Bulgarian Supercup

Last updated

Bulgarian Football Supercup
Bulgarian football supercup.jpg
Founded1989;32 years ago (1989)
2004; (restored)
Country Bulgaria
Confederation UEFA
Number of teams2
Current champions Lokomotiv Plovdiv (2nd title)
Most championships CSKA Sofia
Ludogorets Razgrad (4 wins each)
Website Official Site

The Bulgarian Supercup (Bulgarian : Суперкупа на България) is the trophy won in a football match held between the football club that has won the Bulgarian first football division in the season that ended in the year of the match and the holder of the Bulgarian Cup at that time. In case the champion of Bulgaria has also won the cup, the Bulgarian Cup finalist competes with the champion in the match for the trophy.

Contents

The Supercup match is usually held during the weekend before the start of a new season. Since 2004 the Supercup game has been an annual event. The most successful club in the event is Ludogorets Razgrad with four Supercup titles and three times being runners-up. Ludogorets Razgrad is the club that has participated in most seasons of the Supercup with seven appearances. The competition has been dominated by Sofia-based teams. The Sofia teams have won together a total number of 7 titles.

History

Inaugural Event 1989

Bulgarian Supercup 1989 Bulgarian supercup for 1989.png
Bulgarian Supercup 1989

The first match for the Bulgarian Supercup was held in 1989. The match was proposed by Kiril Zaharinov, sports editor at the Bulgarian News Agency and secretary of the union of the Bulgarian sport journalists at that time.

The match was held at 9th September Stadium in Burgas, opposing 1988-89 Bulgarian champion and Cup holder CFKA Sredets (now CSKA Sofia) and the runner-up in the 1988–89 edition of the Bulgarian Cup Chernomorets Burgas. CSKA won the match 1-0 thanks to a goal by Hristo Stoichkov.

The first Supercup trophy was made in Italy and was 80 cm tall, weighing 15 kg. Today it is kept in the CSKA Sofia museum.

Since 2004

Bulgarian Supercup (2007-2011) Bulgarian supercup.png
Bulgarian Supercup (2007-2011)
Bulgarian Supercup (2011-) Supercup bulgaria 2011.jpg
Bulgarian Supercup (2011-)

After the political changes of 1989 in Eastern Europe the Bulgarian Supercup match was suspended. Fourteen years later the Bulgarian Professional Football League in association with the Bulgarian Football Union decided to restore the event organising a Supercup match between the champion of the 2003-04 season Lokomotiv Plovdiv and the 2003–04 Bulgarian Cup holder Litex Lovech. The match was held at Naftex Stadium in Burgas and Lokomotiv won 1-0 after a last-minute goal by Ivan Paskov.

Since the restoration of the tournament in 2004 eight teams have participated in the event and six of them have managed to win the trophy - Lokomotiv Plovdiv (winners in 2004), Levski Sofia (winners in 2005, 2007 and 2009), CSKA Sofia (winners in 2006, 2008 and 2011), Litex Lovech (winners in 2010), Ludogorets Razgrad (winners in 2012), and Beroe Stara Zagora (winners in 2013).

Since 2004 all the winners of the Supercup trophy have also been runners-up in other editions of the tournament, making the inaugural runner-up Chernomorets Burgas in 1989 the only participant in the event to not have won the trophy.

In 2011 the winner of the cup CSKA Sofia became the single most successful team in the event, winning their fourth trophy as they beat Litex Lovech with final score 3–1. Also, as of 2011 Litex Lovech has participated six times in the Supercup match - most of all other participants.

From 2004 onwards a brand new trophy is made for every event as it was decided by the organisers that each Supercup winner should retain the trophy in perpetuity. However, three designs have been used for the trophy as of 2014 - one for the Supercups of 2004–2006, another for the trophies of 2007-2010 and the third from 2011 onwards. The current trophy was designed in Italy in 2007 and is 100 cm tall.

Supercup finals

SeasonWinnerScoreRunner-upVenueAttendanceReport
1989
15 July 1989
CFKA Sredets (1)
Winner of 1988–89 A Group
and 1988–89 Bulgarian Cup
1 – 0 Chernomorets Burgas
Runner-up of 1988–89 Bulgarian Cup
9th September Stadium,
Burgas
20,000 Report
2004
31 July 2004
Lokomotiv Plovdiv (1)
Winner of 2003–04 A Group
1 − 0 Litex Lovech
Winner of 2003–04 Bulgarian Cup
Naftex Stadium,
Burgas
4,300 Report
2005
31 July 2005
Levski Sofia (1)
Winner of 2004–05 Bulgarian Cup
1 – 1 ( a.e.t. )
(3–1 p )
CSKA Sofia
Winner of 2004–05 A Group
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
9,894 Report
2006
30 July 2006
CSKA Sofia (2)
Winner of 2005–06 Bulgarian Cup
0 – 0 ( a.e.t. )
(3–0 p )
Levski Sofia
Winner of 2005–06 A Group
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
9,751 Report
2007
26 July 2007
Levski Sofia (2)
Winner of 2006–07 A Group
and 2006–07 Bulgarian Cup
2 – 1 ( a.e.t. ) Litex Lovech
Runner-up of 2006–07 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
14,000 Report
2008
3 August 2008
CSKA Sofia (3)
Winner of 2007–08 A Group
1 – 0 Litex Lovech
Winner of 2007–08 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
8,950 Report
2009
1 August 2009
Levski Sofia (3)
Winner of 2008–09 A Group
1 – 0 Litex Lovech
Winner of 2008–09 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
2,300 Report
2010
12 August 2010
Litex Lovech (1)
Winner of 2009–10 A Group
2 – 1 ( a.e.t. ) Beroe Stara Zagora
Winner of 2009–10 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
1,700 Report
2011
30 July 2011
CSKA Sofia (4)
Winner of 2010–11 Bulgarian Cup
3 – 1 Litex Lovech
Winner of 2010–11 A Group
Lazur Stadium,
Burgas
12,620 Report
2012
11 July 2012
Ludogorets Razgrad (1)
Winner of 2011–12 A Group
and 2011–12 Bulgarian Cup
3 − 1 Lokomotiv Plovdiv
Runner-up of 2011–12 Bulgarian Cup
Lazur Stadium,
Burgas
2,730 Report
2013
10 July 2013
Beroe Stara Zagora (1)
Winner of 2012–13 Bulgarian Cup
1 – 1 ( a.e.t. )
(5–3 p )
Ludogorets Razgrad
Winner of 2012–13 A Group
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
1,070 Report
2014
13 August 2014
Ludogorets Razgrad (2)
Winner of 2013–14 A Group and 2013–14 Bulgarian Cup
3 − 1 Botev Plovdiv
Runner-up of 2013–14 Bulgarian Cup
Lazur Stadium,
Burgas
4,400 Report
2015
12 August 2015
Cherno More Varna (1)
Winner of 2014–15 Bulgarian Cup
1 − 0 Ludogorets Razgrad
Winner of 2014–15 A Group
Lazur Stadium,
Burgas
1,810 Report
2016
Not held
Not played §
2017
9 August 2017
Botev Plovdiv (1)
Winner of 2016–17 Bulgarian Cup
1 – 1
(5–4 p )
Ludogorets Razgrad
Winner of 2016–17 First League
Lazur Stadium,
Burgas
3,800 Report
2018
5 July 2018
Ludogorets Razgrad (3)
Winner of 2017–18 First League
1 − 0 Slavia Sofia
Winner of 2017–18 Bulgarian Cup
Trace Arena,
Stara Zagora
850 Report
2019
3 July 2019
Ludogorets Razgrad (4)
Winner of 2018–19 First League
2 − 0 Lokomotiv Plovdiv
Winner of 2018–19 Bulgarian Cup
Vasil Levski,
Sofia
3,800 Report
2020
2 August 2020
Lokomotiv Plovdiv (2)
Winner of 2019–20 Bulgarian Cup
1 − 0 Ludogorets Razgrad
Winner of 2019–20 First League
Huvepharma Arena,
Razgrad
0 Report

§Note: The 2016 Bulgarian Supercup was meant to be the 14th Bulgarian Supercup, an annual Bulgarian football match played between the winners of the previous season's Bulgarian A Football Group and Bulgarian Cup. The game was to be played between CSKA Sofia, winners of the 2016 Bulgarian Cup Final, and Ludogorets Razgrad, champions of the 2015–16 A Group. However, prior to the match CSKA Sofia bankrupted, followed by taking another team's professional license. As a consequence, the 2016 Bulgarian Supercup final was not held.

Performance

Performance by club

ClubWinnersRunners-upYear(s) WonYear(s) lost
Ludogorets Razgrad
4
4
2012, 2014, 2018, 2019 2013, 2015, 2017, 2020
CSKA Sofia
4
1
1989, 2006, 2008, 2011 2005
Levski Sofia
3
1
2005, 2007, 2009 2006
Lokomotiv Plovdiv
2
2
2004, 2020 2012, 2019
Litex Lovech
1
5
2010 2004, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011
Beroe Stara Zagora
1
1
2013 2010
Botev Plovdiv
1
1
2017 2014
Cherno More Varna
1
2015
Chernomorets Burgas
1
1989
Slavia Sofia
1
2018

Performance by city

CityWinsClubs
Sofia 7 CSKA (4), Levski (3)
Razgrad 4 Ludogorets (4)
Plovdiv 3 Lokomotiv (2), Botev (1)
Lovech 1 Litex (1)
Stara Zagora 1 Beroe (1)
Varna 1 Cherno More (1)

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