Burnet R. Maybank

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References

  1. 1 2 "Maybank Votes; Goes To Columbia". News & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. September 17, 1941. p. 2. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  2. "The Leader South Carolina Needs (editorial)". News & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. September 11, 1938. p. 1. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  3. Bass, Jack; Poole, Scott (2009). The Palmetto State. Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press. p. 164.
  4. "Maybank Sells Tradd St. House For $45,000". News & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. January 15, 1950. pp. 3E. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  5. "Next Governor Cheered By 600 at Big Banquet". News & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. November 9, 1938. p. 1. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  6. "War Declared by Maybank On Gambling and Bootlegging". News & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. January 19, 1939. p. 1. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  7. "Governor Steps in to Save Jail Wall from Demolition". News & Courier. March 20, 1939. p. 10. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  8. "Governor Bests Olin D. Johnston in Runover Race". News & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. September 17, 1941. p. 1. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  9. 1 2 Andrew Glass. "Powerful senator's early death roils South Carolina politics, Sept. 1, 1954". Politico. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  10. Burnet Maybank Senatorial Papers Archived November 6, 2008, at the Wayback Machine , College of Charleston
  11. "Beneath the Magnolias". Time . September 13, 1954.
  12. "Final Rites Held For Sen. Maybank". News & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. September 4, 1954. p. 1. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  13. Stockton, Robert (December 11, 1971). "New Building To Be Named For Maybank". News & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. pp. 1B. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  14. Stockton, Robert (July 12, 1972). "Maybank Building Ceremonies Held". News & Courier. Charleston, South Carolina. pp. 10A. Retrieved January 20, 2014.

Sources

Burnet R. Maybank
Burnet R. Maybank.jpg
United States Senator
from South Carolina
In office
November 5, 1941 September 1, 1954
Party political offices
Preceded by
Olin D. Johnston
Democratic nominee for Governor of South Carolina
1938
Succeeded by
Preceded by Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from South Carolina
(Class 2)

1941, 1942, 1948, 1954
Succeeded by
Political offices
Preceded by Mayor of Charleston, South Carolina
1931–1938
Succeeded by
Preceded by Governor of South Carolina
1939–1941
Succeeded by
Preceded by Chairman of the Senate Banking Committee
1949–1953
Succeeded by
U.S. Senate
Preceded by U.S. senator (Class 2) from South Carolina
1941–1954
Served alongside: Ellison D. "Cotton Ed" Smith, Olin D. Johnston
Succeeded by