Union (BFS)
Founded1938;83 years ago (1938)
RegionBulgaria
Number of teamsVarious
Qualifier for UEFA Europa Conference League
Domestic cup(s) Bulgarian Supercup
Current champions CSKA Sofia
(21st title)
Most successful club(s) Levski Sofia
(25 titles)
Television broadcasters Nova Broadcasting Group
Soccerball current event.svg 2020–21 Season

The Bulgarian Cup (Bulgarian : Купа на България, romanized: Kupa na Bulgaria) is a Bulgarian annual football competition. It is the country's main cup competition and all officially registered Bulgarian football teams take part in it.

Contents

The tournament's format is single-elimination, with all matches being one-legged, except the semi-finals. The competition's winner gets the right to take part in the UEFA Europa League. If the winner has already secured a place through the Bulgarian A Professional Football Group, the team that has come fourth in the championship substitutes it.

The competition has been dominated by Sofia-based teams. The Sofia teams have won together a total number of 64 titles. The three most successful teams are Levski Sofia (25 cups), CSKA Sofia (21 cups) and Slavia Sofia (8 cups). The current cup holders are CSKA Sofia, who beat Arda Kardzhali 1–0 in the 2021 final.

Format

The Bulgarian Cup tournament is divided in two phases - the Qualification phase and the Final phase.

Qualification phase

In this phase are participating teams from the four groups of the amateur division V AFG (3rd level of the Bulgarian football league system) and teams from Bulgarian A Regional Football Group (A RFG) (4th level of the Bulgarian football league system).

Final phase

In this phase are participating the teams that have won their matches in the Qualification phase, with the 20 teams from the two groups of B PFG (10 teams from West B PFG and 10 teams from East B PFG) and 16 teams from A PFG. The team from a lower league division is the home team. In matches between teams from same division the home team is determined by lot.

History

The Bulgarian Cup as a domestic cup knock-out tournament, has its roots in several tournaments held in Bulgaria through the early 20th century, simultaneously or successively starting in the 1910s with regional Sofia competitions.

Tsar's Cup

Sketch of the Tsar's Cup Tsar's Cup.png
Sketch of the Tsar's Cup

The Tsar's Cup (Bulgarian : Царска купа, romanized: Tsarska kupa) is recognised as the foundation of the modern domestic cup by the Bulgarian Football Union. The cup was founded in 1924, and until 1937 (and in 1943), it was awarded to the winner of the Bulgarian State Football Championship. The championship was a knockout tournament in which the champions of the country's districts ( oblasts ) played in one-legged single-elimination rounds.

From 1938 to 1942, a separate tournament was held to determine the cup champion, its winners are officially recognised as domestic cup holders by the BFS.

Soviet Army Cup

An annual cup competition was not held between 1943 and 1945 due to World War II. In 1946, Bulgaria, now a communist state, reformed its football league structure and competitions alike those in the Soviet Union. The new Central Football Committee created the Soviet Army Cup (Bulgarian : Купа на Съветската армия, romanized: Kupa na Savetskata armiya) in time for the 1945-46 season. Until the end of communist administration in Bulgaria in 1990, the annual two-legged knock-out tournament was held, its winners qualified for the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup.

The Soviet Army Cup was the country's primary cup tournament up to 1982. In the following years until 1990, the championship served as a secondary cup tournament, before ceasing to exist. The Bulgarian Football Union recognises the historic winners of the Soviet Army Cup as official domestic cup holders for the seasons between 1945–46 to 1981–82. Levski Sofia, being the club to have won the tournament the most times, were given the original trophy permanently.

Bulgarian Cup

In 1981, in honour of the 1300th Anniversary of the Bulgarian State, a national knock-out football tournament was introduced, awarding the winner with the Bulgarian Cup. The Soviet Army Cup tournament gradually lost its importance due to the success of the Bulgarian Cup and in 1983 it ceded primacy to the new competition. The winners of the Bulgarian Cup from 1982-83 onwards are considered official domestic cup holders.

Records

The most successful club in the cup tournament is Levski Sofia, having won 25 titles. Levski Sofia also hold the record for the biggest win in a Bulgarian Cup final, winning 5–0 against Pirin Blagoevgrad in 1992 and 5–0 against CSKA Sofia in 1998. CSKA Sofia are the only team to have claimed the trophy, from outside the top level of Bulgarian football, doing so in 2016, while representing the third tier of the country's football pyramid. Furthermore, CSKA Sofia hold the record for winning the most consecutive Bulgarian Cups (3 titles in a row), achieving that on two occasions, between 1972-1974 and 1987-1989.

Finals

Performance by club

A summary of the performance of various clubs who have taken part in the competition is shown in the table below. [1]

Final appearances by club
ClubWinsLast final wonRunners-upLast final lostTotal final appearances
Levski Sofia 25 2007 12 2018 37
CSKA Sofia 21 2021 13 2020 34
Slavia Sofia 8 2018 3 2011 11
Litex Lovech 4 2009 3 2007 7
Lokomotiv Sofia 4 1995 2 1977 6
Botev Plovdiv 3 2017 10 2019 13
Beroe Stara Zagora 2 2013 4 1980 6
Lokomotiv Plovdiv 2 2020 4 2012 6
Ludogorets Razgrad 2 2014 1 2017 3
FK 13 Sofia 2 1940 2
Cherno More Varna 1 2015 2 2008 3
Spartak Plovdiv 1 1958 2 1959 3
Spartak Sofia 1 1968 2 1967 3
Atletik-Slava 23 1 1941 1
Marek Dupnitsa 1 1978 1
Septemvri Sofia 1 1960 1
Shipka Sofia 1 1939 1
Sliven 1 1990 1
Pirin Blagoevgrad 4 2009 4
Spartak Varna 2 1983 2
Sportklub Plovdiv 2 1942 2
Levski Ruse 2 1939 2
Arda Kardzhali 1 2021 1
Akademik Sofia 1 1951 1
Chernolomets Popovo 1 1946 1
Chernomorets Burgas 1 1989 1
Dunav Ruse 1 1962 1
Minyor Pernik 1 1958 1
Montana 1 2016 1
Napredak Ruse 1 1941 1
Naftex Burgas 1 2000 1
Slavia-Chengelov Plovdiv 1 1948 1
Spartak Pleven 1 1957 1
Velbazhd Kyustendil 1 2001 1

Notes:

Non-official winners

Bulgarian Cup (1981–1982)

SeasonWinnerResultRunner-upDateVenueAttendance
1981 CSKA Sofia 1–0 Slavia Sofia 6 June 1981 Vasil Levski National Stadium, Sofia 25,000
1982 Levski Sofia 4–0 CSKA Sofia 16 June 1982 Vasil Levski National Stadium, Sofia 30,000

Notes:

Sponsorship

From 1997 to 2011 the Bulgarian Cup is sponsored by the American car manufacturer Ford and its official distributor in Bulgaria Moto-Pfohe.

From season 2011–12 the Bulgarian Cup is sponsored by the Bulgarian Corporate Commercial Bank.

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The 2011–12 Bulgarian Cup was the 30th official season of the Bulgarian annual football knockout tournament. The competition began in September 2011 with the matches of the Preliminary Round and ended with the final in May 2012. CSKA Sofia were the defending champions, but lost to Septemvri Simitli in the quarterfinals. Ludogorets Razgrad won the title, after defeating Lokomotiv Plovdiv in the final.

The 2012–13 Bulgarian Cup was the 31st official season of the Bulgarian annual football knockout tournament. The competition began on 13 October 2012 with the matches of the Preliminary Round and ended with the final on 15 May 2013. Ludogorets Razgrad were the defending champions, but were eliminated by CSKA Sofia in the second round. Beroe Stara Zagora won the title, their second overall, after defeating Levski Sofia in the final by penalties.

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The 2014–15 Bulgarian Cup was the 33rd official season of the Bulgarian annual football knockout tournament. The competition began on 23 September 2014 with the matches of the First Round and finished with the final on 28 May 2015. Ludogorets Razgrad were the defending champions, but lost to Levski Sofia in the semifinals.

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The 2016−17 Bulgarian Cup was the 35th official edition of the Bulgarian annual football knockout tournament. The competition began on 20 September 2016 with the first round and finished with the final on 24 May 2017. CSKA Sofia were the defending champions, but lost in the first round to Lokomotiv Sofia. Botev Plovdiv won its third cup, after winning the final against Ludogorets Razgrad. Botev, thus, qualified for the first qualifying round of the 2017–18 UEFA Europa League.

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The 2018−19 Bulgarian Cup was the 37th official edition of the Bulgarian annual football knockout tournament. The competition began on 25 September 2018 with the first round and finished with the final on 15 May 2019. Slavia Sofia were the defending champions, but lost on penalties in the round of 16 to Ludogorets Razgrad. The final was contested between Lokomotiv Plovdiv and Botev Plovdiv, thus being the first ever final to feature the Plovdiv derby. Lokomotiv won the final with the score of 1–0 and clinched their first ever cup title. They also qualified for the second qualifying round of the 2019–20 UEFA Europa League.

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The 2001–02 Bulgarian Cup was the 62nd season of the Bulgarian Cup. Levski Sofia won the competition, beating CSKA Sofia 3–1 in the final at the Stadion Slavia in Sofia.

References

  1. Todor Krastev. "Bulgaria Cups Overview". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 4 June 2019.
  2. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 25 September 2015. Retrieved 8 September 2015.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)