Bulli, New South Wales

Last updated

Bulli
Wollongong,  New South Wales
Bulli Aerial.jpg
Aerial view of Bulli
Australia New South Wales location map blank.svg
Red pog.svg
Bulli
Coordinates 34°20′03″S150°54′48″E / 34.33417°S 150.91333°E / -34.33417; 150.91333 Coordinates: 34°20′03″S150°54′48″E / 34.33417°S 150.91333°E / -34.33417; 150.91333
Population6,105 (2016 census) [1]
Postcode(s) 2516
LGA(s) City of Wollongong
State electorate(s) Keira
Federal Division(s) Cunningham
Suburbs around Bulli:
Thirroul
Bulli
Woonona
Map of Bulli Bulli Map.jpg
Map of Bulli
panorama of the suburb and northern Wollongong's coastline Bulli Wollongong.jpg
panorama of the suburb and northern Wollongong's coastline

Bulli ( /ˈbʊl/ BULL-eye) is a northern suburb of Wollongong situated on the south coast of New South Wales, Australia. Bulli is possibly derived from an Aboriginal word signifying "double or two mountains", but other derivations have been suggested. [2]

Contents

Originally inhabited by Wodi Wodi Aboriginal people, European wood cutters worked in the area from about 1815. The area was once abundant in Red Cedars, these are now still seen but thinly. The first permanent European settler was Cornelius O'Brien, who established a farm in 1823 and whose name was given in the pass at O'Briens Road south at Figtree.

Bulli soil is also the primary source of soil and foundation of Sydney Cricket Ground, which makes the SCG being seen traditionally as one of the most spin-friendly international cricket grounds in Australia. [3]

Coal

The Bulli Coal Company opened a mine in 1862 on the escarpment and built cottages to house miners and their families. Coal was transported by rail from the mine to Bulli Jetty at Sandon Point where it was loaded onto ships. [4]

The miners were paid in accordance with production, they were not paid a set wage. The first trade union in the Illawarra region was formed by miners at Bulli in 1879. Management retaliated by firing and evicting union miners and hiring non-union labour.

On 23 March 1887 a gas explosion in the mine killed 81 men and boys, leaving 50 women widows and 150 children without fathers. There was one survivor, a 17-year-old boy who became known as "Boy Cope". A memorial obelisk listing the names of those who perished is situated in Park Road, Bulli, adjacent to the railway line. [5] The mine reopened later in the year. The Bulli Mine Disaster was the worst in Australia's history until surpassed in 1902 by Mount Kembla.

The disaster was first examined by a coroner's inquest. The verdict was delivered by the jury as: "Yes the Jury are of the opinion that William Wade and others came to their death in the Bulli Coalmine on 23rd or March 1887 by a gas explosion". The jury then added a rider: "which was brought about by the disregard of the Bulli Colliery Special Rules and Coal Mines Act, in allowing men to work when gas existed". [6] Following the coroner's inquest a royal commission was established under the chairmanship of Dr. James R. M. Robertson to inquire into the accident. [7]

Air entering the mine was divided into two. One part went to the western district, the other continued down the main tunnel and supplied the Hill End district which was where the explosion occurred. Within the Hill End District the air passed through each of six headings in turn before being ejected by a furnace at the foot of an upcast shaft. [8] Clearly this meant that any firedamp (usually methane) released by the earlier headings was drawn across the later headings where the men were working. Along each heading were the areas where men extracted the coal. They were known as bords. When a bord had been worked out it was simply sealed off, but this meant that any firedamp accumulating there was not promptly removed. [8] Each tunnel was used for three purposes: as a travelling road (for access to parts of the mine), as a haulage road (for bringing coal out) and as a ventilation passage. To control the ventilation doors were used, but they had to be opened for the passage of trains of skips. Each opening disrupted the air currents throughout that section of the mine. [9]

The mine has since long been leveled, with only concrete foundations revealing the location of the old office area and other buildings. Hidden along the cliff behind said foundations can be found the old mine entrances. These have been sealed with up to 12 feet of concrete, with a drainage line set in the concrete. To the east is the remnants of the sorting site, a few scattered foundations and a tar patch.

The old railway line from the mine to the coast has mostly been removed, but as you drive south into Bulli you will see the bridge it was set in, now used as a walkway over the highway after a fatal car accident involving a school child saw it restored. This bridge now features a welcome sign for the historic 'black diamond' district.

Population

According to the 2016 census of Population, there were 6,105 people in Bulli.

Landmarks

Shark Bay (Bulli), or 'Sharky', and Waniora Point, viewed from Sandon Point Bulli From Beach.jpg
Shark Bay (Bulli), or 'Sharky', and Waniora Point, viewed from Sandon Point

Bulli Beach (pictured below) is a popular surfing spot. The northern tip (Sandon Point) is a venue for regular surfing competitions.

Bulli's main historical feature is the railway station, situated between the escarpment and the surf beaches. The station was the first on the south coast and contains a museum which is open every Sunday.

Another historic feature is the Heritage Hotel, which was opened in 1889. This is in the heart of the 'Black Diamond' district.

The Illawarra Grevillea Park is an arboretum and botanic garden which opened in 1993. It houses the repository or living collection of the Grevillea Study Group of the Australian Plants Society (previously SGAP). It is a botanic garden containing plants native to Australia – its collections include grevilleas, prostantheras and rainforest plants. Staffed and run by volunteers, it is open 6 weekends a year.

Behind the Illawarra Grevillea Park is Slacky Flat Park which is home to some reasonably undisturbed remnant rainforest and numerous species of native birds and marsupials.

The town has a small chain of commerce in its central district west of the station, and includes a newsagent and several specialty stores. The town is home to St Joseph's Catholic Primary School (current principal Mrs Luisa Tobin), Bulli Public School, Waniora Public School and Bulli High School, New South Wales.

At Sandon Point and Tramway Creek immediately north of the promontory, there is some remnant bushland including turpentine forest. This is an important migratory bird location and a history walk has been set up along the road were the old railway used to go. This point is also the site of a midden area. For over fifteen years the local community has been campaigning against residential development of this coastal floodplain and wetland. This included over 150 submissions to a Commission of Inquiry which recommended against further major development. Minister for Planning, Frank Sartor, however has overridden his COI to give Stockland and the Anglican Village Retirement Trust approval to add over 1000 residential houses and units.

Heritage listings

Bulli has a number of heritage-listed sites, including:

Related Research Articles

Wollongong City in New South Wales, Australia

Wollongong, informally referred to as "The Gong", is a seaside city located in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia. Wollongong lies on the narrow coastal strip between the Illawarra Escarpment and the Pacific Ocean, 68 kilometres (51 miles) south of central Sydney. Wollongong had an estimated urban population of 302,739 at June 2018, making it the third-largest city in New South Wales after Sydney and Newcastle, and the tenth-largest city in Australia. The city's current Lord Mayor is Gordon Bradbery AM who was elected in 2018.

Port Kembla, New South Wales Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Port Kembla is a suburb of Wollongong 8 km south of the CBD and part of the Illawarra region of New South Wales. The suburb comprises a seaport, industrial complex, a small harbour foreshore nature reserve, and a small commercial sector. It is situated on the tip of Red Point, first European sighting by Captain James Cook in 1770. The name "Kembla" is Aboriginal word meaning "plenty [of] wild fowl".

Mount Keira Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Mount Keira is a suburb and mountain in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia.

Mount Kembla Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Mount Kembla is a suburb and a mountain in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia.

Stanwell Park, New South Wales Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Stanwell Park is a picturesque coastal village and northern suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. It is the northernmost point of the Illawarra coastal strip and lies south of Sydney's Royal National Park. It is situated in a small valley between Bald Hill to the north, Stanwell Tops to the west and Mount Mitchell to the south. It has two lagoons from the village's two creeks, Stanwell and Hargrave Creeks and a beach running between headlands. Like other towns in the region the village is known colloquially known as TFOE, this is an acronym for the postcode (2508).

Thirroul, New South Wales Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Thirroul is a northern seaside suburb of the city of Wollongong, Australia. Situated between Austinmer and Bulli, it is approximately 13 kilometres north of Wollongong, and 69 km south of Sydney. It lies between the Pacific Ocean and a section of the Illawarra escarpment known as Lady Fuller Park, adjacent to Bulli Pass Scenic Reserve.

Wonthaggi Town in Victoria, Australia

Wonthaggi is a seaside town located 132 kilometres (82 mi) south east of Melbourne via the South Gippsland and Bass Highways, in the Bass Coast Shire of Gippsland, Victoria, Australia. Known originally for its coal mining it is now the largest town in South Gippsland, a regional area with extensive tourism, beef and dairy industries.

Bulli railway station

Bulli railway station is a heritage-listed railway station on the South Coast railway line in New South Wales, Australia. It serves the northern Wollongong suburb of Bulli. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 30 August 2013.

Thirroul railway station

Thirroul railway station is a heritage-listed railway station on the Illawarra line in New South Wales, Australia. It serves the northern Wollongong suburb of Thirroul. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Illawarra escarpment mountain range in New South Wales, Australia

The Illawarra escarpment, or officially the Illawarra Range, is the fold-created cliffs and plateau-eroded outcrop mountain range west of the Illawarra coastal plain south of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. The range encloses the Illawarra region which stretches from Stanwell Park in the north to Kiama, Gerringong and the Shoalhaven River in the south.

Wendy Richardson Australian playwright

Wendy Richardson, OAM is one of Australia's most popular playwrights, best known as the author of Windy Gully. Richardson lives in Mount Kembla near Wollongong, New South Wales. She is very active in the local community, working with disabled and disadvantaged youth, assisting those in need, teaching Sunday School and participating in historical and literary events.

Coalcliff, New South Wales Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Coalcliff is a town on the coast of New South Wales, Australia, between Sydney and Wollongong. Together with Stanwell Park it belongs to the Little Bulli indentation of the northern Illawarra coast strip.

Helensburgh, New South Wales Town in New South Wales, Australia

Helensburgh is a small town in New South Wales, Australia. Helensburgh is located 45 kilometres south of the Sydney central business district and 34 kilometres (21 mi) north of Wollongong. Helensburgh is in the local government area of Wollongong City Council and marks the northern end of the Illawarra region. It is approximately halfway between Sydney and Wollongong, at the southern end of the Royal National Park.

Clifton, New South Wales Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Clifton is a village on the coast of New South Wales, Australia, between Sydney and Wollongong. Along with nearby Coalcliff, the village began life as a coal-mining centre. It is situated on a narrow area between the sea and the Illawarra escarpment. The electrified South Coast railway line passes through, but the station at Clifton was closed in 1915.

Austinmer, New South Wales Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Austinmer is a northern village of Wollongong on the south coast of New South Wales, Australia. It sits in the northern Illawarra region, south of Stanwell Park and immediately north of Thirroul.

Scarborough, New South Wales Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Scarborough is a small northern seaside suburb of Wollongong on the south coast of New South Wales, Australia. It sits in the northern Illawarra region on a narrow stretch between the Illawarra escarpment and sea cliffs.

Corrimal, New South Wales Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Corrimal is a northern suburb of the city of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. Corrimal's CBD is situated on the Princes Highway, and several streets adjacent to it. The main shopping centres are Lederer Corrimal and Corrimal Park Mall next to the park on the highway. Outside this centre is an old locomotive that is affectionately known as "The Green Frog" that Corrimal is known for, the welcome signs featuring it. It ran on the Bulli Colliery Line to Bellambi Haven from 1909 to 1967. To the west is a lawn bowls club and a wealthy foothill neighbourhood of residences bordering bushland.

Bellambi, New South Wales Suburb of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia

Bellambi is a suburb of Wollongong in the Illawarra region of New South Wales, Australia. It has a railway station on the NSW TrainLink South Coast Line.

Brunner Mine mine in New Zealand

The Brunner Mine was a coal mine on the West Coast of the South Island in New Zealand.

Bulli Jetty, Sandon Point, New South Wales

Bulli Jetty at Sandon Point, was first built in 1863 and was abandoned in 1943. During that time it was used by the Bulli Coal Company in the transportation of coal from the Bulli mine to the ships for export to other destinations.

References

  1. 1 2 Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Bulli (State Suburb)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 16 July 2017. OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg CC-BY icon.svg Material was copied from this source, which is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  2. Bulli - Place names, Wollongong City Council, 30 October 2008, archived from the original on 30 October 2008
  3. "SCG keeps its spin as soil crisis solved". Cricinfo. Retrieved 3 January 2016.
  4. The Bellambi and Bulli Coal Mining Company Railway Eardley, G.H. Australian Railway Historical Society Bulletin, May, 1976 pp89–111
  5. https://www.google.com.au/maps/contrib/114695300737239756850/contribute/@-34.333657,150.915213,3a,75y,90t/data=!3m8!1e2!3m6!1s121169756!2e1!3e10!6s%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com%2Fproxy%2FugEBM556iUdMR6j4AedKcrrGu8UvLc9rgVBw7dDUpdm4olErmZHyjDAEguAA8siYQe5PffB-mET8Y7f0J5UHY6G-sRs3590%3Dw203-h143!7i1706!8i1204!4m3!8m2!3m1!1e1?hl=en
  6. Turner, J.W., Coalmining and Manufacturing in Newcastle, 1797-1900 (Thesis), University of Newcastle quoted in Dingsdag 1993 , p. 30
  7. Dingsdag, Donald P. (1993), The Bulli Mining Disaster 1887: lessons from the past, St Louis Press, p. 34, ISBN   0 646 13673 9
  8. 1 2 Dingsdag 1993, p. 45.
  9. Dingsdag 1993, p. 46.
  10. "Family Hotel". New South Wales State Heritage Register . Office of Environment and Heritage. H00263. Retrieved 18 May 2018.
  11. "Bulli Railway Station group and Movable Objects". New South Wales State Heritage Register . Office of Environment and Heritage. H01829. Retrieved 18 May 2018.